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Informed Nutrition Choices and Improved Access to Nutritious Foods in Asia
 

Informed Nutrition Choices and Improved Access to Nutritious Foods in Asia

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    Informed Nutrition Choices and Improved Access to Nutritious Foods in Asia Informed Nutrition Choices and Improved Access to Nutritious Foods in Asia Presentation Transcript

    • Photo credit: iDE/ Allison Joyce Enabling Informed Nutrition Choices and bli I f d N t iti Ch i d Greater Access to Nutritious Foods through a Participatory Market Chain Approach World Bank, Washington, 8 November, 2013
    • International Development Enterprises • Founded in 1982 • iDE currently operates 12 country programs in Asia, Africa, and Latin America • Delivered more than 250 projects in market and private sector developed valued at over $150 million in over 20 countries worldwide • Funding from more than 90 donors, including USAID, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, DFID, CIDA, and the World Bank • Recipient of over 10 international development and design awards since 2004 • Employs over 500 staff worldwide Mission to create income and livelihood opportunities for poor rural households households. iDE is focusing on: - Product design and innovation - Technology commercialization - Market systems development Working in agriculture, water and sanitation, access to finance (A2F), and energy and environment.
    • Funded through the EU Technology Transfer for Food Security in Asia (TTFSA) Program, ANEP seeks to improve the food security and nutrition of poor and vulnerable households through: • Improving livelihoods through increasing farm p p g g g productivity; y • Improving nutrition through better access to nutritious foods; and, • Making the benefits last through sustainable market linkages. Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • • 935 million people in the world still suffer from hunger, most of them in Asia – where more than 70 % of malnourished children live • Vulnerable groups such as the poor, especially children, in isolated g p p y rural communities and urban slums suffer most • Food security is about availability, access, use and stability Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • • Some of the lowest indicators of nutrition and health in Asia - 45% stunting in Bangladeshi children g g • Smallholders in Bangladesh need access to improved agricultural technologies and markets • In the case of vulnerable communities the private sector has not established adequate input supply and output marketing systems, resulting in low productivity and reduced market opportunities Photo credit: Geology.com, 2006 This project is funded by The European Union
    • • Bringing world-class research in agronomy and agro-technologies d t h l i from the international centres • Deploying nutrition education techniques already established through USAID Nobo Jibon Program ( g (Paris Declaration) ) • Implementing by building the capacity of local organizations • Ensuring greater efficiency, efficiency effectiveness and sustainability through the market-development approach Photo credit: iDE/ David Graham This project is funded by The European Union
    • • Riverine area of southern Bangladesh • 3 upazillas of Barisal Division p • Rural - low lying land and chars (islands) in the lower Megna river • Urban – peri-urban areas of Barisal peri urban City (500,000 approx). • The ANEP in Bangladesh is seeking to reach 5 000 rural and 5 000 urban 5,000 5,000 HHs directly and 30,000 through VCs Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • How do we complement effective use with sustainable availability and access...? Photo credit: iDE/ David Graham This project is funded by The European Union
    • Developed by DFID to facilitate coordination of value-chain actors for sectors with smallholders. t ith llh ld Aims to improve the market access of small-scale farmers by generating collaboration amongst market chain actors. Builds upon existing capital: - Natural - Infrastructure - Financial - Human, and, - Social Adapted from: Bernet T Thiele G. and Zschocke T 2006. Participatory Market Chain Approach (PMCA) – User Guide T., G T., 2006 Guide. International Potato Center (CIP) – Papa Andina, Lima, Peru. This project is funded by The European Union
    • Understands that competitiveness is dynamic and continuous adjustments are needed to sustain it. Those involved need to constantly identify and take advantage of new market opportunities d t f k t t iti Adapted from: Bernet T Thiele G. and Zschocke T 2006. Participatory Market Chain Approach (PMCA) – User Guide T., G T., 2006 Guide. International Potato Center (CIP) – Papa Andina, Lima, Peru. This project is funded by The European Union
    • Market Chain Actors Development Partner Mobilizes stakeholders in subsector thematic groups that provide coordination and joint management of activities. Generic three phase process and p p strong focus on market demand and trust building. Idea is to stimulate innovations amongst groups based upon shared ideas, trust, and incentives. Adapted from: Bernet T Thiele G. and Zschocke T 2006. Participatory Market Chain Approach (PMCA) – User Guide T., G T., 2006 Guide. International Potato Center (CIP) – Papa Andina, Lima, Peru. This project is funded by The European Union
    • How is PMCA applied in ANEP to support improved nutrition...? Photo credit: iDE/ Allison Joyce This project is funded by The European Union
    • Social mobilization Nutrition Education for households with: - Pregnant women - Lactating mothers - Children under 5 ANEP Nutrition Nutrition Education for: - Pregnant women - Lactating mothers - Children under 5 - Adolescent Girls Social mobilization Rural Producer Households Social mobilization Technology transfer through PSAs in: - Aquaculture - Field crops - Vegetable Private Sector Actors (PSAs) ANEP Production Creating and developing sustainable market linkages for both rural producers and urban consumers and the development of grass roots institutions grass-roots institutions. Urban Households H h ld
    • Behaviour Change Communication as Demand Creation for nutritious foods Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • Key Messages Basic nutrition practices (healthy (h lth vs unhealthy f d h lth food choices, food preparation) Infant feeding practices gp (amount, frequency, and consistency of complimentary feedings) Hygiene and disease information (6 critical ti t hh d t ) times to wash hands etc)
