You'll Always Remember Your First
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

You'll Always Remember Your First

on

  • 370 views

Working as a contractor is a big and sometimes nerve racking step for most professionals. Often times because they are leaving their comfort zone for an opportunity to work as a contractor they want ...

Working as a contractor is a big and sometimes nerve racking step for most professionals. Often times because they are leaving their comfort zone for an opportunity to work as a contractor they want to make sure to secure the very best contract.

In this Slideshare, Managing Partner, David Kushan, takes us thought the mindset of finding your first contract.

He also covers the reality of your contracts to follow. At certain points in your career, you may find yourself accepting engagements that are less than ideal.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
370
Views on SlideShare
314
Embed Views
56

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 56

http://healthcareis.com 39
http://m.healthcareis.com 15
http://www.healthcareis.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

You'll Always Remember Your First You'll Always Remember Your First Presentation Transcript

  • Getting Into Healthcare IT Contracting Contract Here
  • If you’re looking to get into consulting as a contractor . . .
  • If you’re looking to get into consulting as a contractor . . . (someone who gets paid an hourly rate while on projects but is not paid in between)
  • If you’re looking to get into consulting as a contractor . . . (someone who gets paid an hourly rate while on projects but is not paid in between) . . . then you have to understand the difference between getting your first contract and getting every other contract after that.
  • When you’re looking for your first contract, you can have a “perfect” standard for what you’re looking for and you really don’t have to budge (assuming you understand market conditions).
  • However, once you’re in contracting, although you want to maintain a high standard, there may be times when you’ll need an understanding of what’s not necessarily “perfect” but certainly “acceptable.” Allow me to discuss the difference . . .
  • Your First Contract If you’re not currently contracting, then you’re probably in a salaried position with either a provider organization or another consulting firm. (In both of these scenarios, you have a regular paycheck coming in.) As you begin to evaluate consulting contract opportunities, you’re doing so as an employee of a company while you’re receiving a paycheck.
  • The luxury you have at this time is that if you don’t like any of the aspects or conditions of a contract being presented to you, you simply don’t have to take the contract. As a salaried employee you have this luxury because, if you turn the contract down, you still have a job and a regular paycheck. It’s during this time that you can afford to be as selective as you’re ever going to be when choosing a contract.
  • So . . .
  • So . . . if the compensation is a little less than ideal . . .
  • So . . . if the compensation is a little less than ideal . . . if the work is not to your liking . . .
  • So . . . if the compensation is a little less than ideal . . . if the work is not to your liking . . . if the required travel is extremely inconvenient . . .
  • So . . . if the compensation is a little less than ideal . . . if the work is not to your liking . . . if the required travel is extremely inconvenient . . . You can just turn the contract down and wait for the next one.
  • Your Second Contract Let’s look down the road.
  • You’re now working as a contractor on your first project. You’ve had a really good experience. You have 30 days left on your contract and the client has just informed you that they’re not going to be extending the contract. This is not a bad thing; it’s just how the contract business works. All contracts come to an end at some point.
  • Now you begin to put your feelers out to multiple firms, just as you did when you were looking to get into contracting to begin with. Soon, potential contracts begin to come your way. Here’s the difference: Thirty days from now your contract will be over and you won’t have a paycheck coming in. Although everyone’s financial situation will be a little different, you will quickly be coming to the point where you will have to accept some contract.
  • Prior to getting into contracting, you were able to say to yourself, “I either get close to a perfect situation or I won’t leave my job.”
  • Prior to getting into contracting, you were able to say to yourself, “I either get close to a perfect situation or I won’t leave my job.” Now you’re in a situation where, if you wait for a close-to-perfect situation and don’t find one, you’ll not be getting paid while you wait!
  • This is a big difference, and many contractors are not mentally prepared for it. What I mean by this is that they pass up on some contracts that offer good situations, but may not be perfect, and end up being on the “bench” with no paycheck for a few weeks longer than they should’ve — only to eventually accept a similar “good” contract a month later. The only difference is that the contractor gave up a month’s pay (this example assumes the contractor wants to work and not be on vacation).
  • Having a realistic view as to what’s “acceptable” (not bad) but not necessarily “perfect” will lead to less bench time and more billable hours. This, of course, leads to more income, year to year, and can certainly affect how long you’ll remain a contractor.
  • Learn More At HealthcareIS.com •  Ways to negotiate •  How to get the right contract •  Who to work with •  Tips for traveling consultants Receive weekly tips from Healthcare IS on ways to improve your contracting career.