THE OIL AND GAS SECTOR: Standardardization of oil products and biofuels in particular

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Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Alexander Buchsbaum | Senior Expert, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH, lecture was held at "RUSSIA:AUSTRIA - Driving change for innovation and growth: raising standards in Russia, in …

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Alexander Buchsbaum | Senior Expert, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH, lecture was held at "RUSSIA:AUSTRIA - Driving change for innovation and growth: raising standards in Russia, in Austria and in their trade relations", 2nd of November 2011,
Vienna, Austria, Conference hosted by Austrian Standards

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  • OMV Inhalt – noch offene Punkte: - OMV Input: Bitte noch um genaue Bezeichnung POAS  würden hier gerne noch eine Fußnote ergänzen. OMV Input: Check aktuelle Zahlen ergänzen OMV Entscheidung: welche Punkte sollen hier enthalten bleiben?
  • On this list you can see the GHG savings for ethanol and Biodiesel The green coloured fields shows the available products, the white coloured are not in production Very crucial for the GHG-saving value is the CO2 balance of the production process Default Values should be used for Biofuels produced outside the EC EC produced biofuels shall be certified and use actual values Benefit of 29 gCO 2 eq ./MJ for Biomass from degraded land Higher GHG Efficiency means less Substitution of Fossils

Transcript

  • 1. Russia:Austria Conference 2011 Dr. Alexander Buchsbaum Hosted by | Veranstaltet von Austrian Standards In co-operation with In Kooperation mit OMV Refining & Marketing
  • 2. Standardization of Automotive Fuels in Austria as part of EU and as member of CEN
    • Standardization Committee (ON-K 024) “Petroleum products and synthetic and plant substitutes derived thereof”
      • Convenor: Dr. Alexander Buchsbaum, OMV Refining and Marketing GmbH. Committee Manager: Mrs. Bettina Seitl, ASI
    • CEN TC19: Petroleum products, lubricants and related products
  • 3. OMV E&P: Two core countries and a balanced international portfolio OMV at a glance I OMV milestones during the past decade l Business segments
  • 4. OMV G&P: Well positioned in central and southeastern Europe
    • Integrated gas and power business
    • Main operator of Austria‘s gas infrastructure (pipelines and storages)
    • Leading wholesale gas company in Austria and Romania
    • One-third of all Russian gas exports to Western Europe flow through Austria
    • Leading the Nabucco gas pipeline project
    • Central European Gas Hub as a virtual gas hub
    • Power plants in the 800 MW class under construction in Romania and Turkey
    OMV at a glance I OMV milestones during the past decade l Business segments G&P at a glance OMV Gas & Power Locations EconGas Locations Petrom Location Adria LNG Central European Gas Hub Power plant projects Target markets (regional clustered) Existing supplies Planned Nabucco Gas Pipeline Potential supplies Moscow Baku Ashgabat Teheran Istanbul Sofia Zagreb Vienna Brussels Gate Terminal Erbil Russia North Sea Caspian Region Middle East North Africa
  • 5. OMV R&M: supplying over 200 mn people with energy
    • Refineries in Austria, Germany and Romania
    • 20% market share in the Danube region
    • High product quality and environmental standards
    • Refining capacity 22.3 mn t per annum
    • Strong retail brand and high-quality, innovative non-oil business (VIVA)
    • Active in 13 countries with around 4,800 filling stations in 2010 (incl. Petrol Ofisi)
    OMV at a glance I OMV milestones during the past decade l Business segments OMV filling station network
  • 6. OMV Business Segments
    • Refining & Marketing (incl. petrochemicals) :
    • Total refining capacity of 22 mn t per annum
    • Filling station network of over 4,800 stations
    • Market share of around 20% in the Danube Region
    • Exploration & Production:
    • Oil and gas production of 318,000 boe/d in 2010
    • Proven oil and gas reserves of 1.15 bn boe as at the end of 2010
