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Presentation to DASA Director 20120210
 

Presentation to DASA Director 20120210

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  • GARZAThe story of Aunt Martha’s actually begins in 1969, when Park Forest formed a Youth Commission to advise the Village Board about the challenges that the area’s young people were encountering. The Youth Commission was also responsible for recommending strategies to address the needs and challenges it uncovered.In 1972 the Village allocated funds to hire a full-time Youth Worker to:Conduct a more thorough analysis of the needs that had been identified by the Youth Commission; and,Provide guidance and lead the development of programs and initiatives.By the end of 1972, the majority of the Youth Worker’s time was being spent training the volunteers – including youth and adults – who would staff the new walk-in counseling center for runaways and alienated youth. The drop-in center was called Aunt Martha’s, and it opened in December of 1972. The Youth Worker, Gary Leofanti would act as its executive director (in addition to his duties as a Village employee).
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  • GARZAUsers & Encounters by Calendar Year2000 – 3,611 Users – 16,293 Encounters2001 – 4,370 Users – 13,702 Encounters2002 – 6,138 Users – 19,819 Encounters2003 – 10,373 Users – 33,114 Encounters2004 – 16,427 Users – 51,152 Encounters2005 – 24,530 Users – 81,096 Encounters2006 – 35,655 Users – 118,223 Encounters2007 – 54,590 Users – 174,911 Encounters2008 – 62,387 Users – 201,381 Encounters2009 – 79,967 Users – 273,014 Encounters2010 – 84,751 Users – 310,668 Encounters
  • BYRD
  • Primary Care ServicesHealthWorks, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, School-Based Health Care, Immunizations, Laboratory Services, Medication Management & Assistance, HIV/AIDS Services, Walk-in ServicesMay want to highlight specialty clinics like Teen Clinic and Men’s Clinic.Women’s Health ServicesFamily Planning, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pre- and Postnatal Care, Immunizations, Pregnancy Tests, Pap Smears, Breast Cancer Screenings, Cervical Cancer ScreeningsOur Women’s Health Services are integrated with programs that provide education, access to other resources in the community and serve as a social support system for many of our patients. (i.e. Healthy Start, Family Case Management, Targeted Intensive Prenatal Case Management and Teen Parent Services)In Calendar Year 2010:Obstetricians & Gynecologists provided almost 29,000 visits;Case Managers and Patient Educators provided more than 13,000 visits.# of Prenatal Care Patients who Delivered in 2010: 1,232
  • Aunt Martha’s Total Cost Per Total Patient is 12% lower than the average for Illinois’ health centers, and 23% lower than the national average.WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?WE SEE MORE PATIENTS AND WE DO IT MORE COST EFFECTIVELY THAN THE COMPETITION.
  • KEY POINTS:Care Management ModelPersonal Dental QuestionnaireCalendar Year 2010 Stats:25,248 Patients55,539 Visits, including: - 26,320 oral exams - 11,693 restorative procedures - 5,994 extractions and other surgical proceduresFACTS ABOUT KIDS ORAL HEALTH CAREDental care is the single greatest unmet need for health services among children.Every year, 17 million disadvantaged children do not receive the dental care they need.Tooth decay is the most common childhood disease. It affects nearly 60 percent of children.80 percent of dental disease is concentrated in just 25 percent of children – those who come from poor families that face disproportionately high barriers to getting care.
  • Nearly 30% of our health center patients received dental services in CY 2010.State Average: 14.81%National Average: 19.26%Aunt Martha’s Dental Cost Per Dental Patient is 10% lower than the average for Illinois’ health centers, and 34% lower than the national average.WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?WE SEE MORE PATIENTS AND WE DO IT MORE COST EFFECTIVELY THAN THE COMPETITION.
  • Nearly 30% of our health center patients received dental services in CY 2010.State Average: 14.81%National Average: 19.26%Aunt Martha’s Dental Cost Per Dental Patient is 10% lower than the average for Illinois’ health centers, and 34% lower than the national average.WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?WE SEE MORE PATIENTS AND WE DO IT MORE COST EFFECTIVELY THAN THE COMPETITION.
