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Workbook am

  1. 1. AdWords™ Seminar For Success Supported by MORNING TRACK WORKBOOK Anastasia Holdren stasia@sitening.com http://sitening.com
  2. 2. Table of Contents Introduction to Online Advertising & Google AdWords • Types of Online Advertising • Basics of Pay-Per-Click Advertising • Introduction to AdWords ‣ Features ‣ Benefits ‣ Basic Terminology Account Navigation • Creating an Account • Proper Account Structure • Understanding Campaign, Ad Group, and Keyword Statistics • Edit Campaign Settings • Edit CPCs • Account Tools Billing & Reports • Report Center • Billing Summary Page • Billing Cycle Beginning Optimization • Choosing Keywords • Creating Compelling Ad Text • Language & Regional Targeting Options AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 2 of 68
  3. 3. Introduction to Online Advertising & Google AdWords™ Why advertise online? Because online spending is on the rise. In 2006 U.S. retail eCommerce sales will reach an estimated $108.5 billion. Source: www.eMarketer.com AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 3 of 68
  4. 4. Online Retailers Should: • Create compelling websites that make it easy for consumers to find, learn about and purchase products and services • Create targeted online advertising campaigns to help consumers find, learn about and purchase products and services • Optimize websites for search engine visibility Types of Online Advertising • Graphical Banner Ads/Video/Flash Ads (Rich Media) • Text ads • Pop Ups • Paid Listings/Inclusion/Directories • Sponsorships Banner Ad on www.bostondirtdog.com AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 4 of 68
  5. 5. Paid Directory Listing on www.botw.org AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 5 of 68
  6. 6. Sponsorships and Banner Ads on FMI dailyLead. Sign up at www.Smartbrief.com AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 6 of 68
  7. 7. Text Ads on www.google.com MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 7 of 68
  8. 8. What is Pay-Per-Click Advertising (PPC)? What is pay-per-click advertising (PPC)? It’s a pricing model where the advertiser specifies a rate they are willing to pay when a visitor clicks on an advertisement. This can include advertising on a search engine website or partner websites. If your ad is displayed 100 times but clicked on 25, you pay for 25 clicks, at the price you set (or lower). Why Do People Like PPC So Much? Control -over campaign Feedback on performance Relevancy - ads are targeted to searcher’s intentions Measurable Results - you know how many people click on your ad Other Models: CPM: Advertiser pays a fee per thousand impressions (ad views) whether it was clicked on or not. Flat Fee: Fee for running an online advertisement for a specific period of time, regard- less of how many impressions or clicks. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 8 of 68
  9. 9. Introduction to Google AdWords™ Google AdWords is Google's advertising program. Why does it work so well? ✒ Keyword-Based Advertising The system matches a visitor’s intentions with advertisements that can be targeted spe- cifically to their need. Examples: I am hungry for Brazilian food! I search Google.com for: “brazilian restaurant in los an- geles.” Tonight I will eat at Gaucho’s Village: I have never seen the Golden Gate Bridge! I search Google for “golden gate bridge tour.” Maybe I’ll take a Bay Cruise tomorrow: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 9 of 68
  10. 10. Wow, I miss Boston. I’ll try to snag some tickets to a Celtics game while I’m in town. I’ll search Google for tickets. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 10 of 68
  11. 11. Some Cool Features The Google Network The Google Network is made up of thousands of content and search sites displaying targeted Google ads. These sites include major web portals and search sites, as well as sites that are enrolled in the Google AdSense program. Some Search Network Members: • AOL • Ask.com • AT&T Worldnet • CompuServe • Shopping.com • Netscape NetCenter Some Content Network Members: • About.com • Lycos • InfoSpace • HowStuffWorks • Food Network • NYTimes.com AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 11 of 68
  12. 12. Search Network • Ads are shown on the search results pages search sites and shopping com- parison engines. • Keyword targeted ads - contextually targeted. • Text ads only. • Advertisers cannot use site-targeting to select individual search network sites. • Formatting can vary slightly from site to site, and will be automatically adjusted. Content Network • Contextually targeted - keyword-based advertisement. • Site targeted - allows advertiser to select website sites on which to run ads. In- stead of matching keywords to content, it targets a specific audience. Site target- ing is priced by CPM, not CPC. • Image ads are reserved for the content network, and will not appear on search network sites. They can be contextually or site targeted. • Text and image ads: Formatting can vary slightly from site to site, and will be automatically adjusted. • Smart Pricing - content network ads sometimes return lower conversion rates than ads on Google.com. Google automatically lowers the cost of content clicks based on the referring site if data shows that clicks from a particular page are less likely to convert. Language Targeting • Google lets users choose the language in which they want to search. Google will only display ads that are targeted to the chosen language. We’ll discuss later in the session. Location Targeting • Display ads to targeted areas: countries, regions, cities, customized areas. We’ll discuss later in the session. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 12 of 68
  13. 13. Benefits of AdWords • RELEVANCE - Ads targeted to potential customers, engaging them when they are actively looking for specific products or services. • TARGETING - Ads can be shown to people in the areas you do business. You do not have to display ads to people who aren't likely to purchase from you. • CONTROL - You can change your ad campaign anytime, at no cost. • COST - You control the budget. Set it as high or as low as you want. There is no minimum advertising spend. • FLEXIBILITY - Updates are live within 15 minutes. AdWords is available 24 hours a day. Ads start running almost immediately after you activate your account and provide payment information. • REACH - AdWords reaches approximately 80 percent of U.S. Internet users and hundreds of millions more worldwide. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 13 of 68
