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Change is Good You go First

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Sky diving. Bungee jumping. Implementing change. They are all good ideas, but who wants to go first? When it comes to most employees, the usual answer is: “Not me!” How then, can your organization …

Sky diving. Bungee jumping. Implementing change. They are all good ideas, but who wants to go first? When it comes to most employees, the usual answer is: “Not me!” How then, can your organization get better, compete and grow?

In today’s highly competitive and uncertain environment, implementing strategic change is vital. Yet, seven out of ten initiatives fail to deliver the desired results. You and your team must overcome resistance to change, develop effective habits and focus on what’s right, not who’s right.

In this webinar, author and consultant, Juan Riboldi reveals the five keys for overcoming resistance to change. Learn how effective leaders gain wide-spread commitment for making strategic initiatives produce significant returns in 100 days and over time.

By the end of this webinar you will know how to:

• Create a powerful coalition of allies
• Build common purpose around a shared vision
• Focus the organization on the most vital priorities
• Develop a critical number of change champions
• Maximize the value of your resources

Join us for an informative and engaging presentation from the expert in mastering change—Juan Riboldi. Bring up your questions and receive sound advice to lead change in your organization.

To learn more about Ascent Advisor visit us at: www.ascent-advisor.com

Published in Business , Technology
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  • Change Is Good . . You Go First!BEFORE the Webinar Setup the Webinar Open the slides Load the questions Review the FlowAT the Start of Webinar Go Live Record the Webinar Start on time Get OK from Observer!INTRODUCTION Introduce yourself and the webinar Provide a brief introduction about the participants Introduce Juan Riboldi – Bio references Allow for 3 minutes to tell us something personal about himself
  • INTRO to ASCENT ADVISORBefore we jump into this presentation, tell us: What do you do at Ascent Advisor?Ascent Advisor is a management consulting firm.We work with progressive leaders at the fastest growing companies seeking for performance breakthroughsWe take organizations on The Path of Ascentto achieve significant and sustainable results while guaranteeing 4xROIWe build the organization’s capacity for mastering change in 100 days
  • CONTENT OUTLINEThe title of this webinar has caught many people’s attention. What are we going to learn from it?The purpose of this webinar is to learn how we can facilitate the successful change at work.We are going to tell the story of how one company went about facilitating a complex change Through this course, we will talk about change, recognize the natural responses to change, and learn effective strategies for responding to situations.Our goal is to become champions for change, developing in others a greater capacity to learn, adapt and implement positive changes in our organization.What additional objectives will make this webinar most valuable to our participants? Post your questions and specific objectives. We will do our best to answer them in the course of the presentation.
  • CHANGE IS GOOD . . .We are here to learn about “Change.”We live in a world of constant change.Change is affecting all of us in many ways.In recent times the pace of change seems to be accelerating.What are some of the changes you are experiencing at work right now? Have participants share a few examples of changes at your organization Responses may include technology, competition, economy, regulation, growth, or diverse workforce Draw a circle representing your group Draw arrows pointing towards the circle, representing each type of change affecting their groupThere are many forces impacting you and your organization. Are these changes for better or worse? It depends! Not all change is necessarily for the better. Change brings opportunities as well as threatsWhat determines whether any of these changes is for better or worse? Us! It’s our choice! Build the slideDraw a person inside the circle with arrows pointing right and left. Emphasize that it is our choices that make change an opportunity or a threat. Offer one example of how we decide to turn change into an opportunity or a threat. Ask participants for examples from their personal livesBuild up to the key point: Change Is Inevitable. Growth Is Optional.
  • Change Is Inevitable. Growth Is Optional State the key point: Change Is Inevitable. Growth Is Optional. Comment on how change is both an opportunity and a risk depending on how we approach itThe decision to adopt a new way of doing things is to help us do our jobs better, more effectively.Adopting change is also different and requires a learning curve to master.How canour response to change affect the ultimate outcome?
  • Seven out of ten change initiatives fail to deliver the desired results.We ask ourselves: WHY? What makes the difference between the few that succeed and the many that struggle, or ultimately fail?
  • READING PEOPLEWhen faced with a change like adoptingnew technology, people respond in different ways.What people say may represent just the tip of the iceberg.What they really mean is at the root of their reaction.We want to get better at reading people.Let’s review a few examples. Build one example at a time Ask someone to read “what people say” Discuss as a group what this person may really mean Go through all three cases quickly Allow for the group to start personalizing responses to their change Keep it fun and engagingConclude by saying:We need to get better at looking beyond the surface to understand what lies underneath. Build a transition to the iceberg slide
  • LOOKING FOR ROOT CAUSESWe must learn to look for the root causes behind people’s actions and comments.What people say and do is just the tip of the iceberg.What lies underneath reveals the root causesBy understanding the root causes we can effectively address the real concernsHere are examples of the five common roots causes hindering successBehind each of the comments above, we can trace specific types of concerns.
  • THE ROOT CAUSESResearch shows that all change challenges point to five root causes.People are going to respond in different ways to change.Yet their responses always point to predictable types of root causes.We call these five root causes widening gaps, because they are growing concerns in our society.In order to change effectively, we must address the root causesKnowing what to look for makes all the difference!Poll Question:Which of these root causes is affecting your organization?Low TrustLack of FocusPoor CapabilityWeak CommitmentDelayed Results
  • KEY POINTPeople are going to respond in different ways to change.In order to change effectively, we must address the root causes
  • RESISTANCEWhat do we see here?This symbolizes how people often approach change, as a tug of war.We tend to view resistance as a negative force, impeding change.We must learn to recognize resistance as a natural reaction.There’s no such thing as resistance to CHANGE.There’s onlyresistance to PAIN.Build slideResistance to change is natural,necessary and desirable.No one can force even a good thing on anybody else.When making a change, first consider what the other person wants.We will pay close attention to what people really mean and want by mapping their responses on a graph, the Sponsor Profile.