  • Calendar Year 2010 Stats:7,647 Patients, including: - 5,527 (72%) diagnosed with depression or other mood disorders - 1,547 (20%) diagnosed with anxiety disorders - 3,019 (39%) diagnosed with attention deficit and disruptive behavior disorders 35,704 VisitsFACTS ABOUT KIDS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CAREChildren’s Behavioral Health Problems are WidespreadAlmost one in five (1/5) young people have one or more mental, emotional and behavioral disorder.One in 10 youth has mental health problems that are severe enough to impair how they function at home, school or in the community. Early Detection and Intervention Are CriticalResearch supported by the National Institute of Mental Health indicates that half of adults with mental, emotional and behavioral disorders were first diagnosed by age 14 and three-fourths were diagnosed by age 24.Factors that predict mental health problems can be identified in the early years, with children and youth from low-income households at increased risk for mental health problems. Need for Improved and Expanded Mental Health Services for Children & Youth is Well-DocumentedIt is estimated that less than one in five (1/5) children receive the appropriate needed treatment.
  • 9% of our health center patients received mental health services in CY 2010.State Average: 4.30%National Average: 4.38%Aunt Martha’s Mental Health Cost Per Mental Health Patient is 27% lower than the national average.WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?WE SEE MORE PATIENTS AND WE DO IT MORE COST EFFECTIVELY THAN THE COMPETITION.Our psychiatric staff represents 22% of the total psychiatric FTEs in all of Illinois’ community health centers.LIMITATIONS- Ideal continuum for FQHC BH is less seriously mentally ill patients- Who already access the FQHC for medical careEven though We already see well over 100 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia FINANCIAL LIMITATIONS- 330 Funding provides limited funding for uninsured FQHCs cannot be the primary provider of BH services to the Seriously Mentally IllBI-DIRECTIONAL INTEGRATIONGreat potential, but…- Needs to be funded- FQHCs need Change of Scope to provide primary care in CMHC Practice has to recognize that regular productivity is less SUMMARY- FQHCs can be a model for the integration of primary and behavioral healthcare - Successful implementation requires effective systems and management- BH should be integrated into all areas of clinic functioningFQHC-CMHC collaboration is promising but should not be viewed as an alternative to CMHCs for Seriously Mentally Ill
  • 9% of our health center patients received mental health services in CY 2010.State Average: 4.30%National Average: 4.38%Aunt Martha’s Mental Health Cost Per Mental Health Patient is 27% lower than the national average.WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?WE SEE MORE PATIENTS AND WE DO IT MORE COST EFFECTIVELY THAN THE COMPETITION.Our psychiatric staff represents 22% of the total psychiatric FTEs in all of Illinois’ community health centers.LIMITATIONS- Ideal continuum for FQHC BH is less seriously mentally ill patients- Who already access the FQHC for medical careEven though We already see well over 100 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia FINANCIAL LIMITATIONS- 330 Funding provides limited funding for uninsured FQHCs cannot be the primary provider of BH services to the Seriously Mentally IllBI-DIRECTIONAL INTEGRATIONGreat potential, but…- Needs to be funded- FQHCs need Change of Scope to provide primary care in CMHC Practice has to recognize that regular productivity is less SUMMARY- FQHCs can be a model for the integration of primary and behavioral healthcare - Successful implementation requires effective systems and management- BH should be integrated into all areas of clinic functioningFQHC-CMHC collaboration is promising but should not be viewed as an alternative to CMHCs for Seriously Mentally Ill
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  • Services organized from the client’s perspective.Founded as a result of the Park Forest Youth Commission.FQHC designation requires that Board includes patient representation.Care Management Model – personalized assistance to help patients navigate the system.Full integration across continuum of child welfare, juvenile justice, education and health care services.HealthWorks and CRC as examples of how healthcare services have been combined with child welfare services.In Fiscal Year 2011, employees logged more than 1,000 referrals to other programs or services in the Aunt Martha’s system.Aligned with other health care and social service providers in every community.Partnerships with 291 health care, dental and behavioral health-related providers and organizations.Partnerships with 535 education and social service-related providers and organizations.Partnerships with 688 religious institutions and organizations.Partnerships with 385 government, civil service and other institutions and organizations.Integrated IT system to enable communication and simplify access to services.Cross-Integration System, which unifies the records of clients whose service information is maintained in multiple, program-specific systems.Client Referral System.‘Request Appointment’ function on the agency’s website, which is linked to and has logged more than 2,800 requests in the Client Referral System since December 2010.
  • THIS SLIDE IS ABOUT HOW WE ARE EXTENDING OUR RESOURCES BEYOND THE PEOPLE WE SERVE DIRECTLY AND MAKING THEM AVAILABLE TO OTHER ORGANIZATIONS IN THE COMMUNITY.