  14. 14. Basic Terminology AdWords - Google’s advertising program. AdSense - the program publishers use to place Google AdWords ads on their websites to receive revenue from Google, when visitors click on the ads (or view ads, for site- targeted ad campaigns). Ad Position - where your ad appears in relation to other ads on a page. Position #1 is the first ad; there are up to 10 positions available on a Google search result page. Bid Discounter - Google system of automatically lowering your bid to be one penny more than the maximum bid of the competitor below you. Budget Optimizer - a feature that automatically choose your bids to maximize the number of clicks on your ad within your budget. For keyword campaigns with CPC bid- ding only. Clickthrough Rate (CTR): a metric that helps evaluate ads performance. Relevant ads= more clicks = higher CTR. AdWords calculates CTR as follows: Ad Clicks/Impressions x 100. Conversion Rate - the percentage of visitors who take a desired action (buy a product, sign up for an email list, etc.). Cost-per-click (CPC): the AdWords pricing model for contextually targeted ads. You are charged for each click on your ads. CPM (Cost-Per-Impression): the AdWords pricing model for site targeted ads. You are charged each time your ad appears on a page, whether a visitor clicks on it or not. You set the maximum price you want to pay for every thousand impressions. Display URL: The fourth line of every AdWords text ad. It must be a website, with an appropriate extension (.com, .net, etc.). A leading http:// and www are not required. It must indicate the destination URL, but does not need to match the actual the landing page exactly. Impression - An advertisement's appearance on an accessed Web page. For example, if the page you're on shows three ads, that's three impressions. IP (IP Address) - An identifier for a computer or device on a TCP/IP network. The for- mat of an IP address is a numeric address written as four numbers separated by peri- ods. Each number ranges from 0 to 255. Google uses IP address to help determine the location of a computer. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 14 of 68
  15. 15. Hits - The retrieval of any item, like a page or a graphic, from a Web server. For exam- ple, when a visitor calls up one Web page with four graphics, that's five hits, one for the page and four for the graphics. For this reason, hits often aren't a good indication of Web traffic. Inactive Keywords: Poorly performing keywords with a low Quality Score can become inactive for search. These keywords will stop triggering your ad on Google and the search network. You can reactivate such keywords by increasing your Quality Score or raising your maximum cost per click amounts. Keyword - the terms you specify that can trigger your ad. This can be a single word or a phrase. Keyword Matching - Broad - default setting. Will trigger your ad whenever it appears within a searcher’s query. It includes variations and synonyms of the keyword. - Phrase -triggers your ad for any query that includes your keyword or phrase in the exact sequence and form that you specify. Enclose your keyword(s) in quotes. - Exact - the most precise targeting method. Triggers your ad only on a query that exactly matches the keyword or phrase. Enclose your keywords in square brack- ets. - Negative - keywords that prevent your ad from appearing when a search includes a keyword that isn't relevant to your ad. Add a minus sign (-) before the keyword or phrase you want restrict. Landing Page - the page on your website that your advertisement links to. Minimum bid: The amount assigned to a given keyword in your account based on its quality (or Quality Score). The minimum bid is usually the least amount you can pay per click in order for your keyword to show ads. Page View - A Web page that has been viewed by one visitor. Page views are often used in online advertising, where advertisers use the number of page views a site re- ceives to determine where and how to advertise. Paid Inclusion - A search engine marketing model in which a Web site pays a fee to a search engine that then guarantees that the Web site will be displayed in the returned search results for specifically named search terms. Different search engines treat paid inclusion results differently; some indicate the paid inclusion results as advertisements while others display them as results alongside non-paid search results. Position Preference: the ability to specify where you’d prefer your ad to show among all the AdWords ads on a given page. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 15 of 68
  16. 16. Quality Score: Quality Score is the basis for measuring the quality of your keyword and determining your minimum bid. Quality Score is determined by your keyword's click- through rate (CTR), relevance of your ad text, historical keyword performance, and other relevancy factors. The higher your Quality Score, the lower your minimum bid and price you'll pay per click. Return on Investment (ROI) or Return on Ad Spend (ROAS) - an accounting formula used to obtain an actual or perceived future value of an expense or investment. Your ROI can be calculated as revenue from sales, minus advertising costs, all divided by the cost of advertising. Example: If your advertising costs for the past week were $500 and you've sold $1,000 worth of inventory as a result, you have a 100% ROI for the week. The formula: $1,000 (revenue) minus $500 (ad costs); divided by $500 (ad costs). To express ROI as a percentage, multiply the result by 100. Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs) - the Web page that a search engine returns with the results of its search. SEM (Search Engine Marketing) - describes acts associated with researching, sub- mitting and positioning a Web site within search engines to achieve maximum exposure of a website. SEO (Search Engine Optimization) - the process of increasing the number of visitors to a website by ranking high in the search engine results pages. The higher a website ranks, the greater the chance that that site will be visited. Site Targeted Ads: An alternative to keyword-targeted campaigns, site targeting lets you choose specific websites in the Google Network where your ads might run. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 16 of 68
