0
What makes us


   online?
“She was pretty cool”
:)   :)


      Pace
     Pitch
    Pause
   Volume
  Gestures
Intonation
People like me
Survival of the
least fit
First impressions
  Someone :
First impressions
  Someone :

  1.   I know (Familiarity)
First impressions
  Someone :

  1.   I know (Familiarity)
  2.   Like me (Similarity)
First impressions
  Someone :

  1.   I know (Familiarity)
  2.   Like me (Similarity)
  3.   Respected (Authority)
Trust in advertising


 Recommendations from people known                                90%
                             ...
Would you recommend
us to a friend?
Trusty tips
& examples
1. People I know
Live in the
comments
Live in the
comments
To err is human
To err is human
To err is human
2. People like me
Know
                                  thy
                                 user




Source: Robert Barlow-Busch’s
chopsti...
We trust
‘people like me’
Fri., 2008/04/09

"PDF Is Great"
My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on Easter Sunday
morning, so I needed t...
1. Specific


        Fri., 2008/04/09

        "PDF Is Great"
        My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on...
1. Specific
2. Overcome objections

        Fri., 2008/04/09

        "PDF Is Great"
        My son is going to play a trum...
1. Specific
2. Overcome objections
3. Context
        Fri., 2008/04/09

        "PDF Is Great"
        My son is going to p...
Match existing knowledge
Argue against self-interest
Argue against self-interest
Reciprocity
Identity
Empathy
3. Respected people
Authorities
Celebrities
Logos
Logos
Remember
Someone :
 1.   I know (Familiarity)
 2.   Like me (Similarity)
 3.   Respected (Authority)
Ash Donaldson
      ash@produxi.com
        @ashdonaldson




      designing better user experiences
What makes us trust online?
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What makes us trust online?

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In person, we use body language, voice, tone, pitch and intonation to judge weather we trust others. But how do we create trust online? We’ll explore why we trust and how best to convey it on the web.

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  • Have you ever met someone and immediately felt at ease with them?
  • You may have noticed that they have a similar way of communicating to you
  • Or that you share similar styles, views, backgrounds, or goals
    Why is this? Why do we like people who seem similar or familiar? Why do we trust them?
  • Humans have big brains & therefore very big heads, so we have to be popped out too young to defend ourselves. Since we’re born vulnerable, we’ve had to evolve to be social creatures, trusting in others
  • We need to be able to discern who we can trust, from those we can’t
    Like all animals, humans can be violent or protective
  • So we evolved a number of innate heuristics to assess our ‘first impression’ of trust.
    These basic principles are reflected in every type of interaction - even online
  • So we evolved a number of innate heuristics to assess our ‘first impression’ of trust.
    These basic principles are reflected in every type of interaction - even online
  • So we evolved a number of innate heuristics to assess our ‘first impression’ of trust.
    These basic principles are reflected in every type of interaction - even online
  • In April, Neilsen’s research yet again showed that the most effective form of advertising was through recommendations from people we were familiar with - friends.
    The second most effective was from people we are similar to - other customers.
  • Reichheld’s ‘Ultimate Question’ survey is an accurate predictor of success.
  • Here are some tips for putting this understanding of trust into action online
    The obvious: Credible org; Domain name; Design quality; Current content; Extensive content; Archives; Links; Physical address; Policies that show trust.
    Looking at a few examples of the three heuristics...
  • Of course, this is why social media is so popular and important on 2 levels:
    1. Creating direct relationships with your users, so they ‘know’ you
    2. Letting them then champion your brand, recommending you to THEIR friends
  • Only moderate for flaming and language. Some negative comments and appropriate responses can do great things for your credibility - Wells Fargo
  • Everyone makes mistakes. Admit to them and, more importantly, do something about it, and you’ll raise both credibility and trust. Play your cards right, and you’ll also be able to create some brand evangelists out of your biggest detractors.
  • Everyone makes mistakes. Admit to them and, more importantly, do something about it, and you’ll raise both credibility and trust. Play your cards right, and you’ll also be able to create some brand evangelists out of your biggest detractors.
  • Understanding your audience and being able to create a personality for your site or service that people will recognise
  • User research is essential. To garner trust online, we need to know our users well
  • Give as much relevant info as possible with customer reviews
    Trip Advisor employs reviews with photos, names, behaviours, and demographics so people can identify with them
  • When assessing a new source, users look for info that confirms what they already know. An initial match will make them more likely to trust.
  • Pointing out both the advantages AND disadvantages shows that you have the user’s best interests at heart
  • Contrast principle shows that people are more likely to choose the second or third most expensive option, so recommend it!
  • You’ve got to show respect and trust of your users for them to trust you in return
    Netflix lets you keep your DVDs as long as you want. No late fees!
  • Use pictures of people that dress and look like your audience - people they can identify with
  • Or if what you’re targeting is more abstract, use images people can empathise with
  • If you want people to trust in authority, make sure the images of people look the part. Also, make sure to give them a name and a reference, so people can see they’re real people.
  • Celebrities are only useful for promoting what they’re known for. Although Tiger Woods is great for promoting golf, he’s proven to be not so useful for promoting watches or razors. People tend not to trust the use of celebrities for something unrelated to what they’re known for.
  • Employ trusted, well-known brands where possible, and avoid the award/certificate overkill.
  • So remember these simple heuristics we use to assess our ‘first impression’ of trust.
  • Transcript of "What makes us trust online?"

