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Are you struggling with ITSM tool selection?

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To view this complimentary webcast in full, visit: http://forms.axiossystems.com/LP=314 …

To view this complimentary webcast in full, visit: http://forms.axiossystems.com/LP=314

Jean-Pierre Garbani from Forrester Research discusses the growing trend of companies that are switching from customized ITSM tools to out-of-the-box ITSM tools. This video demonstrates how out-of-the box solutions can meet the needs of the company at a significantly lower on-going and long-term cost.

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  • User Request Catalog
  • POLLING Q 1
  • Without metrics, organizations would have to operate on gut instinct or feelings. Although sometimes accurate, this approach is inconsistent and dependent on individual experience A decision based on an inaccurate conclusion can be costly. Choosing the wrong vendor or failing to measure business results, may result in attending to ineffective activities or focusing on the wrong results.
  • Data has not only to be accurate and up to date but also needs to be appropriate for IT and business needs. We need to ensure we capture data that will allow us to produce reports that identify business trends and that aids decision making.
  • POLLING Q 2 Over the next few slides we are going to look at some of the typical types of reports that organisation’s produce. These reports have been grouped into a number of logical types. Traditionally reporting has been seen as producing hard-copy documents, today reporting is capable of producing much more interactive, flexible and parameter driven reports that can be distributed in a number of different ways
  • Demand management deals with activities that understand and influence the customer demand for services and providing capacity to meet those demands.
  • POLLING Q 3 AT END Optimize service design to suit demand – ensure that the attributes of a service accurately meet the customer use of that services Adjust allocation of resources and scheduling to meet demands – more efficient scheduling and use of resources Ability to approve suitable incentives to influence demand – influence business to use services at times when we have spare capacity or perhaps when it’s cheaper to use those services Ability to accurately approve investments in additional capacity, new services or changes to services
  • POLLING Q 4 AT END
  • This report in particular shows, in one view, the different areas described earlier in the Service Catalog Supply Chain slide. We can identify here the demand against services and how this compares with our projections and we can identify which requests against services are looking like they will breach their SLAs.
  • POLLING Q 5
  • Throughout this series of webcasts we’ve emphasized the importance of understanding what the business needs and ensuring IT delivers that….. The real purpose of metrics is to help you make better decisions.  The objective of a metric is to operate as a gauge, or indicator of process operation.  Metrics are to aid in making good decisions, they exist to identify gaps in skills or resources required to attain the goal.  Good metrics focus on the issues that affect the team, and that put attainment of the process goal or objective into jeopardy.     Keep it simple.  A common problem manager’s face is overloading a metric.  That is, trying to get a single metric to report more than one thing.  If you want to track more than one thing, create a metric for each.  Keep the metric simple and easy to understand.  If it is too hard to determine the metrics people often fake the data or the entire report.   Good enough is good enough.  Do not waste time polishing your metrics.  Instead, select metrics that are easy to track, and easy to understand.  Complicated or overloaded metrics often require excessive work, usually confuse people, and do not get used.   A few good metrics.  Too many metrics, even if they are effective, can overwhelm a team.  For any process 3 to 6 CSF is usually all that is required.  Each CSF might have 1 to 3 KPI.  This means most teams and individuals might have just 2-5 metrics related to their activities or process.  Any more and either the metrics won't get reported, or the data gets faked.  Too many metrics transforms an organization into a reporting factory -- focusing on the wrong things for the wrong reasons.  In either case, the usefulness of the metric is compromised.    Beware the trap of metrics.   Failure to follow these guidelines invariably results in process problems.  Look around your current organization.  How many reports are actually used to help make decisions?  Don't assume, ask around, you will probably be surprised.  Its not uncommon to discover reports written for group "A" are not used by group "A".  In many cases, group "A" thinks the report is for group "B" and vice versa.  The result is work without reward.  Discontinue reports no one actually uses.  Review each metric as well, and if they do not tell you something about the efficiency, effectiveness, economy, or equity of the process, discontinue or refine it.  It is all too easy to fall into the trap of metrics for the sake of metrics.
  • Throughout this series of webcasts we’ve emphasized the importance of understanding what the business needs and ensuring IT delivers that….. The real purpose of metrics is to help you make better decisions.  The objective of a metric is to operate as a gauge, or indicator of process operation.  Metrics are to aid in making good decisions, they exist to identify gaps in skills or resources required to attain the goal.  Good metrics focus on the issues that affect the team, and that put attainment of the process goal or objective into jeopardy.     Keep it simple.  A common problem manager’s face is overloading a metric.  That is, trying to get a single metric to report more than one thing.  If you want to track more than one thing, create a metric for each.  Keep the metric simple and easy to understand.  If it is too hard to determine the metrics people often fake the data or the entire report.   Good enough is good enough.  Do not waste time polishing your metrics.  Instead, select metrics that are easy to track, and easy to understand.  Complicated or overloaded metrics often require excessive work, usually confuse people, and do not get used.   A few good metrics.  Too many metrics, even if they are effective, can overwhelm a team.  For any process 3 to 6 CSF is usually all that is required.  Each CSF might have 1 to 3 KPI.  This means most teams and individuals might have just 2-5 metrics related to their activities or process.  Any more and either the metrics won't get reported, or the data gets faked.  Too many metrics transforms an organization into a reporting factory -- focusing on the wrong things for the wrong reasons.  In either case, the usefulness of the metric is compromised.    Beware the trap of metrics.   Failure to follow these guidelines invariably results in process problems.  Look around your current organization.  How many reports are actually used to help make decisions?  Don't assume, ask around, you will probably be surprised.  Its not uncommon to discover reports written for group "A" are not used by group "A".  In many cases, group "A" thinks the report is for group "B" and vice versa.  The result is work without reward.  Discontinue reports no one actually uses.  Review each metric as well, and if they do not tell you something about the efficiency, effectiveness, economy, or equity of the process, discontinue or refine it.  It is all too easy to fall into the trap of metrics for the sake of metrics.