  17. 17. Account Navigation Ways to Create an Account: Starter Edition: Starter Edition is a simplified version of AdWords to advertise a single product. Starter Edition provides a one-page signup and a simplified account. There are no Ad Groups, image ads, CPC bidding or advanced features. Starter Edition advertis- ers write their ad text, target locations and keywords and choose monthly budget. The Google Budget Optimizer is enabled automatically to determine when to show the ads to earn the most clicks possible within the monthly budget. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 17 of 68
  18. 18. Standard Edition: This is the full version of Google AdWords. This account provides you all the advanced tools and features available. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 18 of 68
  19. 19. Proper Account Structure An AdWords account is structured like this: 1. Account - general information about advertiser, billing information 2. Campaigns (up to 25 per account) - set daily budget, target languages and loca- tions, set distribution preferences 3. Ad Groups (up to 100 per campaign) - sets of ads and keywords Successful advertisers tend to build many small, highly targeted Ad Groups around their products, services or keywords. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 19 of 68
  20. 20. Understanding Campaign, Ad Group, and Keyword Statistics Campaign Statistics - All Campaigns When you first login to your AdWords account, you will see a performance summary for all of your campaigns. Each campaign will be listed, as well as its status (Active, Paused, Deleted), the current budget, the number of clicks the campaign has received, the number of impressions, the clickthrough rate, the average cost per click and the to- tal cost. You can: • Specify a timeframe or date range • View all campaigns, only active campaigns or all but deleted. • You can make changes to a specific campaign by checking the box next to its name and taking the appropriate action (pause, resume, delete, edit settings). AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 20 of 68
  21. 21. Campaign Statistics - Specific Campaign Click on the campaign name you wish to review. You will see an overview of the cam- paign, including its Ad Groups. For each Ad Group you can see status (Active, Paused, Deleted), the default bid (maximum cost per click), the number of clicks received, the number of impressions received, clickthrough rate, the average cost per click, the total cost, and the average position of the ad on a search results page. You can: • Specify a timeframe or date range. • View all Ad Groups, only active, or all but deleted. • You can make changes to a specific Ad Groups by checking the box next to its name and taking the appropriate action (pause, resume, delete, edit settings). MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 21 of 68
  22. 22. Ad Group Statistics Click on the Ad Group you wish to review. You will see an overview of the Ad Groups separated on three tabs. The default tab view is Summary. Click on the tabs at the right to view Keywords and Ad Variations. The summary page shows the status, current bid, click received, impressions received, average cost per click, total cost and average ad position. The data is split to show results on Google & the search network (if the search network is enabled) as well as the content network (if enabled). You can specify a time- frame or date range. Summary Page MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 22 of 68
  23. 23. The Keyword tab shows detailed statistics about each keyword in your Ad Group, in- cluding its status (active or inactive for search), current bid (maximum cost per click), number of clicks, number of impressions, average cost per click, total cost and average ad position on a search results page. Keyword Page MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 23 of 68
  24. 24. The Ad Variations tab shows a breakdown of each ad’s performance. You will see the ads, their status, the percentage served (compared to other ad variations), number of clicks, number of impressions, clickthrough rate and cost. The numbers will also be bro- ken down by the content network and the search network, if opted in. Ad Variations Page MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 24 of 68
  25. 25. Edit Campaign Settings You can edit campaign settings by either: • (For accounts with multiple campaigns) From the main “Campaign Management” page, selecting the campaign to edit and clicking the “Edit Settings” button. • From within the campaign statistics page, click on the “Edit Campaign Settings” link. You will see the Edit Campaign Settings page: From here you can: • Rename your campaign • View start date • Set an end date • Adjust campaign daily budget and find recommended budget AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 25 of 68
  26. 26. • Set a delivery method • Choose manual bidding or select the Budget Optimizer • Schedule ads by time of day/day of week • Specify a position preference • Specify how your ads should be served (Show better-performing ads more often, • Opt in or out of Google’s search results pages, search network results pages, con- tent network, and set separate bids for content network clicks. • Target audience by language • Target audience by location Remember to click “Save Changes” when you have finished. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 26 of 68
  27. 27. Edit Cost Per Clicks - Manual Bidding Advertisers have two budget options for non-site-targeted ads, the Budget Optimizer (automatically chooses your bids to maximize the number of clicks based on your budget, using an algorithm) and manual bidding, which allows you to set your own bids. To set a maximum CPC for an Ad Group, go to the Ad Group Summary page. Click the “edit” link under Current Bid: Adjust the maximum bid and save changes: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 27 of 68
  28. 28. To set a maximum CPC for individual keywords, go to the Ad Group Keywords page. Select the keyword(s) you wish to edit and click the “Edit Keyword Settings” button. Note: you may also edit the entire Ad Group CPC by clicking the “edit” link under Cur- rent Bid: Adjust the maximum bids for individual keywords and save changes. You may also as- sign individual landing pages for each keyword. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 28 of 68