  • Poll Question:To what extent is your organization on the Roller Coaster Ride, or on the Path of Ascent?Definitively riding the Roller CoasterAt times it feels like the roller coaster It depends on the change initiativeMostly going forward steadilyClearly on the Path of Ascent
  • Poll Question:How well is your organization applying the Ascent Principles and practices to facilitate the change process?Very Poorly – Skipped most principles and practicesPoorly – Tend to overlook several principles and practicesInconsistently – Good in some areas poorly in othersVery Well – Tend to apply all principles and practicesExcellent – Consistently follows a proven change process
  • SPONSOR PROFILEThe Sponsor Profile helps us map the roles we play based on our level of influence and commitment for change.Each of the quadrants represent a type of response to a given situation.These quadrants are not necessarily people.Each of us may be avid allies on one change and bold blockers on another, depending on our role in the situation. Describe the model Briefly introduce each of the profiles
  • ALLIES Present the Role of Allies Facilitate How to Engage Allies Make sure participants understand the role Move quickly as possible through all four roles Spend about 2-3 minutes per roleHow to Engage AlliesMake reference to the sponsor of the change—this person is your strongest AllyTo ensure success, build a network of Allies inside your teamYou need at least one Ally in your teamHave the Allies communicate with other groups (not necessarily their own)Work with Allies to bring everyone along!
  • FOLLOWERS Present the Role of Followers Facilitate How to Engage Followers Make sure participants understand the role Move quickly as possible through all four roles Spend about 2-3 minutes per roleHow to Engage Followers?Develop a critical amount of Followers in your teamKeep the Followers informed and engaged in the change processBroaden the role of Followers to work with those who are less engaged (Fence Sitters)Make the Followers views known to everyone elseGive Followers meaningful and doable responsibilities
  • CHALLENGERS Present the Role of Challengers Facilitate How to Engage Challengers Make sure participants understand the role Move quickly as possible through all four roles Spend about 2-3 minutes per roleHow to Engage Challengers?Actively listen to the Challenger’s views and concernsAcknowledge the value of their feedback and demonstrate real understandingClarify Challenger’s misconceptions and missing informationRecognize the Challengers’ concerns in public and provide a plan to address those issuesInvite a few, selected Challengers to participate in the change processShow those that join the process, that you take them seriously
  • BLOCKERS Present the Role of Blockers Facilitate How to Engage Blockers Make sure participants understand the role Move quickly as possible through all four roles Spend about 2-3 minutes per roleHow to Engage Blockers?Recognize and identify overt or potential BlockersRecognize the influence of their positionUnderstand the motives and desires of BlockersAnticipate likely actions from BlockersIf necessary, negotiate for degrees of support with a BlockerFor a change to succeed, you need a significant balance of support over BlockersIMPORTANT: Use the model to understand the roles Appropriate: “This person may act as a blocker because …” Avoid using the model to label people Inappropriate: “Let’s get rid of all the Blockers!”
  • Poll Question:What are the primary responses to change do you anticipate in your organization?Active participation from AlliesStrong support from FollowersSignificant resistance from ChallengersStrong opposition from BlockersAbout an even distribution across the board
  • PREPARE TO RESPONDBased on the responses you anticipate, how can best engage members in your group?
  • GOING UP?Making the best of change comes down to a choice.As a leader, how can you facilitate the choice to benefit from change? Ask participants for ideas and build on their ideasAs leaders, our example is very influential.How we respond to the change process will send a powerful message.We must start by engaging ourselves.We become fully engaged when we commit to a cause greater than ourselves.In the change implementation process, we can become champions for change.In adopting change, we can see, and help others see, an opportunity for doing things better.
  • BAREFOOT DOCTORSFormal or informal leaders can act as change champions.To illustrate the vital importance of having the change champions work along side the rest of the workers, let’s review China’s use of “barefoot doctors.”During Mao Zedong’s rule, the Chinese health ministry had repeatedly failed to provide even the basic health care to the country’s massive population.They sent experts to teach the villagers how to prevent the delay diseased, but the people did not change their well entrenched habits.They conducted massive campaigns promoting basic hygiene, but the people did not adopt the advice.At one point, they even sent their military troops to force people into preventive healthcare, and the people resisted even more. Disease in the rural regions was widespread and uncontrollable.Finally, the answer to this growing problem came in the form of empowered villagers.Respected peasants, both men and women from every village were selected for a short but intensive medical training in Beijing.After being taught basic health principles, they were sent back to their villages to treat common illnesses.They were to become Barefoot Doctors–the primary healthcare providers for their villages.Barefoot doctors continued their farming work in the rice paddies, while being readily available to help those in need.In short time these change champions effectively stopped the spread of infectious diseases throughout rural China.What can we learn from this story?A group of respected insiders empowered with knowledge and skills influences the entire organization
  • MANAGERS VS. CHAMPIONSAs Change Champions, we are not necessarily acting in our roles as managers.Here are some important differences between managers and change champions. Ask a participant to summarize the differencesHow can we become change champions at your organization? Facilitate a brief group discussion
  • ROLES OF CHANGE CHAMPIONSAs champions for change we can play various influential roles.Have participants read aloud each roleWhat roles are you currently playing in the organization?What roles could you be playing to become a more effective champion for change? Ask participants to identify key roles they are playing as change champions Place a check mark by each of the roles you are currently playing Describe specific development actions below the roles you could be playing more effectively You may not need to set goals for each role, only those you could be doing more effectively Share your insights with a peer Discuss insights as a group
  • CLOSINGBring the class to a close by stating the importance of our example.Consider your daily actions:What example do you set?What cues others take from you?What do you need to change?By changing ourselves, we change how others respond to us.“Be the change you want to see happen.” Gandhi