Presentation to DASA Director 20120210 Presentation to DASA Director 20120210 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome toAunt Martha’s Youth Service Center Theodora Binion, Director Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Illinois Department of Human Services February 10, 2012
  • Organizational Overview Our Mission By the NumbersAunt Martha’s mission is to Founded: 1972be a caring community Locations: 49resource for children, youth Communities Served: 645and families. Budget (Total): $70,612,400 Employees (Total): 1,099 Salaried 935 Volunteer 94 Ind. Contractor 70
  • Organizational Structure Board of Directors Chief Executive President Officer C. Gary Leofanti Raul Garza OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION HEALTHWORKS &COMMUNITY-BASED CHILD WELFARE EDUCATION & EVENING HEALTH CARE Chief Financial SERVICES SERVICES YOUTH SERVICES REPORTING SERVICES Officer CENTERS Chris NordlohSenior Vice President Senior Vice President Vice President Vice President Medical Director Chief Compliance Community-Based Child Welfare Services Education & Youth HealthWorks & Evening Dr. Jennifer Byrd Officer Services Programming Reporting Centers Karen Sneade Mary Martin Jerry Lowell Jill Eitel Dr. Theresa Miller Director Director Health & Dental Health Business Chief Quality Childrens Business Operations Operations Officer Behavioral Health Reception Jamie Dornfeld Gary Bevills Ernie Gonzalez Services Division Center Division Manager Vice President Division Manager Health Care Director Community-Based Residential Services Social Services Policy & Advocacy Services Warren Wood Roshanda Jackson Marsha Conroy Giselle Doyle Community-Based Teen Parenting Services Services Network Division Manager Foster Care Marc Smith
  • Our Employees Gender 20% Average Tenure of 80% Current Employees: 4.21 Years Female MaleRace/Ethnicity Advancing Employee Education 6% Associate’s Degree: 4%26% 50% Bachelor’s Degree: 32% 18% Master’s Degree: 12% MD or Ph.D.: 12% African-American Hispanic or Latino White Other
  • Our History
  • • Drop-In Center• Counseling Services• 1st Foster Homes• Family Planning Services• 1st Group Home• Employment Training
  • The 1980s ‘83 • Program Plus (Parents Learning Universal Skills) ‘85 • Named Head Start Site ‘86 • Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services ‘87 • Project New Chance
  • The 1990s ‘90 ‘96• 4 New Group Homes • School-Linked Health ‘92 Centers in Aurora and• Youth Substance Abuse Chicago Heights Treatment Services ‘94 ‘97• 3 New Group Homes • Joint Commission ‘95 Accreditation• 2 New Group Homes ‘99• Lakehouse Diagnostic • Federally Qualified Health Shelter Center Status• Transitional Living Program
  • The 2000s ‘00 ‘06• Joint Commission Accreditation • Joint Commission Accreditation ‘02 • Health Center• 2 New Health Centers • Residential Shelter (CRC) ‘03 • Group Home• Joint Commission Accreditation ‘07• Health Center • 2 New Health Centers• Transitional Living Program • Transitional Living Program ‘04 ‘08• 2 New Health Centers • 4 New Health Centers ‘05 ‘09• Health Center • 2 New Health Centers• HealthWorks • ARRA Funding (IDS & CIP)• Transitional Living Program
  • • ARRA Funding (FIP)• Chicago Southland Health Conference• Partnering for Solutions Child Welfare Conference• Health Center• Park Forest Hall of Fame• 2nd Annual Partnering for Solutions Child Welfare Conference
  • Adult Education Parents Too Soon (Healthy Families Illinois) Cook County Works Pregnant and Early Learning Center Parenting TeensHome Instruction for Parents Safety Networks of Preschool Youngsters Summer Youth EmploymentiLab – Community Technology Center Teen Parenting Service Network Life Skills Teen Pregnancy Prevention Parenting Classes Work First Parenting Techniques Education Series Youth Participation
  • Basic Center Residential Shelter Emergency Shelter Care Specialized Foster Care Foster Home Licensing Street Outreach Program Homeless Services System of Care Housing Advocacy Traditional Foster Care On Your Own Transitional Living ProgramPathways Independent Living Youth Housing Advocacy Residential Group Home Services
  • Community Counseling Services (Title XX)Comprehensive Community Based Youth ServicesComprehensive Prevention Differential ResponseEvening Reporting Center Gays and Lesbians Advocating Diversity Intact Families Pre-Trial Services
  • Adolescent & Adult Men’s Clinic Substance Abuse Mobile Health Center Treatment Oral Health Behavioral Health Pediatrics Centering Pregnancy Primary CareComprehensive Prevention Recreation & WellnessFamily Case Management Targeted Intensive Prenatal Family Planning Case Management HealthWorks Teen Clinic HIV Prevention Teen Parent Services Illinois Breast & Cervical Women’s Health Services Cancer Program (OB/GYN)
