Are There Drinking Motives for College StudentsDiana CarringtonArgosy UniversityAdvanced General PsychologyPSY 492Dr. Mari...
Abstract<br />If there are drinking motives for college students, then understanding the drinking motives of college stude...
College Break…What images come to your mind?<br />
Is college drinking a recent  phenomena?<br />
Understandingcollege drinking motives<br />To understand college drinking, we need to understand the college students’ mot...
What are some of the drinking motives for college students?<br />Social Motivation<br />Enhancement Motivation<br />Confor...
Social Motivation<br />	“Because it helps you enjoy a party”, you can loosen up easier and feel more confident due to the ...
Enhancement Motivation<br />	“Because you like the feeling”. It gives you a false sense of security and makes you think th...
Conformity Motivation<br />	“Because your friends pressure you to drink”, you want to be part of the crowd.<br />
Coping Motivation<br />	“To forget your worries”, its easier to just drown your sorrows in beer and liquor.<br />
Perceived Social Norms<br />The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force released a report th...
Diagnostic Instruments<br />Questionnaires asked the participants to rate likelihood and/or value or specific behaviors or...
Additional Research Question<br />An important question to determine if the majority of the population of college age pers...
Surveys and Studies<br />
Results<br />The results from these studies indicate that the entire population of college age person is not engaging in e...
Conclusion<br />Understanding the motives for college student drinking.<br />Reduction and/or prevention measures in battl...
References<br />Berkowitz, A. D., & Perkins, H. W. (1986, July).  Problem drinking among college students: A review of rec...
Maddox, G. L. (1970).  The domestic drug: Drinking among collegians.  New Haven, CT: College and University Press.<br />Ma...
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  • Dowdall, G. (2009) College drinking reframing a social problem ;Straus, R. &amp; Bacon, S. D. (1953) Drinking in college ; Blane, H. T., &amp; Hewitt, L. E. (1977) Alcohol and youth: An analysis of the literature ; Wechsler, H., &amp; McFadden, M. (1979, November Drinking among college students in New England; Hughes, S. P. &amp; Dodder, R. A. (1983) Alcohol consumption patterns among college populations
  • The best way to prevent high risk drinking is first, realize that there are some drinking motivations for college students (Mohr, Armeli,Tennen, Temple, Todd, Clark, &amp; Carney, 2005). Next is to understand the college students’ motivations to drink.
  • Martens, Rocha, Martin, &amp; Serrao, (2008). Berkowitz &amp; Perkins, (1986) gave the following drinking motivations: to enhance sociability or social interaction; to escape negative emotions or to release otherwise unacceptable ones, or to simply get drunk.
  • Other researchers agree that young people find the perceived social norms of “everyone” is drinking acceptable (Jackson, Sher, &amp; Park, 2005).
  • Drinking Motives Measures (DMM) was used in Martens et (2008); Daily Drinking Questionnaire (Collins, Parks, &amp; Marlatt, 1985); Rutgers Alcohol Problems Index (RAPI) (White &amp; Labouvie, 1989); The Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST) (Selzer, 1971) reported in Berkowitz and Perkins, (1986).
  • “Of 1,400 full time 2-4 year college students surveyed in 1999, 40% reported consuming five or more drinks on a single occasion at least once in the previous 2 weeks, a greater proportion that found among same age noncollege peers (35%) (Johnston, O’Malley, &amp; Bachman, 2000) reporting in (Hingson, Heeren, Zakoes, Kopstein, &amp; Wechsler, 2001).