  29. 29. Account Tools AdWords has a suite of account management tools. To access all the tools, click on the “Tools” link under the Campaign Management tab. The tools are grouped by purpose: optimizing ads, modifying campaigns and analyzing ad performance. Optimize Your Ads • Keyword Tool - helps you generate targeted keywords. • Edit Campaign Negative Keywords - helps you manage negative keywords at the campaign level. It also includes a “Clean Sweep” tool to remove negative keywords from the Ad Group level and add them at the campaign level. • Site Exclusion - allows you to prevent your ads from showing up on specific websites in the content network. • Traffic Estimator - shows how often your ads may appear for certain keywords. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 29 of 68
  30. 30. Modify Your Campaign • Copy or Move Keywords and Ad Text - helps you reorganize your campaigns by copying or moving keywords and ad text to another Ad Group in your account. • Advanced Search and Editing - helps you locate ad text, keywords, and Max CPCs across your entire account. You can apply changes to your search results. Analyze Your Ad Performance • Ads Diagnostic Tool - if you can't see your ads, use this tool to see if your ad is currently running. This tool reports whether an ad is appearing on the first page of search results and identifies why a particular ad or group of ads may not be showing. • Disapproved Ads - shows you if any of your ads have been disapproved and why. • Conversion Tracking - tracking to collect data about sales, leads, and other user activity resulting from your ads. • My Change History - browse changes made to the account in the last three months. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 30 of 68
  31. 31. Billing & Reports Report Center AdWords reports are collections of statistics that help advertisers analyze the perform- ance of their ad campaigns, identifying trends over time. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 31 of 68
  32. 32. Report Center Features • Reports can be customized with configurable columns and performance filters. • Reports can run on a regular schedule or on demand. • Reports can be run hourly to examine performance by time of day. • Reports can be viewed online or downloaded and opened in Excel. • Reports can be emailed to you on a regular schedule. • Advertisers can save report templates, to easily re-run reports with the desired columns and filtered. • Last five reports are saved. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 32 of 68
  33. 33. Types of Reports The AdWords Report Center can help you generate reports on specific areas: • Keyword Performance: Displays details on selected keywords and organizes statistics by keyword. • Ad Performance: Displays statistics by ad, allowing you to compare the per- formance of different messages. You can select the ad format (Text Ad, Image Ad, Mobile Text Ad, Local Business Ad) • URL Performance: Displays statistics and measures the performance of Desti- nation URLs. • Ad Group Performance: Organizes statistics for each of your Ad Groups. • Campaign Performance: Organizes statistics for each of your campaigns. • Account Performance: Generates statistics for your entire account, or for a por- tion of your account. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 33 of 68
  34. 34. To Create a Report Click on the “Create Report” link under the Reports tab. Step 1: Report Type 1. Report Type: Select from the list of options. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 34 of 68
  35. 35. Step 2: Settings 1. View (Unit of Time): Summary, daily, monthly, quarterly, yearly. 2. Date Range: Select a general date range or data for specific dates. 3. Campaigns and Ad Groups: Include all campaigns, individual campaigns or Ad Groups. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 35 of 68
  36. 36. Step 3: Advanced Settings (Optional) 1. Add or Remove Columns: Customize data for your report. Click Add or Remove Columns link to see available data for report type (Impressions, Clicks, CTR, Aver- age CPC, Cost, Average Position, Campaign, Daily Budget, Campaign Status, Ad Group, Ad Group Status, Headline, Display URL, etc.). 2. Filters Your Results: Customize your report by filtering up to four data types. To create report filters, click Display only rows that match specific criteria. Then choose and customize up to four relevant data types, including Ad Distribution, Status, Match Type, Site/ Keyword, Average Position, Clicks, Cost, Average CPC, CTR, and Impressions. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 36 of 68
  37. 37. Step 4: Templates, Scheduling and Email 1. Name Your Report: Name your report and check the box to Save this as a report template if you want to run duplicate reports in the future. 2. Scheduling: If you want to run this report on a regular basis, check the box to schedule automatic reports and choose a delivery schedule: daily, every Monday or the first day of each month). 3. Email: You can opt for an email notification when your report is ready (for multi- ple email addresses, separate each with a comma). If you want your report at- tached to the email, check select your preferred report format. Step 5: Create Report 1. Click the Create Report button; your report will be ready within a few minutes. You can leave the Reports section and return later to retrieve it. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 37 of 68
  38. 38. Billing Summary Page On the Billing Summary page you'll see your billing history and invoices. Access de- tailed information about each invoice by clicking the invoice number link. 1. Month: The month of reported activity. 2. Date: The date of payment activity. 3. Activity: Adjustments, charges, or declined payments during the reported month, and unique invoices for each payment toward your account. 4. Credits: Costs per campaign itemized by the date billed and invoice number. Ad- justments are also itemized (promotional credits, credits for invalid charges to- ward your account, and courtesy credits). 5. Charges: Subtotaled charges for the current month. 6. Balance: May be carried forward or outstanding, depending on the last payment made. The amount shown reflects reported costs accrued and may not reflect the AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 38 of 68