  • Aunt Martha’s Health Center350,000300,000250,000200,000 DEVELOPING LEARNING TO BE A EXPANDING ACCESS TO AN FQHC COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE MODEL150,000 MODEL Patients100,000 Visits 50,000 0 CY CY CY CY CY CY CY CY CY CY CY 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 UDS Reporting Year
  • The People We Serve Aunt Marthas Illinois CHCs All CHCs60.00%50.00%40.00% 55.45% 52.47% 39.74%30.00% 37.67% 31.24% 37.54%20.00% 15.22% 7.51% 10.84%10.00% 5.46% 1.60% 5.28% 0.00% Uninsured Medicaid/CHIP Medicare Other 3rd Party Source: UDS Summary Report – 2010. Grantee, State and National - Universal
  • Primary Care Services Patient Centered Medical Home • Patient-centered, Physician-directed • Care that is effective and efficient Chronic Care Management Model Women’s Health Services Family Planning Obstetrics/GynecologyBreast and Cervical Cancer Screenings
  • Cost Efficient, Comprehensive Services$600 $600 $562 $588$550 $538$500 $510 $518 $451 $477$450 $485$400 $454 $430 $426$350 $374 $300 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Aunt Marthas CHCs in Illinois CHCs in U.S.
  • Oral Health Care Services Cleaning X-Rays Dental Hygiene Fillings Education Sealants Routine Check-ups &Fluoride Treatments Exams Extractions Root Canals Aunt Martha’s Personal Dental Questionnaire 4 Simple Questions Can Make a Difference
  • Cost Efficient, Coordinated Dental Services 60,000 Cost Per Dental Patient $400 50,000 $350 $358 $372 $333 $344 $300 40,000 Patients $274 $250 $247 $248 $259 Visits $255 $200 $249 30,000 $150 $181 $195 20,000 $100 $128 $50 10,000 $- 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 - Aunt Marthas CHCs in Illinois CHCs in U.S. 2004 2006 2008 2010 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Patients 1,257 2,087 3,239 6,179 13,459 15,413 20,294 25,248Visits 2,030 2,412 5,379 10,377 22,546 30,902 44,713 55,539
  • Cost Efficient, Coordinated Dental Services 60,000 Cost Per Dental Patient $400 50,000 $350 $358 $372 $333 $344 $300 40,000 Patients $274 $250 $247 $248 $259 Visits $255 $200 $249 30,000 According to the most recent data $195 $150 $181 available for state and national levels 20,000 $100 $128 (calendar year 2010), Aunt Martha’s serves 15 percent of all the patients $50 10,000 receiving dental services from a BPHC $- grantee in Illinois. 2007 2006 2008 2009 2010 - Aunt Marthas CHCs in Illinois CHCs in U.S. 2004 2006 2008 2010 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Patients 1,257 2,087 3,239 6,179 13,459 15,413 20,294 25,248Visits 2,030 2,412 5,379 10,377 22,546 30,902 44,713 55,539
  • The Care Management Model at Work Health Treatment in % of Patients Plan % with Treatment Compliance % of Patients Center Active Treatment Completed Non-Compliant Carpentersville 68% 32% - Chicago Heights 62% 38% - Hazel Crest 60% 40% - Iroquois County 92% 8% - South Holland 54% 46% - Southeast Side 59% 33% 7% Vermilion Area 83% 16% 1%Women’s Health Ctr. 46% 54% -
  • Behavioral Health Care Services Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Therapy Individual Counseling Comprehensive Diagnostic Evaluation & Treatment TelepsychiatryReaching children and families in some of Illinois’ most isolated communities
  • Cost Efficient, Coordinated Mental Health Services 35,000 Cost Per Mental Health Patient $655 $653 $700 $600 $605 30,000 $569 $572 $600 $529 25,000 $500 $559 $541 $493 $462 $493 20,000 $400 15,000 $300 Patients $200 10,000 Visits $100 5,000 $- - 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2004 2006 2008 2010 Aunt Marthas CHCs in Illinois CHCs in U.S. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Patients 210 945 878 2,632 3,916 4,757 6,265 7,647Visits 625 2,793 3,515 11,731 21,819 26,120 31,474 35,704
  • Cost Efficient, Coordinated Mental Health Services 35,000 Cost Per Mental Health Patient $655 $653 $700 $600 $605 30,000 $569 $572 $600 $529 25,000 $500 $559 $541 $493 $462 $493 20,000 $400 15,000 According to the most recent data $300 available for state and national levels Patients 10,000 Visits (calendar year 2010), Aunt Martha’s $200 serves 15 percent $100all the patients of 5,000 receiving behavioral health services $- - from a BPHC grantee in Illinois. 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2004 2006 2008 2010 Aunt Marthas CHCs in Illinois CHCs in U.S. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Patients 210 945 878 2,632 3,916 4,757 6,265 7,647Visits 625 2,793 3,515 11,731 21,819 26,120 31,474 35,704