    1. 1. What makes us online?
    2. 2. “She was pretty cool”
    3. 3. :) :) Pace Pitch Pause Volume Gestures Intonation
    4. 4. People like me
    5. 5. Survival of the least fit
    6. 6. First impressions Someone :
    7. 7. First impressions Someone : 1. I know (Familiarity)
    8. 8. First impressions Someone : 1. I know (Familiarity) 2. Like me (Similarity)
    9. 9. First impressions Someone : 1. I know (Familiarity) 2. Like me (Similarity) 3. Respected (Authority)
    10. 10. Trust in advertising Recommendations from people known 90% 90% Consumer opinions posted 70% Newspaper 61% Online banner ads 33% Source: The Nielsen Company, April 2009
    11. 11. Would you recommend us to a friend?
    12. 12. Trusty tips & examples
    13. 13. 1. People I know
    14. 14. Live in the comments
    15. 15. Live in the comments
    16. 16. To err is human
    17. 17. To err is human
    18. 18. To err is human
    19. 19. 2. People like me
    20. 20. Know thy user Source: Robert Barlow-Busch’s chopsticker.com, 2007
    21. 21. We trust ‘people like me’
    22. 22. Fri., 2008/04/09 "PDF Is Great" My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on Easter Sunday morning, so I needed to e-mail the music to him so he could practice it at college. Scanning it into MS Word gave me a poor, blocky image. I couldn't tell sharps from flats! Using OpenOffice, I was able not only to scan in a great image of the music, but also tune the resulting PDF to be rendered beautifully on my son's inkjet printer. I was impressed and appreciative. Keep up the good work. D. Dahlke, Washington DC
    23. 23. 1. Specific Fri., 2008/04/09 "PDF Is Great" My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on Easter Sunday morning, so I needed to e-mail the music to him so he could practice it at college. Scanning it into MS Word gave me a poor, blocky image. I couldn't tell sharps from flats! Using OpenOffice, I was able not only to scan in a great image of the music, but also tune the resulting PDF to be rendered beautifully on my son's inkjet printer. I was impressed and appreciative. Keep up the good work. D. Dahlke, Washington DC
    24. 24. 1. Specific 2. Overcome objections Fri., 2008/04/09 "PDF Is Great" My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on Easter Sunday morning, so I needed to e-mail the music to him so he could practice it at college. Scanning it into MS Word gave me a poor, blocky image. I couldn't tell sharps from flats! Using OpenOffice, I was able not only to scan in a great image of the music, but also tune the resulting PDF to be rendered beautifully on my son's inkjet printer. I was impressed and appreciative. Keep up the good work. D. Dahlke, Washington DC
    25. 25. 1. Specific 2. Overcome objections 3. Context Fri., 2008/04/09 "PDF Is Great" My son is going to play a trumpet piece in church on Easter Sunday morning, so I needed to e-mail the music to him so he could practice it at college. Scanning it into MS Word gave me a poor, blocky image. I couldn't tell sharps from flats! Using OpenOffice, I was able not only to scan in a great image of the music, but also tune the resulting PDF to be rendered beautifully on my son's inkjet printer. I was impressed and appreciative. Keep up the good work. D. Dahlke, Washington DC
    26. 26. Match existing knowledge
    27. 27. Argue against self-interest
    28. 28. Argue against self-interest
    29. 29. Reciprocity
    30. 30. Identity
    31. 31. Empathy
    32. 32. 3. Respected people
    33. 33. Authorities
    34. 34. Celebrities
    35. 35. Logos
    36. 36. Logos
    37. 37. Remember Someone : 1. I know (Familiarity) 2. Like me (Similarity) 3. Respected (Authority)
    38. 38. Ash Donaldson ash@produxi.com @ashdonaldson designing better user experiences
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