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Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools
 

Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools

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The Urban Forest Modeling and Prioritization Toolkit is a prototype web-based tool that enables users to generate heat maps identifying key planting locations and then estimate the long-term impacts ...

The Urban Forest Modeling and Prioritization Toolkit is a prototype web-based tool that enables users to generate heat maps identifying key planting locations and then estimate the long-term impacts of trees planted in those locations.

This webinar was held on June 28, 2012 and provides an overview of the research and initial features of the system.

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    Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools Presentation Transcript

    • Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools 340 N 12th St, Suite 402 Philadelphia, PA 19107 215.925.2600 info@azavea.com www.azavea.com/forestry
    • About Us Deborah Boyer Urban Forestry Project Manager dboyer@azavea.com 215.701.7506 Carissa Brittain Software Developer cbrittain@azavea.com 215.701.7716
    • Agenda• Azavea Background• Urban Forest Modeling and Prioritization Toolkit• Finding Prioritized Planting Locations – Research review – Identifying key locations• Modeling Future Benefits – Research review – Estimating long term impact• Questions
    • About Azavea• Founded in 2000• 30+ people• Based in Philadelphia – Also Boston & Minneapolis• Geospatial + web + mobile – Software development – Spatial analysis services – User experience
    • Research-Driven • 10% Research Program • Academic CollaborationB Corporation • Pro Bono Program • Donate share of profits • Projects w/ Social Value • Open Source
    • Azavea and Urban Forestry An open source tree data management systemfor collaborative, geography enabled urban tree inventory www.opentreemap.org
    • High Performance Geoprocessing• GeoTrellis – an open source geographic data processing engine• Breaks big projects into small distributed tasks• Makes geographic analysis really, really fast• Helps create web-based heat maps
    • How Is It Used?
    • Urban Forest Modeling and Prioritization Toolkit
    • Goals
    • The Main QuestionsHow do we identify key tree planting locationsbased on a variety of factors?How do we begin to estimate the long termimpacts of trees planted in a certain location?
    • Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Toolkit• Funded with a USDA Small Business Innovation Research Grant• Focuses on identifying prioritized tree planting locations• Recognizes people have different planting priorities• Enables users to set adjustable factors in order to create customized heat maps• Calculates the thirty year benefits of trees planted in a certain area using growth/mortality rates and iTree
    • Finding Key Locations
    • Previous Research
    • Factors that Can Influence PlantingTier 1 – Need Based Criteria• Air Quality/Noise Pollution – Major Road Density• Biodiversity – Ecological Corridor Density – Existing Habitat Density• Public Health – % of Population Sedentary, Obese, Diabetic, Asthma• Water – Flood Density – % Impervious Service Locke, D.H., M.Grove, J.W.T. Lu, A.• Urban Heat Island Troy, J.P.M. O’Neil-Dunne, and B. Beck. 2010. Prioritizing preferable locations for – Max. Avg. Surface Temp. increasing urban tree canopy in New York• Socioeconomic City. Cities and the Environment – Income 3(1):article 4. – Crime
    • Additional Factors• Tier 2 – Suitability Based Criteria• Based on interests of a particular organization• May include factors such as – Street trees vs. backyard trees – Protected habitats – Natural areas vs. developed areas Locke, D.H., M.Grove, J.W.T. Lu, A. Troy, J.P.M. O’Neil-Dunne, and B. Beck. 2010. Prioritizing preferable locations for increasing urban tree canopy in New York City. Cities and the Environment 3(1):article 4.
    • Opportunity, Capacity, Impact Nowak, D. and E. Greenfield. 2009.• Population Density Urban and Community Forests of the• Canopy Green Space Mid-Atlantic Region: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. United States• Tree Canopy Cover Per Department of Agriculture, Forest Capita Service, Northern Research Station, General Technical Report NRS-47.We looked at this in terms of:• Opportunity – Places trees could be planted• Capacity – People to care for trees• Impact – Trees will effect desired factors
    • Identifying Locations
    • Where to get the data?• Major streets • American Community• Mass transit routes Survey data• Habitat ranges • Police crime data• Protected lands • Impervious surface• Land cover/tree canopy • U.S. Geological Survey slope• Asthma data data• Obesity data • DVRPC Degrees of Disadvantage info• Flood zone maps • Pennsylvania Horticultural• Sewershed overflow events Society TreeTenders’ areas• Landsat imagery
    • Simple and Advanced Models
    • Let the User Choose the Factor
    • Additional Map Layers
    • Customize Map Viewing Options• Choose opacity• Show a certain percentage of ideal locations• Add more geographic boundaries• Change your basemap
    • Demo
    • Modeling Benefits
    • Previous Research
    • Growth RatesNowak, D. 1994. Chapter 6: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Reduction by Chicagos Urban Forest. Results of the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project. USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, General Technical Report NE-186.
    • Mortality RatesPhiladelphia Street Tree Survival Rates Roman, L. 2006. Trends in Street Tree Survival, Philadelphia, PA. ScholarlyCommons, University of Pennsylvania.Average Mortality Based on Land-Use Type, Species, DBH Class, and Condition Nowak, D, et al. 2004. Tree Mortality Rates and Tree Population projections in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, vol 2, issue 3, p 139-147.
    • Ecological Benefits• i-Tree – Air Quality – Greenhouse Gas – Energy – Water• Customized for current costs in Philadelphia
    • Estimating Impact
    • Choose Geographic Area
    • Plant Trees and Set Mortality
    • View Benefits
    • Compare Scenarios
    • Demo
    • Future Features
    • Ideas for Additional Development• National data sets• More customized scenario settings• Cloud based deployment• Cartography redesign
    • Questions?
    • Contact Us Deborah Boyer Urban Forestry Project Manager dboyer@azavea.com 215.701.7506 Carissa Brittain Software Developer cbrittain@azavea.com 215.701.7716
    • Exploring Urban Forestry Modeling and Prioritization Tools 340 N 12th St, Suite 402 Philadelphia, PA 19107 215.925.2600 info@azavea.com www.azavea.com/forestry