  • Are there drinking motives for college students

    1. 1. Are There Drinking Motives for College StudentsDiana CarringtonArgosy UniversityAdvanced General PsychologyPSY 492Dr. Marie DubéAugust 15, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Abstract<br />If there are drinking motives for college students, then understanding the drinking motives of college students is a key factor in prevention and reduction of alcohol use and abuse on college campuses. These findings suggest that drinking alcohol provides different types of psychological effects according to the different types of motives. They also reflect on the negative behavior and consequences of alcohol abuse<br /> Keywords: college drinking, drinking motives, alcohol abuse, college student and alcohol <br />
    3. 3. College Break…What images come to your mind?<br />
    4. 4. Is college drinking a recent phenomena?<br />
    5. 5. Understandingcollege drinking motives<br />To understand college drinking, we need to understand the college students’ motivations to drink.<br />Understanding these motives is a key factor in prevention and reduction of alcohol use/abuse on college campuses<br />
    6. 6. What are some of the drinking motives for college students?<br />Social Motivation<br />Enhancement Motivation<br />Conformity Motivation<br />Coping Motivation<br />
    7. 7. Social Motivation<br /> “Because it helps you enjoy a party”, you can loosen up easier and feel more confident due to the effects of drinking.<br />
    8. 8. Enhancement Motivation<br /> “Because you like the feeling”. It gives you a false sense of security and makes you think that you can do anything better than anybody.<br />
    9. 9. Conformity Motivation<br /> “Because your friends pressure you to drink”, you want to be part of the crowd.<br />
    10. 10. Coping Motivation<br /> “To forget your worries”, its easier to just drown your sorrows in beer and liquor.<br />
    11. 11. Perceived Social Norms<br />The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Task Force released a report that stated the phenomenon of perceived social norms-or the belief that “everyone” is drinking and drinking is acceptable–is one of the strongest correlates of drinking among young adults and the subject of considerable research.<br />
    12. 12. Diagnostic Instruments<br />Questionnaires asked the participants to rate likelihood and/or value or specific behaviors or feelings thought to occur with alcohol consumption.<br />
    13. 13. Additional Research Question<br />An important question to determine if the majority of the population of college age persons is abusing alcohol is:<br /> Do college students drink more than their non-student peers?<br />
    14. 14. Surveys and Studies<br />
    15. 15. Results<br />The results from these studies indicate that the entire population of college age person is not engaging in excessive alcohol use and abuse, which is good news. Before we can understand the college student drinking problem, we need to understand their motivations to drink. Understanding these motives is a key factor in prevention and reduction of alcohol use and abuse on college campuses (NIAAA., 2007)<br />
    16. 16. Conclusion<br />Understanding the motives for college student drinking.<br />Reduction and/or prevention measures in battling alcohol use and abuse in college students.<br />The results from these studies will assist psychological counselors, educators, and parents in understanding motives for college student drinking. It is imperative that we focus on this population as; the next step will be to develop strategies to help the students help themselves through reduction and/or prevention measures in battling alcohol use and abuse in college students.<br />
    17. 17. References<br />Berkowitz, A. D., & Perkins, H. W. (1986, July). Problem drinking among college students: A review of recent research. Journal of American College Health, 35, 21-28.<br />Blane, H. T., & Hewitt, L. E. (1977). Alcohol and youth: An analysis of the literature (Fact Sheet). Springfield, IL: U. S. National Technical Information Service.<br />Collins, R. L., Parks, G. A., & Marlatt, G. A. (1985). Social determinants of alcohol consumption: The effects of social interaction and model status on the self-administration of alcohol. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 53, 189-200.<br />Dowdall, G. (2009). College drinking reframing a social problem. Wesport, CT: Praeger Publishers.<br />Hingson, R. W., Heeren, T., Zakocs, R. C., Kopstein, A., & Wechsler, H. (2001, November 20). Magnitude of alcohol-related mortality and morbidity among U. S. college students ages 18-24 (Educational Standards). Boston, MA: Boston University School of Public Health.<br />Hughes, S. P., & Dodder, R. A. (1983, May). Alcohol consumption patterns among college populations. Journal of College Student Personnel, 24, 257-264.<br />Jackson, K. M., Sher, K. J., & Park, A. (2005). Drinking among college students: Consumption and consequences. Recent Development in Alcoholism, 17, 85-117.<br />Johnston, L., O’Malley, P., & Bachman, J. (2000). Monitoring the future: National survey results on drug use (Survey Results NIH Publication NO. 00-4803). Bethesda, MD: Department of Health and Human Services.<br />Kypri, K., Cronin, M., & Wright, C. S. (2005, May). Do university students drink more hazardously than their non-student peers? Addiction, 100, 713-714.<br />
    18. 18. Maddox, G. L. (1970). The domestic drug: Drinking among collegians. New Haven, CT: College and University Press.<br />Martens, M. P., Rocha, T. L., Martin, J. L., & Serrao, H. F. (2008, April). Drinking motives and college students: Further examination of a four-factor model. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55, 289-295.<br />Mohr, C. D., Armeli, S., Tennen, H., Temple, M., Todd, M., Clark, J., & Carney, M. A. (2005, December). Moving beyond the keg party: A daily process study of college student drinking motivations. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, 19, 392-403.<br />Selzer, M. L. (1971, June). The Michigan alcohol screening test: The quest for a new diagnostic instrument. American Journal of Psychiatry, 127, 1643-1648.<br />Straus, R., & Bacon, S. D. (1953). Drinking in college. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.<br />Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2000). Summary of findings from the 1999 national household survey on drug abuse (DHHS Publication No. (SMA) 00-3466). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.<br />U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Health (NIH), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA,. (2007). Anan update on college drinking (Fact Sheet NIH Publication No. 07-5010). Bethesda, MD: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.<br />Wechsler, H., & Mc Fadden, M. (1979, November). Drinking among college students in New England. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 40, 969-996.<br />White, H. R., & Labouvie, E. W. (1989). Towards the assessment of adolescent problem drinking. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 50, 30-37.<br />

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