  39. 39. most recent clicks or impressions. If the balance is zero, then you have recently made a payment and additional charges have yet to be reported. Each invoice has a Payment Received link. Click to view the Payment Details page. For more details about a specific payment, click the invoice number that you wish to re- view (after the Payment Received link) 1. Invoice Details: Invoice/payment date and time, taxes and invoice number. 2. Account Adjustments and Fees: Applicable fees (account activation or re- activation). Adjustments are also itemized (promotional credits, credits toward your account, and courtesy credits). 3. Advertising Costs Charged To This Invoice: • Campaign: campaign for which activity was recorded. • Date Range • Billable Activity: Explanation of charges (clicks, impressions, or over- delivery credit). AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 39 of 68
  40. 40. • Amount of Activity: The number of clicks or impressions accrued. • Budget: The daily budget for the delivery period shown. • Amount: Charges accrued during the delivery period shown. This amount may also include over-delivery adjustments. • Total: Subtotals appear per campaign; the final line represents total advertis- ing charges for the invoice. Click Printable invoice to print an invoice for your records. Over-Delivery • Google may allow up to 20 percent more clicks in one day than a daily budget allows. • They will not charge you more than your daily budget multiplied by the number of days in that delivery period. • If over-delivery exceeds specified budget, the account will receive a credit listed on the invoice as over-delivery credit. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 40 of 68
  41. 41. Credit Card Declines • Advertisers are notified via email if a credit card has been declined. • Detailed information is available on the Payment Declined Details page. It in- cludes itemized details by invoice, including the date and amount of the at- tempted charge, and the reason they were unable to process the payment. If your card is declined, check the following: • Correct credit card number? • Correct expiration date? Has that date passed? • Correct billing address and phone number? Address and phone number listed in the account should match information associated with credit card. • Exceeded the credit limit? Your credit card must have enough available credit to cover your monthly advertising budget. To process a declined charge and reactivate an account, billing information must be up- dated, even if the credit card information did not change. Once the payment is proc- essed the ads will run again. To avoid interruption of your ad campaign, enter a backup credit card on the Billing Preferences page. If your primary card is declined your ads won’t stop running. Pending Charges • Pending charges are determined by the number of clicks received since last billed. • Outstanding balance provides an estimate for upcoming charges. The outstand- ing balance is updated throughout the day, and includes deductions for over- delivery credits. This balance may be more than what you are actually charged for the time period, as additional credits may be applied. • If you pause or delete campaigns, it is important to note that pending charges will be charged to at the end of the billing period. AdWords runs on a 30-day billing cycle, so campaigns may be billed up to one month after pausing or deleting them. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 41 of 68
  42. 42. Billing Cycle • A credit card is charged based on the AdWords billing cycle. The AdWords billing period is defined by Google and is not the billing period of the credit card. • When you create and activate an account with a credit or debit card, Google starts running your ads almost immediately. • Google charges you every 30 days unless your advertising costs reach a certain threshold within the 30-day cycle. How Charges Work: • Google won't charge you before 30 days unless you accrue $50 worth of clicks or impressions. • The first time your account reaches $50 within 30 days, Google will charge you. • Then, Google will let you accrue $200 worth of clicks before charging you within the next 30 days. • If you reach the $200 limit within 30 days, Google will charge you and raise your credit limit to $350. • Once you reach the $350 limit, you'll be charged again, and your limit will be raised to $500, the maximum allowed. • The amount billed may be in excess of the limit since ads continue to run and generate charges between the time the billing cycle is triggered and the time the charge is completed. • The activation fee, along with any other advertising costs accrued, is charged to your credit card at the end of your first billing period. At the end of your billing period, you will be charged for all costs accrued during that cy- cle. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 42 of 68
  43. 43. Beginning Optimization Choosing Keywords The core component of every AdWords account is the set of keywords used in a cam- paign. A thoughtful approach to building keywords and their corresponding Ad Groups can help connect your ad with potential customers. Google rewards better ad cam- paigns by lowering the cost of ad clicks and upping the ad’s position. Effective campaigns usually: • Have targeted Ad Groups with specific sets of keywords for the featured service or product. • Use a combination of keyword match types: exact, broad, phrase and negative matching. • Avoid single term, broad matched keywords unless the word is relatively specific (Example: “flower” versus “chrysanthemum”). Building a Keyword List: 1. Brainstorm your business. What keywords come to mind immediately? 2. Review your website. Are there additional keywords you can use? 3. Think like a customer. What types of phrases would your potential customers use? 4. Focus. What differentiates your business? 5. Include plural and singular versions of your keywords. 6. Include common spelling mistakes and variations on your keywords. 7. Include product numbers and codes. 8. Use Google’s AdWords Keyword Tool. Find variations of your keyword. Review their suggestions not only for possible additions, but possible negative keywords as well. 9. Look at other keyword tools for more ideas. Yahoo! Search Marketing has free a “Keyword Selector Tool” located at: http://inventory.overture.com/d/searchinventory/suggestion/. There is a popular paid service called Wordtracker that can help. Free trials available at: http://www.wordtracker.com/free-trial.html 10. Be aware of industry buzzwords in the media. 11. Organize, organize, organize! AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 43 of 68
