Get on your bike; cycling education in the Netherlands

1,477 views

Published on

In the Netherlands cycling is a crucial part of the transport system and culture. For men and women, for young, middle-aged and old, the rich and the poor.
Cycling education is an essential element to keep up the high cycling rates. Also, it is an important instrument to make traffic safe for cyclists. In practice this means that there are three main target groups for cycling education: children, adults that come from countries with a non-cycling background and elderly.
This formal and informal education plays an important role in keeping up the high level of independent mobility for all.
Parents play an important role in the informal cycling education of their children. Schools add to this with theoretical and practical lessons. Apart from this education for children, there are also trainings for adults with a background from non-cycling countries. Especially women with young children want to learn to cycle, as the opportunity that cycling offers fits very well to their specific transportation needs.
Another specific target group for cycling education are the elderly. Traditionally elderly keep on cycling. Through education they are more aware of the specific aspects that many elderly face in traffic on their bicycle.
In the Netherlands the vast majority of the inhabitants know how to bicycle and know the rules of traffic for cyclists. People that drive a car are also cyclists at other moments during the day or week. Together with a lot of attention for road design, separation of transportation modes and traffic calming where necessary this has created a relatively safe environment for the many cyclists that are on the road each day.
The formal and informal cycling education system that has evolved in the Netherlands over the years, can be an inspiration for other countries that are developing their own cycling culture. Parents, schools, community groups and e.g. associations of elderly all play their specific role. At the same time, examples from other countries that are developing their cycling culture can be a source of inspiration for Dutch initiatives.

Published in: Education, Sports
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,477
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
64
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Get on your bike; cycling education in the Netherlands

  1. 1. Get on your Bike!Cycling Education in the Netherlands
  2. 2. Topics1. The Dutch context: independent mobility & participation2. What is cycling education?3. Informal education4. Formal education5. Specific target groups6. Conclusion
  3. 3. 1. The Dutch context: independent mobility & participation
  4. 4. 1. The Dutch context: independent mobility & participation
  5. 5. 1. The Dutch context: independent mobility & participation
  6. 6. 2. What is cycling education?Wikipedia says:• Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts. In its narrow, technical sense, education is the formal process by which society deliberately transmits its accumulated knowledge, skills, customs and values from one generation to another, e.g., instruction in schools.
  7. 7. 2. What is cycling education? General, broad sense: Narrow, technical sense: • The means through which the • The formal process by which aims and habits of a group of society deliberately transmits people lives on from one its accumulated knowledge, generation to the next. skills, customs and values from one generation to another, e.g., • It occurs through any instruction in schools. experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts.
  8. 8. 2. What is cycling education?My definition:• Cycling education: a person’s experiences and activities that help them in the proces of learning to ride a bicycle.With the aim to:• Being able to ride a bicycle independently in daily traffic in a manner that is safe for the cyclist and others.
  9. 9. 2. What is cycling education? Experience People Bicycles+ Place
  10. 10. 2. What is cycling education?Experience =• Feelings of confidence, trust, fun• Practical skills• Knowlegde about (rules of) traffic• Learning to estimate risks in order to anticipateExtra:• Routing and wayfinding• Basic technical understanding of the bicycle• Knowledge of (handy) assessoires
  11. 11. 3. Informal cycling education
  12. 12. 3. Informal cycling education
  13. 13. 3. Informal cycling education
  14. 14. 3. Informal cycling education
  15. 15. 3. Informal cycling education
  16. 16. 3. Informal cycling education
  17. 17. 3. Informal cycling education
  18. 18. 4. Formal education in schoolsCycling education is part of the road safety education programin primary school:• integrated into schoolplan• theoretical and practical• attention for road safety around the school• and safe routes to school• parent’s involvement
  19. 19. 4. Formal education in schools
  20. 20. 4. Formal education in schools
  21. 21. 5. Specific target groups
  22. 22. 5. Specific target groupsVideo impression of cycle training for immigrant and refugee women inTilburg.• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auAaOh-gOa8&feature=shareThey are the parents that also want to train their children.
  23. 23. 5. Specific target groups
  24. 24. 5. Specific target groups
  25. 25. 5. Conclusions CHERISH THEM Confidence PARENTS!!! Trust Inspiration Personal growth FUN
  26. 26. Contact: a.vanderkloof@mobycon.nl / www.mobycon.com Any questions? THANK YOU! How can I get in touch? - Talk in person at conference - Twitter: @AngelavdKloof - LinkedIn - Email

×