    • Operational activities in two core countries, Romania and Austria, as well as in a balanced international portfolio
    • Gas & Power:
    • 2,000 km natural gas pipeline network in Austria
    • Gas-fired power plant projects in Romania and Turkey
    • Gas pipeline network with a marketed capacity of around 89 bcm
    OMV at a glance I OMV milestones during the past decade l Business segments
  • 7. European Standards for Automotive Fuels
    • EN 228: Unleaded petrol
    • EN 590: Diesel
    • EN 589: LPG (Liquefied petroleum gas)
    • EN 14214: Fatty acid methylesters (FAME) for diesel engines
    • Technical documents for
      • E85 (Fuel for Otto-engines containing 85% Ethanol)
    • Under development:
      • CNG compressed natural gas as automotive fuel
      • Bio-methane as automotive fuel
      • Increased volumes of biofuels in petrol and diesel
  • 8. EU: Drivers for Alternative Fuels - Political
    • Security of supply
      • Reduce petroleum dependence in transport sector.
      • How much fossil fuel can be substituted?
      • Is the production of the fuel alternative completely domestic or is import necessary?
    • Environmental impact
      • Does the fuel offer emission reduction potential?
      • Is CO 2 balance better or worse than other alternative fuel options?
    • Supporting the rural economy
      • Use of alternative resources like biomass.
      • Is the production of the fuel alternative completely domestic or is import necessary?
  • 9. Major regulative initiatives shaping the oil industry
    • Renewable Energy Directive (RED):
      • 10 % bio component by energy in road fuels.
      • Sustainability criteria to define acceptable biofuels.
    • Fuel Quality Directive (FQD):
      • 6 % reduction in CO2 content of transport fuels by 2020.
      • Inclusion of detailed fuels specifications in the Directive.
      • Tightening of some key specifications.
    • Energy Tax Directive (ETD) (under development):
      • Taxation of fuels based on energy content
      • Taxation of fuels based on CO2 emissions
    • EU Emission-Trading-System (CO2):
      • Pan European reduction target of 21% for ETS sectors.
      • Extension to many more industry sectors.
      • Full auctioning by 2020, except where carbon leakage can be shown.
      • New entrants allowance, restrictions in future use of CDMs (These are CO2 certificates out of Clean Development Mechanism)
  • 10. EU: Renewable Energy Directive (RED)
    • Share of energy from renewable sources in all forms of transport in 2020 is at least 10 % of the final consumption of energy in transport in that member state.
    • Biofuels from waste, residues, non-food cellulosic material, and ligno-cellulosic material will count twice for RED transport target, but not for the GHG savings
    • The energy content of electricity from renewable energy sources consumed by electric road vehicles will count 2.5 times.
    • Minimum GHG reduction for biofuels 35 % - and 50 % from 2017 on; - 60 % for new installations from 2017 on. - For plants operating in Jan 2008 GHG requirement will start in Apr 2013
    • Harmonised approach with Fuel Quality Directive by identical sustainability criteria
  • 11. EU: Fuels Quality Directive (FQD)
    • Mandatory 6% reduction of CO 2 in energy equivalent content of transport fuels by 2020.
    • Review in 2014
    • Inclusion of detailed fuels specifications in the Directive.
    • Tightening of some key specifications.
    • Electrical vehicles included
    • GHG emissions are based on g CO 2,equiv. /MJ
    • Baseline is calculated on fossil fuel usage in 2010
    • Harmonised approach with Renewable Energy Directive by identical sustainability criteria
    • Enabling more widespread use of ethanol in petrol
    • Protection grade concept until 2013 incl. labelling
    • Derogations for petrol vapour pressure for cold summer conditions and blending in of ethanol.
    • Limitation of metallic additives as MMT.
    • Increase of allowed biodiesel content in diesel to 7% (B7) by volume, with an option for more than 7% with consumer info
