GNSS and the future of Road/Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS)
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Presentation at ENC2011, London, November 2011 ...

Presentation at ENC2011, London, November 2011
Presenter: Andy Sage of Helios
andy.sage@askhelios.com
_______________________________________________________________________
Follow Helios via Linkedin, www.twitter.com/askhelios and www.facebook.com/askhelios

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GNSS and the future of Road/Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. GNSS and the future of Road/Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Airports Air Traffic Management Space Andrew Sage Director, Helios 1st December 2011 Telecoms Maritime Rail www.askhelios.com
  • 2. This presentation will provide an understanding of the trends in road/ITS and the use of GNSS • History - how GNSS has become ubiquitous to road transport users • Current - How are things already changing? • Future – What can we expect round the corner • Examine three case study applications • The ‘connected vehicle revolution’ • Implications for GNSS and positioning 1
  • 3. This presentation will provide an understanding of the trends in road/ITS and the use of GNSS • History - how GNSS has become ubiquitous to road transport users • Current - How are things already changing? • Future – What can we expect round the corner • Examine three case study applications • The ‘connected vehicle revolution’ • Implications for GNSS and positioning 2
  • 4. Personal Navigation Devices (PNDs) have become commonplace globally • PNDs have met the user demand for vehicle navigation • Undercut the cost of integrated vehicle devices (IVDs) 3
  • 5. Vehicle manufacturers have, to date, been bypassed by nomadic devices • Attempts in the late 90s to offer value added services have failed, with exception of N America • Emergency call, breakdown, concierge, etc • Unwillingness of consumers to pay for these services • Vehicle navigation is the only significant application today that drives GNSS uptake in consumer vehicles • A small handful of proprietary emergency services (eg PSA) • Dedicated On-Board Units (OBUs) installed in commercial vehicles for fleet management and road pricing 4
  • 6. We are entering the third generation of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Integrated Vehicle Devices (IVDs) Personal Nav Devices (PNDs) Integrated smartphones No connectivity or dynamic content Limited connectivity or dynamic content Integrated wirelessly with vehicle High installation cost Low cost Wide range of applications 1990-2000 5 2000-2010 2010-2020
  • 7. This presentation will provide an understanding of the trends in road/ITS and the use of GNSS • History - how GNSS has become ubiquitous to road transport users • Current - How are things already changing? • Future – What can we expect round the corner • Examine three case study applications • The ‘connected vehicle revolution’ • Implications for GNSS and positioning 6
  • 8. Navigation and mapping is becoming a free commodity, assumed by users • Applications and content are becoming free at the point of use – subsidised by data charges • Eg Google, Nokia • Significantly reduced data tariffs and modem costs • Fixed costs promoted by telecomms regulators • Integrated chipsets with communications, GNSS and a multitude of other RF/sensors • Demand for seamless consumer connectivity • Merger of content/service providers with device manufacturers • Nokia/TomTom takeovers of Navteq/TeleAtlas • Google moving into smartphones 7
  • 9. The growth in GNSS smartphones is threatening to sweep away everything in its path • GNSS penetration of mobile phones = 15% in 2009 • Forecast to rise to nearly 70% by 2020 globally • Open operating systems are enabling an exponential growth in third party applications • Android - 28% of Apps can access location • iStore - In 2010, 34% of all Apps access location - over 6,000 Apps were classed as LBS • Acceptance from the rest of the industry • PNDs are becoming connected to enable dynamic content (eg traffic info) in an attempt to retain market share • Vehicles have wireless connectivity to driver’s smartphone 8
  • 10. This presentation will provide an understanding of the trends in road/ITS and the use of GNSS • History - how GNSS has become ubiquitous to road transport users • Current - How are things already changing? • Future – What can we expect round the corner • Road Pricing, e-Call, Navigation • The ‘connected vehicle revolution’ • Implications for GNSS and positioning 9
  • 11. In addition to Germany, France has now committed to GNSS road pricing for commercial vehicles Category 1: existing or planned GNSS Category 2: technology evaluation Category 3: no known plans Category 4: future non-GNSS solution (Not evaluated) 10
  • 12. GNSS is becoming the technology of choice for free-flow road user charging • Free flow schemes governing all roads • GNSS is the only solution • GNSS schemes for only motorways and trunk roads x Higher cost of on-board units and communications Lower infrastructure maintenance costs Ability to offer other value added services • New GNSS services have the potential to improve accuracy/availability/integrity • Multi-constellations will significantly improve urban accuracy/availability • Services such as EGNOS can help to counter fraud 11
  • 13. E-Call – a European regulatory initiative that is now a case of ‘when’ and not ‘if’ • EC has issued its recommendation that will lead to specifications for the upgrade of emergency call response centres • Regulation requires e-Call devices to be fitted to all new models of passenger cars and light vehicles from 2015 • The national members of CEN, the European standardisation body, have approved the standard covering Pan-European eCall Operating Requirements • Russian government is continuing with its more aggressive schedule of implementation from 2013 for its equivalent ERA programme 12
  • 14. Wide support for the implementation of e-Call amongst governments and industry • Member States seem to ‘buy into’ safety benefits • Vehicle manufacturers have been given the freedom to implement the regulation in harmony with their own plans to deliver other value added services 13
  • 15. Navigation – strong competition today between three different methods of delivery IN-VEHICLE DEVICE Greater reliability Large display screen Integration with other systems Navigation PND SMARTPHONE Low cost Portability Multi functionality Extended mapping content 14 Free turn by turn navigation Connectivity
  • 16. This presentation will provide an understanding of the trends in road/ITS and the use of GNSS • History - how GNSS has become ubiquitous to road transport users • Current - How are things already changing? • Future – What can we expect round the corner • Examine three case study applications • The ‘connected vehicle revolution’ • Implications for GNSS and positioning 15
  • 17. Vehicle manufacturers now seem convinced by the value of offering us new connected services • A distributed network • Vehicle - vehicle, vehicle – roadside • A wide selection of applications • • • • • Road side assistance Vehicle maintenance management Broadband and infotainment Navigation, mapping and content Traffic management • The timescales for uptake remain unclear in the current economic environment • The solutions will vary from fully integrated systems to those interfacing with nomadic smartphones 16
  • 18. There is evidence today of this emerging market from suppliers of GNSS and telematics • If this capability is built ‘as standard’ in most vehicles then the business case for applications such as road pricing and e-Call are substantially enhanced • Such a wide set of future applications demands stringent positioning requirements • Multiple constellations and (potentially) frequencies? • Additional assurance and integrity from EGNOS? • Complementary on-board vehicle sensors • Pressure on through-life costs is placing early pressure to future proof this on-board capability • Software receivers will enable rapid firmware upgrade to multiple GNSS as constellations become operational 17
  • 19. The sixteen year lifetime of a consumer car Design (3 years) 2012 Manufacture (3 years) 2015 2018 In-use (10 years) 2028 • Will it seem acceptable in 2028 to have a vehicle with a ‘GPS only’ receiver? 18
  • 20. Summary of key messages to take away • ITS is one of the largest navigation markets and it will continue to be a source of huge technology innovation • The widespread availability of GNSS smartphones is already influencing the market and threatens to alter our pre-conceptions of navigation and pricing • We are about to enter a new generation in ITS services driven by the emergence of connected vehicles • The long-life time of vehicles demands a long term perspective and preparation for new GNSS services and other sensors that will enhance performance 19
  • 21. Airports Air Traffic Management Thank you for your attention Andrew Sage andrew.sage@askhelios.com Space Telecoms Maritime Rail www.askhelios.com