  44. 44. Keyword Matching Types Broad - default setting. It is the least targeted option and usually will not convert well for general, single term keywords. But, it will give your ad the widest reach possible. Your ad will show up whenever the keywords, in any order, show up within a searcher’s query. It includes variations and synonyms of the keyword. Example: milk delivery service Would show your ad when people searched for: • milk delivery service • fresh milk delivery service • service for milk delivery • milk delivery service in the boston area • delivery service for transporting milk cows across country Phrase -This setting allows you to specify an exact phrase and a word order for your keywords. The person's query can contain terms on either side of the phrase, but the phrase itself must be present. To indicate a phrase match, enclose your keywords in quotes. Example: “milk delivery service” Would show your ad when people searched for: • milk delivery service • fresh milk delivery service • milk delivery service in the boston area • fresh milk delivery services Exact - the most precise targeting method. Triggers your ad only on a query that exactly matches the keyword or phrase. Enclose your keywords in square brackets. Example: [milk delivery service] Would show your ad when people searched for: • milk delivery service AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 44 of 68
  45. 45. Negative - keywords that prevent your ad from appearing when a search includes a keyword that isn't relevant to your ad. Add a minus sign (-) before the keyword or phrase you want restrict. Examples: -free, -organic, -cow, -boston Would NOT show your ad when people searched for: • free milk delivery service • organic milk delivery service • milk delivery service in the boston area • milk cow delivery services Note on Inactive Keywords AdWords will analyze the performance of a keyword on Google search to determine its relevance. If Google determines it does not have a high enough Quality Score and maximum CPC, it may become “inactive for search.” In this case, you can either raise your bid, optimize the keyword, ad text, or campaign, or delete the word from your list. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 45 of 68
  46. 46. Exercises: Generate keywords for the following examples. Include as many appropriate match types as you can. Scenario One: You sell a variety of trendy maternity and nursing clothes, custom-made baby slings, and cool baby clothes. You do not have a physical location; all your products are sold through your website. Customers are directed to an online form to purchase and submit size/color specifications for the baby slings. KEYWORDS: Scenario Two: You own a moving company that specializes in moving pianos and other fragile objects. You are based in Stoneham, MA (near Boston). You will pick up and deliver pianos any- where in Massachusetts, and a hundred mile radius around the state (New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island. You have a website with information about your company and a form for customers to fill out to request a quote. KEYWORDS: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 46 of 68
  47. 47. Scenario Three: Your OWN business. Create a list of keywords that could bring potential customers to your website. KEYWORDS: MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 47 of 68
  48. 48. Creating Compelling Ad Text A typical AdWords ad has the following format: • Ad title (25 characters maximum, including spaces) • Two description lines (35 characters maximum each line, including spaces) • Display URL (name of website, 35 characters maximum, including spaces) Certain wide characters and double-byte characters will reduce the number of characters permitted per line. The Takeaway: You cannot fit your entire sales pitch into 95 characters. Focus on one special offer, service or product. Include a call to action, and anything that differentiates you. Poorly performing ads are vague and/or poorly written. Successful ads are well- written, specific and compelling. Optimization Tips and Techniques to Try: • Personalization (targeting ad text to very specific searches). • Testing ad text variations - slight changes, different calls to action, unique copy. • Use keywords in title or text (avoid putting your company name in title unless it’s a big brand). • Link to the most appropriate landing page - homepage is not always best. • Include a call to action, such as 'buy', 'order' and 'purchase.’ • Try including the price for a product. • Obey Google’s editorial guidelines: https://adwords.google.com/select/guidelines.html About Ad Variations AdWords offers an optimized ad serving option. Here's how it works: When you have more than one ad in an Ad Group, ads will show equally. As a particular ad achieves better CTR, AdWords will automatically show the higher performing ad more frequently. To activate optimized ad serving: Login to your account, select the campaign, then click “Edit Campaign Settings.” On this page, you can select one of two ad serving options. You can select the checkbox next to Optimize: Show better-performing ads more often to enable your better performing ads to show more often than ads with lower CTRs. Or, you can select the checkbox next to Rotate: Show all ads equally to serve each ad evenly regardless of performance. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 48 of 68
  49. 49. Exercises: Generate ad text for the following examples. Scenario One: You repair electronics, specializing in XBox repair. You have a shop in San Mateo and people also ship broken equipment to you from around the west coast. Your website [www.xbox-repair-shop.com] includes directions to your shop, instructions for shipping equipment in need of repair, and a popular email newsletter and blog about XBox re- lated news and information. AD TEXT: Scenario Two: You sell theme party supplies through your website [www.theme-parties-for-you.com]. You offer a wide variety of packages based on holidays, popular children’s characters, special events, themes (beach party, luau, Texas BBQ) etc. You are trying to push sales for Oktoberfest party supplies. Your package includes a CD of Oompah music, blue and white decorations, plastic steins, aprons and suspenders. You offer rush delivery and your package is priced $35 less than your biggest competitor. AD TEXT: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 49 of 68