    • Reduction of sulphur content of inland waterway fuel in one step to 10 mg/kg by 1 January 2011.
  • 12. Standards for Future Automotive Fuels
    • Existing Standards
    • Petrol:
      • Up to 5% v/v of ethanol
      • Limits for other alcohols and ethers (e.g. ETBE)
      • Oxygen content: 5% Ethanol: max. 2,7 % m/m 10% Ethanol: max. 3,7 % m/m
    • Development needed for targets of the year 2020
    • Petrol:
      • 10% v/v Ethanol
      • 20% v/v Ethanol (in the next step)
      • Increase of the limit for oxygen content in petrol is needed, if more than 10% Ethanol is allowed.
    Sustainability of all these Bio-products? “CO2-footprint”
  • 13. Standards for Future Automotive Fuels
    • Existing Standards
    • Diesel
      • FAME max. 7% v/v
      • Hydrogenated Vegetable Oils accepted
    • Development needed for targets of the year 2020
    • Diesel:
      • FAME max. 10% v/v
      • FAME max. 30% v/v for captive fleets
    Sustainability of all these Bio-products? “CO2-footprint”
  • 14. Quelle: Dr. Böhme The variability of the GHG footprint of fossil fuels is much less than for biofuels (FQD Art.7) Variation in CO2 footprint ~15% Fossil fuel Biofuel Energy to vehicle Production Energy Well-To-Tank Tank-To-Wheel emissions from combustion Well-To-Tank fossil Tank-To-Wheel fossil Tank-To-Wheel renewable ~10% up to >100% Well-ToTank fossil
  • 15. Source: CONCAWE Combustion 85% Refining 8 – 10 % Crude Production 1 – 4 % Distribution & retail 1% Production in Europe covered by ETS Well-to-Tank 15% Tank-to-Wheel 85% Well-to-Wheel 100% The CO2 content of fossil transport fuels
  • 16. Sustainability regulation in Austria Part 2: Delivery of sustainble blended product to the customer Part 1: Biofuel production, providing evidence of sustainability Farmer Storage Oil Crushing mill Biofuel Producer Blender Customer Legal background part 1: „ 250. Verordnung: Landwirtschaftliche Ausgangsstoffe für Biokraftstoffe und flüssige Brennstoffe“ already in place since Dec. 2010 Legal background part 2: Revision of the Kraftstoffverordnung, still in discussion
  • 17. Renewable Energy Directive and Fuels Quality Directive GHG-savings for alternative fuels (Art. 7b) * Pending on CO2-balance for production process Main products on market Fuel type Feedstock GHG-saving [%] Default value GHGs [%] ethanol sugar beet 61 52 wheat 32-69* 16-69* wheat-straw 87 85 corn 56 49 sugar cane 71 71 waste wood 80 74 Biodiesel (FAME) rape seed 45 38 sunflower 58 51 soybean 40 31 palm oil 36-62* 19-56* waste vegetable oil or animal oil 88 83 Fuel type Feedstock GHG-saving [%] Default value GHGs [%] HVO rape seed 51 47 sunflower 65 62 palm oil 40-68* 26-65* BTL (FT) waste wood 95 95 farmed wood 93 93 DME waste wood 95 95 farmed wood 92 92 Biogas as CNG manure 84-86 81-82
  • 18.  
  • 19.
    • prEN 16214: “Sustainably produced biomass for energy applications; Principles, criteria, indicators and verifiers for biofuels and bio liquids”
      • Part1: Terminology Details on the terms and definitions used
      • Part2: Conformity Assessment including chain of custody mass balance method, standard for independent auditing
      • Part3: Biodiversity and environmental aspects
      • Part4: Calculation methods of the GHG emission balance associated with sustainable biofuels and bio liquids, using a life cycle.
      • Part 5: Guidance towards definition of residue and waste via a positive list.
    CEN Sustainability standard
  • 20. International Trade of Biomass Sustainability is a worldwide question, therefore also ISO standards are needed! International trade of Oil products, vegetable oils, wheat and corn Source: Rabobank 2007
  • 21. Summary
    • Automotive fuels contain increasing volumes of bio-components or bio-derived components.
    • The standards for automotive fuels must fit to
      • Legal requirements
      • Technical requirements
      • Consumer requirements
    • There are defined political targets in the European Union
      • Security of supply
      • Environmental impact
      • Supporting the rural economy
    • Biofuels are traded worldwide. International standards are needed.