Transcript

  • 1. Service Catalog Reporting Step Your Metrics Up A Gear Barclay Rae, Global Head of Services Brian Hendry, Service Development Manager
  • 2. Agenda
      • Service Catalog – what is it?
      • Making the most of metrics
      • Benefits of metrics
      • Top tips for metrics
      • Summary of webcast series
      • Questions and feedback
  • 3. Axios Systems Timeline assyst 8 launched US Expansion Windows Web Web 2.0 Green-Screen Axios founded assyst Classic launched assyst Enterprise launched Entry into the US market Axios ranked #1 vendor in HDI 'Customer Experience' report Expansion into Canada Axios retains #1 vendor ranking in HDI 'Customer Experience' report assyst launched on Java architecture Further expansion in the US, Europe and entry into Asia Pacific Axios awarded Software Company of the Year First in the world to achieve BS 15000 certification Entry into Middle East and Africa The number of assyst end-users tops 10 million Axios awarded Software Company of Year (again) Axios rated #1 vendor for 3rd time in succession in HDI 'Customer Experience' report Expansion into Russia, Eastern and Southern Europe and South America Axios wins International Excellence Award Expansion within Middle East ITIL V1 ITIL V3 ITIL V2 European expansion begins assyst 9 launched Service Catalog SaaS 1988 2005 1990 1995 1997 2000 2001 2003 2004 2006 2007 2008 2009/10
  • 4. Service Catalog – what is it?
  • 5.  
  • 6. Service Catalog Elements
    • Elements:
    • User Request Catalog
    • For the IT end-user Self-service request fulfillment
    • Similar to online shopping experience
    • Business Service Catalog View
    • For the business customer
    • In business terms
    • Specific non-IT information
      • Service Level (SLA) information
    • Technical Service Catalog View
      • For the IT provider
      • Technical and supply-chain details
      • Component level service data
      • OLA and UC information
  • 7. Service Catalog Elements
  • 8. Service Catalog Overview
  • 9. Service Catalog Supply Chain Delivery Order Received Product Fulfillment Pass to Distribution Workflow
  • 10. Making the most of metrics
  • 11. Why Have Metrics?
    • Without metrics, organizations would have to operate on gut instinct/feelings
    • A decision based on an inaccurate conclusion can be costly
    • Time wasted is money wasted. In this era of tight resources, our organizations cannot afford to waste either
    • By monitoring a few key business metrics, organizations can gauge their business results and can improve them
  • 12. What Do We Need To Ensure Meaningful Metrics?
    • Everyone is aware of the saying “garbage in, garbage out”
    • Producing good quality metrics will be difficult without having accurate, appropriate and up-to-date data to report on
    • IT needs to ensure that they are storing the correct data and adequately maintaining it
    • This data is the lifeblood of good metrics
  • 13. Customer Inputs
  • 14. IT Inputs
  • 15. Typical types of reports
  • 16. Demand Management Request volumes against services and offerings Purpose : Shows the number of requests made against individual services and service offerings over a defined time period. Type : Number of requests made for services and offerings Benefits : Provides a clear view of the level of demand against services and can be used to predict demand for following periods. This will allow better financial and capacity budgeting.
  • 17. Demand Management Business demand for the services and offerings provided by IT Purpose : Shows the current position regarding the costs of offerings completed, offerings pending and the budget remaining. Type : Request Costs vs Budget Request Totals vs Threshold Benefits : Provides a clear view of which services are close to consuming their allocated budget/threshold and allows pro-active action to either slow the consumption of those services or request additional funding. .
  • 18. Demand Management Predicted business demand for the services and offerings Purpose : Shows the current position regarding the costs of offerings completed, offerings pending and the budget remaining and the predicted costs for the entire period. Type : Predicted Request Costs vs Budget Predicted Request Totals vs Threshold Benefits : Provides a clear view of which services are close to consuming their allocated budget/threshold and allows pro-active action to either slow the consumption of those services or request additional funding.
  • 19. Demand Management - Outcomes
    • Optimize service design to suit demand
    • Adjust allocation of resources and scheduling to meet demands
    • Ability to approve suitable incentives to influence demand
    • Ability to accurately approve investments in additional capacity, new services or changes to services
  • 20. Cost Management Costs and prices incurred in fulfilling requests Purpose : Will display the prices IT charged the business for fulfilling their requests over a set period. These can be grouped by service. Type : Request Fulfillment Costs by Dept and/or Service Benefits : By allowing the business to identify their spend on IT services, this report provides the business with an opportunity to reduce that spend through the analysis of why services are being requested. This report also allows the business to predict future request levels leading to more accurate budgeting.
  • 21. Cost Management - Outcomes
    • Ability to identify which services cost most to provide
    • Allow IT to demonstrate the value they are generating through the services they provide