  • The Care Management Model at Work Pt. Not Hospitalized during 90.21% treatmentPt. reports symptom improvement 92.27% within 3 months Compliant with Meds 90.72% 85.30% # appts attended 96.39% Consent Signed 81.96% Medical/Physical in File 70% 75% 80% 85% 90% 95% 100%
  • The Care Management Model at Work100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Under 18 Under 21 adult
  • Cross-Integration and the Evolution of Aunt Martha’s• This notion is not new.• Our services were born out of client needs – Youth needed someone to talk to (counselors) – Drug use (substance abuse services) – Kicked out (foster homes) – Pregnant (prenatal and family planning) – Jobs (employment) – Kids (childcare)
  • Core Training for All Employees• 4 hour training• Help you better serve clients and patients by teaching you what cross-integration is, and why and how we do it• Lecture, discussion, group activities, video, software demonstrations, Q&A• 6 Modules – Understanding Cross-Integration – Knowledge of current programs, services, locations and eligibility – Using the Client Referral System – Using the Cross-Integration application – The “VIP” protocol – Accountability and Making it Real
  • Making Connections and Coordinating Care Our Cross-Integration System enables employees to search acentralized database of each clients service history at Aunt Marthas.
  • Aunt Martha’s Cross-Integration System Once a record is selected, staff can: 1. Review Client History; 2. See the Clients Location on an interactive map; or, 3. View Suggested Programs for the client.
  • Aunt Martha’s Cross-Integration System The list of Suggested Programs can be changed by adjusting a filter of selected client characteristics.
  • Aunt Martha’s Cross-Integration SystemWhen a Suggested Program is selected, the interactive map is updated toshow:1. The clients home address; and,2. The Locations where the selected program provides its services.
  • Aunt Martha’s Cross-Integration System From within the Cross-Integration System, employees can generate an electronic referral to any of Aunt Marthas programs. The status of each record created in our Referral Tracking System can be monitored by our managers to ensure that it is acted on and closed in a timely manner.
  • Aunt Martha’s Cross-Integration System From within the Cross-Integration System, employees can generate an From July 2010 through June 2011 any of Aunt Marthas electronic referral to (FY11), a total of 3,821 requests were programs. logged in the Referral Tracking System. The status of each record created in our Referral Tracking System can be monitored by our managers to ensure More than 3,100 requests have already closed in a timely that it is acted on and been logged in FY12. manner.
  • Cross-Integration, Coordinated Care & Collaboration• Services organized from the client’s perspective• Integration of child welfare, juvenile justice and education services with the Medical Home• Alignment with local networks of health care and social service providers in every community• Implementation of systems to enable communication and simplify access and the coordination of care
  • Client Experiences – Case StudyA 17 year old young man accessed services through ourstreet outreach program and was referred to our homelessshelter when we discovered he did not have a permanentresidence. At the shelter he received help withinterpersonal skills, like skills, academic enrollment and jobpreparations skills.Using our integrated network he also received services atour health center, participated in youth leadershipopportunities and discharged to job corp with his HSDiploma where he is learning carpentry skills.
  • Client Experiences – Case StudyAn 18-year old female from Haiti was brought to AuntMartha’s by the police after it was discovered that she washomeless. She participated in our life skills programs, re-enrolled in school and began working toward reunifying herfamily.When she left Aunt Martha’s, she moved into the home of afamily member and began aftercare. The family struggled.Eventually, the young woman was referred to ourGreenhouse Shelter to ensure she continued to her work inschool, job preparation and family communication.
  • Bringing the Value to Life Telling the Stories of our Patients & ClientsIf Ernie sends the five or six bullets Karen asked him for about the value added initiatives, we can use them here.
  • Incorporating SBIRT Into Aunt Martha’s Model of Care• Previous Experience with Similar Tools – Depression Screening Tool – Dental Health Questionnaire• Automated Patient Check-In – Phreesia demonstration• Our Adult Patients in South Suburban Cook County
  • Incorporating SBIRT IntoAunt Martha’s Model of Care