  50. 50. Scenario Three: Your OWN business. Write ad text that could bring potential customers to your website. AD TEXT: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 50 of 68
  51. 51. Optimize By Language and Location How Does Google Know Where People Are and What Language They Speak? Google has the ability to figure out – in most cases – where a searcher is geographically located. They first look at the domain being searched on to figure out what country the searcher is from (.com for U.S., .es for Spain, etc.) You can see a list here: http://www.google.com/language_tools AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 51 of 68
  52. 52. Then they use the computer’s Internet Protocol (IP) address, which is assigned by an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Thirdly, Google will try to identify a location in the search terms, like “Nashville Realtors.” For a searcher, Google’s ability to target ads makes the service highly relevant. If you live in Boston and your back is sore, you might go to Google.com and search for “mas- sage therapist.” Google has the ability to display ads targeted to your geographic area. And, if you searched for “massage therapist boston” Google could do the same. So, in the same way that this ability to deliver relevant ads helps the user, it helps you, the advertiser. If you have a massage therapy practice in Boston, it does you little good if your ad is shown to searchers in Honolulu. Google’s ability to target ads on such a granular level can help your business, particularly if your products and customers have geographic restrictions. It helps you to reach qualified prospects without wasting your money. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 52 of 68
  53. 53. Overall, the geographical accuracy is very good. According to Maxmind, an industry- leading provider of geolocation and online fraud detection tools, their own data can ac- curately identify a user’s location by IP address 99 percent of the time on a country level, 85 percent on a state level and 80 percent within a 25 mile radius in the U.S. [http://www.maxmind.com/app/city]. Google presumably has comparable accuracy be- cause they have a vested interest in relevant searches. The better the results are, the more likely searchers will continue to use Google, the more likely advertisers will be seen (and their ads clicked on). There are situations when Google may not be able to correctly identify where a user is located. Reasons include: • The searcher’s ISP prevents Google from identifying an IP address. • The IP address doesn't match the location of the searcher. So, a computer lo- cated in Atlanta might be mistaken for a computer in Destin, Florida. • And, if Google does not recognize a city or town, you won’t be able to target an ad there. Google’s ability to figure out where the people are, and your ability to target your ads there, makes Google AdWords an extremely powerful advertising tool. You no longer have to cast as wide a net as possible to communicate with potential customers. In fact, it can be to your benefit to target the most specific area possible. This lesson will take you through the steps to create an effective local campaign. Language Targeting Use language-specific targeting if your audience speaks a particular languages. Be- cause people speak many different languages within a location, an effective way to reach them is to target by language. Visit the Edit Campaign Settings page to target one, several, or all languages. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 53 of 68
  54. 54. Setting Up Location Targeting First Question - What Type of Campaign Is Best for My Business? Before we create a regionally targeted ad, an important step is to consider who your customers are and where your products and services are sold. If your business targets a state or a metro region, you can choose to display ads to these locations only. If your customer base is even more targeted, say within a certain radius, or in a small geo- graphic area – for example, a local courier service – then a custom, locally targeted ad campaign probably makes the most sense for you. And, you may need both local and national or international campaigns. How Do I Target My Potential Customers? AdWords allows you to geographically target your campaign in the following ways: • By country • By region/state/city (not available for all countries) • Radius from single point on a map Setting Up a Local Campaign by Region/State/City Let’s use Jason, an organic farmer from Ithaca, New York as our example. He grows soybeans, which he makes into fresh tofu and sells at a single local market. The product is not sold anywhere else or shipped to other locations. Jason’s fresh tofu is a good fit for a local ad campaign. Jason would choose to display this ad to people searching for “fresh organic tofu” within a 50-mile radius of the farmers market. But, Jason may also sell packets of seeds to a na- tional market. In this case, he would create a separate, nationally targeted campaign touting “organic soybean seeds.” The following pages show how to setup a local cam- paign. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 54 of 68
  55. 55. How To Do It: 1. Make a New Campaign: From the “Campaign Management” tab, click on the link: “Create a new campaign: keyword-targeted.” 2. Give it a Name, Identify Your Customers: Name your new campaign and Ad Group and select your target language(s). At the bottom you’ll see a section ti- tled: “Target customers by location.” If you’d like to set up a local campaign and target a city, select the “Regions and cities” option and click “Continue.” AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 55 of 68
  56. 56. 3. Select Your Target Location(s): The next page allows you to select states and/ or cities within states. A quick look at New York shows that Ithaca is not listed. But, there is a box below that allows you to type in city names. So, type in “Ith- aca, NY” and click “Continue.” Google recognized Ithaca, NY and sends you to the next page. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 56 of 68