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers NE Low income urban consu mers Mobile Traders Rural Produc ers Nutrition Education (NE) sessions improve nutrition by encouraging the consumption of nutritious foods and improving knowledge of basic nutrition practices, infant feeding practices and hygiene. Women associated with each urban or rural group receive 12 sessions over 3 months using the Participatory Action Learning (PAL) approach where the group learns a nutrition practice and then applies it in action through activities such as cooking demonstrations.
    • Generating Availability through g y g Participatory Production & Sales Planning Linkages g g Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers NE Low income urban consu mers Rural Produc ers Mobile Traders PSPM IMAs/ LSPs
    • LSPs Providers of productivityP id f d ti it enhancing services - Technology (bed-planting, tilling, sowing, fertilizer application etc) - Agro-veterinary/agronomic advisory services - Fi Financial service providers i l i id Local existing retailers of improved inputs IMAs Buyers of harvest PSPM Rural Produc ers IMAs LSPs Who are the rural stakeholders...? OMAs OMAs
    • Collaborative development of Production and Sales Plans (PSPs), informed by demand-side information from OMAs PSPs provide information on constraints for particular production strategies, informs further programming requirements from ANEP PSPM Rural Produc ers IMAs LSPs OMAs
    • Maximizing Availability through g y g Grassroots Aggregation Institutions Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers CPMC CP NE Low income urban consu mers Rural Produc ers Mobile Traders PSPM SPs
    • LSPs CP IMAs IMAs CPMC LSPs OMAs OMAs Rural Produc ers
    • Collection Points act as supplyside hubs through which PSPMs g can be coordinated and linkages between actors strengthened, particularly with lead firms Collection Point Management Committees (CPMCs) coordinate CP functions and liase with lead firms and larger buyers CP IMAs CPMC LSPs OMAs Rural Produc ers
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers CPMC CP NE Low income urban consu mers Rural Produc ers Mobile Traders PSPM SPs
    • Is it working ? working...? • 82% of vegetable farmers attend the PSPMs, of which 88% are practicing off season production (compared to nil in the baseline). Productivity in key crops such h i h has increased (bitt gourd 28% b ttl gourd 34% and sweet gourd 40% per d (bitter d 28%, bottle d 34%, d t d dec). Incomes have increased by BDT 8,850 (€88) above the baseline for 82% of vegetable farmers. This represents an average 8% income increase in family income from baseline (BL). • Local service providers (LSPs) are reaching additional value chain households (VCHHs) with technologies through value chains. In Aquaculture for example, 58% of local feed and fertilizer LSPs are increasing their customer base by 50%, and local fingerling traders have increased their customer base by 11%. (MRM data, Q5-7) d t Q5 7) Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • Improving Access through rural-urban linkages to enable greater access to nutritious foods Photo credit: iDE This project is funded by The European Union
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers CPMC CP NE Low income urban consu mers Rural Produc ers Mobile Traders FM PSPM SPs
    • Who are the urban stakeholders...? Market/ land owners Local Govt. Imams and comm. leaders Imams and comm. leaders FM Local politici ans Low income urban consu mers Local Govt. Mobile Traders Market land owner Local politici ans
    • Pushti-mela or Farmers’ markets... ’ Entertainments which attract urban consumers to whom the farmers and mobile traders can sell fresh produce Imams and comm. leaders Point of Sale with ‘healthy’ messages for mobile traders to promote nutritious foods FM Local politici ans Low income urban consu mers Entertainment choices to reinforce nutrition messages from the NE sessions Local Govt. Mobile Traders Market land owner
    • Is it working ? working...? - More nutritious vegetables and fish are being bought by urban consumers. 54% of treatment group are buying 2-3 nutritious foods compared to 17% of control group (2 foods only), (7 day recall data). - The number of customers has doubled for treatment mobile traders (100% increase) compared to 18% for control. The volume of business/ sales increased by 55% amongst treatment LSPs, compared to 18% in control group. t l - 63% of the treatment group are feeding nutritious foods (small fish with bones, eggs, chicken) to 7-59 months children, compared to 29% control group (24 hour recall) recall). (MRM Data Q6-7) Photo credit: iDE/ Allison Joyce This project is funded by The European Union
    • But ill l t? B t will it last? Photo credit: iDE/ David Graham This project is funded by The European Union
    • Supply (Rural) Demand (Urban) Low income rural consu mers CPMC CP NE Low income urban consu mers Rural Produc ers Mobile Traders FM MMC FBA PSPM SPs
    • Market C Chain Actors Development Partner Formation of a market management committee (MMC) to institutionalize the function Need to develop the governance and financial mechanisms to deliver new innovations which work for the urban community For this we need to focus on the business model of the th MMC This project is funded by The European Union
    • Business Model: Establishment of Market Management Committee (MMC) Low income urban consum ers Aggregation/ $ $ Rural Producti on Mobile Traders Fresh produce MMC Fresh produce Sustainability comes from the viability of the business model Actors: Urban consumers; mobile traders; Rural Producers; MMC
    • Market Chain Actors Development Partner Developing capacity of lead farmers to conduct PSPM and represent groups to players in the system Groups’ capacity is enhanced – the trust is developed to plan production through shared risk and reward behaviors Who can provide the facilitation service going forward? f d? Development of FBA This project is funded by The European Union
    • Some thoughts thoughts... Nutrition programming can focus more on changing p g g g g consumer behaviours in addition to knowledge transfer Agricultural programming is effective when it is demand g p g g driven with interventions at the service market level Programming should evolve over the course of the action – need to be iterative (following the PMCA ethos) Engagement Areas Technical Inputs Output marketing Entry Interventions Exit Points FFS/ NE Tech transfer/ information transfer led by market actors Asset transfer Retailing through local PSAs Group aggregation Sustainable access to markets Photo credit: iDE/ David Graham This project is funded by The European Union