    • Allow departmental managers to see exactly where they are spending their budget
    • Give departmental managers the opportunity to rationalize the services they need and reduce costs
  • 22. IT Inputs
  • 23. Service Level Management Performance of service events against Service Level Agreements (SLA) Purpose : Shows the percentage of service requests resolved within SLA. Type : Service Request Performance Benefits : Allows IT and the business to see how well the department is fulfilling service requests within the agreed SLAs. This will ensure IT remains focused on delivering requests within the agreed timescales and allow analysis of the areas where the timescales are not being met.
  • 24. Service Level Management Purpose : Shows the percentage of service requests close to SLA breach by service. Type : Service Requests near SLA Breach Performance of service events against Service Level Agreements Benefits : IT will be able to identify which service requests are getting close to breaching their SLAs, helping them prioritize their workload. It will also allow IT to identify service request types that are regularly failing SLA and investigate underlying causes.
  • 25. SLA - Outcomes
    • Identify which requests breach their SLAs
    • Ability to identify why those requests are breaching SLAs
    • Provide solutions to those issues
    • Improve delivery of requests and increase customer satisfaction
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28. User Interaction Methods used to interact with IT Purpose : Displays how events are being resolved, e.g. by the Service Desk, by 2 nd Line or the user through FAQs. Type : Method of Resolving Events Benefits : This dashboard will allow IT to identify how well the business community is utilizing the central knowledge base to resolve their events. Analysis of this information will help the forecasting of future Service Desk resourcing requirements.
  • 29. Total Service Performance Service status against a number of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Purpose : Shows the overall status of services against a number of KPIs. Type : Total Service Performance Benefits : Provides a clear indication of the health of a number of services. It provides warnings of potential service issues and indicates which service KPIs need closer investigation. This information will allow potential issues to be resolved before they have caused a service problem and disruption.
  • 30.  
  • 31. Benefits That Metrics Can Bring
    • Good metrics help optimize the performance of the entire organization
    • Directs focus on specific performance objectives
    • Makes it easier to spot trends and respond to issues
    • Helps align IT with the business goals
    • Drives efficiency, effectiveness and quality
    • Inspires continual improvements
    • Can help reduce costs
  • 32. Top Tips for Metrics
    • Work with the business to identify meaningful metrics
    • Ensure they enable decision making
    • Keep them simple
    • Good enough is a good place to start
    • Focus on a few, good metrics
  • 33. Summary
  • 34. Top Tips for Building a Business Case
      • Define a business-based service strategy
        • Work with customers to understand their service expectations and priorities
        • Define the IT business services
        • Use workshops for common understanding
      • Define the IT service ‘supply chain’
        • Define and design the services and IT components required
        • Build the Service Catalog
        • Review the efficiency and cost of key services
        • Identify areas for improvement
      • Find the value
        • Build an improvement plan with business objectives and costs
        • Business case and ROI over 2/3 years
        • Build a practical program to implement
        • Get people on board
  • 35. Top Tips for Designing and Defining Services
    • Ensure involvement and buy-in from IT and business
    • Run strategy workshop
    • Define structure of services
    • Define services and service offerings
    • Use technology to help the definition, population and maintenance of the Service Catalog
    • Establish a service focus culture within IT and start thinking in service terms
  • 36. Top Tips for Successful SLAs
    • Start with services – understand what current services are provided and what needs to be designed for improvement
    • Ask the business what they want – or what they think their services are
    • Use simple and appropriate language
    • Keep the SLA realistic and achievable
    • Only set up an SLA that can be measured
    • Keep them short and concise – otherwise no one will read them
    • Keep smiling
  • 37. Top Tips for Metrics
    • Work with the business to identify meaningful metrics
    • Ensure they enable decision making
    • Keep them simple
    • Good enough is a good place to start
    • Focus on a few, good metrics
  • 38. Additional Resources
    • Axios Systems Details:
    • www.axiossystems.com
    • [email_address]
    • http://twitter.com/axios_systems
    • http://www.servicecatalogblog.blogspot.com
    • Service Catalog Resources:
    • Sharon Taylor Webcast
    • Sharon Taylor White Paper
    • Webcast Series:
    • 3 Steps to Building a Service Catalog Business Case
    • Designing and Designing Your Services
    • Rapid & Relevant SLAs : Integrating Service Catalog with the Business
    • More information can be found on the Axios Systems website.
    • Information on the assyst Service Catalog can be also be found
    • on our website.