  57. 57. 4. Ad Text: The next step is to create your ad text. Because this campaign will be locally targeted to Ithaca, it should be written differently than a campaign targeted to a wide area. For example, if you could reasonably assume that most people living in Ithaca would know where “Jason’s Farmers Market” was, an ad mention- ing it, targeted to Ithaca, would make sense. However, if the same ad was also shown to searchers in New York City, most would probably have no idea where “Jason’s Farmers Market” was located. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 57 of 68
  58. 58. 5. Choose Your Keywords: Now you can select the keywords you want to associate with this Ad Group. Remember to keep your keywords as focused as possible. The more closely they match the product you’re trying to sell, the better return on your investment. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 58 of 68
  59. 59. 6. Set Your Budget: The next step asks for your daily budget and your maximum desired cost per click. Once you’ve entered this information, click “Continue.” AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 59 of 68
  60. 60. 7. Review Selections: You now have an opportunity to review all the information you entered. You can make any changes from this page or click “Save Campaign” to save your changes. You can also select “Create Another Ad Group,” which will allow you to create another group in the same campaign (i.e. the same geo- graphic targeting). Congratulations! You created your first locally targeted campaign for Ithaca, NY. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 60 of 68
  61. 61. Creating a Campaign with a Customized Location – A Radius Around a Single Lo- cation Your campaign for Jason’s tofu targets Ithaca, but you realize that some customers are traveling from areas beyond Ithaca’s city limits, and the campaign may be too narrow. So, you decide to create a new campaign that displays his ad for fresh tofu to searchers in a 50-mile radius from the farmers market. Let’s go through the steps to set up this ad campaign. 2. Create a New Campaign: From the “Campaign Management” tab, click on the link: “Create a new campaign: keyword-targeted” 3. Give it a Name, Identify Your Customers: Name your new campaign and Ad Group and select your target language(s). At the bottom you’ll see a section ti- tled: “Target customers by location.” Select the “Customized” option and click “Continue.” AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 61 of 68
  62. 62. 3. Select Your Target Location(s): On this page you can target customers in a circu- lar area around your location. You can do this by: • Entering a physical address • Selecting a point on the map Let’s begin with option A. Enter a physical address for Jason’s Farmers Market. To preview the map, click on “Map this location.” If it looks correct, move to step 2, defining the area. Google recom- mends a minimum area of 20 miles or 35 kilometers. For Jason’s ad, let’s enter a 50- mile radius. Then click “Map this area” to preview the target area on the map. If it looks correct, click “Continue.” AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 62 of 68
  63. 63. Repeat steps 4 through 7 outlined in the last section: 4. Create Ad Text 5. Choose Your Keywords 6. Set Your Budget 7. Review Selections and Save Campaign Now, let’s back up to step 4 and help Jason target customers in another way. Instead of entering an address, let’s try option B, selecting a point on a map. This option allows you to find coordinates by using the map. Follow these steps: • Click and drag the map to your region. • Use (+) and (-) keys to zoom in or out. • Center the marker on your location. Your ads will appear in a circular area around this point. • Coordinates will appear below automatically. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 63 of 68
  64. 64. Once you’ve found your target area on the map, enter the radius in miles or kilometers where you’d like that ad to appear. Then click “Map this area” to preview. If it looks correct, click “Continue.” Again, repeat steps 4 through 7: 4. Create Ad Text 5. Choose Your Keywords 6. Set Your Budget 7. Review Selections and Save Campaign Now, let’s back up to step 4 one last time and create a custom area using the advanced multi-point option. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 64 of 68
  65. 65. Creating a Campaign with a Customized Location – Multi-Point Option Google AdWords also allows advertisers to specify a non-circular area to target ads. This option would be useful for Jason if he offers a local delivery service for his fresh tofu. Using the polygon tool, he could delineate his delivery area and target his ads to searchers within it. Let’s set one up. Look under the map image for the box that says: “Advanced option – Skip to our multi- point option where you’ll enter a list of coordinates to define a non-circular area.” AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 65 of 68
  66. 66. Click on the “multi-point option” link and you will see a similar page: This page is similar to the last map page, but instead of selecting a single point on the map, you can pick three or more points to define a target area of any size and shape. • Click and drag the map to your region. • Use (+) and (-) keys to zoom in or out. • Click map points to outline the local area you want. • Lines of the polygon cannot cross. Re-click any point to remove it. Click “Clear polygon” to start over. If you happen to know your coordinates, you could enter them manually in the box, one pair per line. Use an asterisk (*) to designate degrees. Most of us will click on the map and Google will handle the coordinates for us. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 66 of 68
  67. 67. Once you have mapped out the area, click “Continue.” Again, repeat steps 4 through 7: 4. Create Ad Text 5. Choose Your Keywords 6. Set Your Budget 7. Review Selections and Save Campaign That’s it! You’ve setup your local campaign. AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 67 of 68
  68. 68. MY NOTES: AdWords™ Seminar for Success - Copyright 2007, Sitening LLC Page 68 of 68

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