Transcript

  • 1. W E B - S E M I N A R
    Change Is Good
    . . . You Go First!
    The Five Keys for Overcoming Resistance to Change
    Based on recently published research by Juan Riboldi
    The Path of Ascent:
    The Five Principles for Mastering Change
  • 2. What We Do
    • We work with progressive leaders
    at the fastest growing companies
    seeking for performance breakthroughs
    • We take organizations on The Path of Ascent
    to achieve significant and sustainable results
    • We build the organization’s capacity
    for mastering change in 100 days
  • 3. Contents
    Mastering Change at Work
    Change Is Good . . . You Go First!
    Understanding Resistance
    Facilitating the Change Process
    Responding to Change
    Developing Change Champions
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    3
  • 4. Change Is Good . . .
    Whether a change is
    for better or worse
    is your choice.
    You Go First!
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    4
  • 5. Change is Inevitable
    Growth is Optional
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    5
  • 6. Making Change Work
    Seven out of ten
    change initiatives fail to
    deliver the desired results.
    WHY?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  • 7. Reading People
    What People Say:
    “I understand the system,
    but it seems not everyone does.”
    “We are only as good as our last customer experience.”
    “I don’t want to take hours away from my co-workers.”
    What Do Really They Mean?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    7
  • 8. Looking for Root Causes
    TIP OF THE ICEBERG:
    “Why this now?”
    “It’s not clear to us yet”
    “We’ll need more training”
    “It’s not what I expected”
    “It’s taking too long!”
    WHAT LIES UNDERNEATH:
    Low Trust
    Lack of Focus
    Poor Capability
    Weak Commitment
    Delayed Results
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    8
  • 9. The Root Causes
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    9
  • 10. All change challenges
    point to five root causes.
    You can change effectively by
    addressing the root causes.
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    10
  • 11. There’s no such thing as
    resistance to CHANGE.
    There’s only
    resistance to PAIN.
    When making a change,
    first consider what the other person wants.
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    11
  • 12. Research Background
    • 50 publicly traded organizations
    • 13. Drastic change in the last 15 years
    • 14. Ranked by level of success
    • 15. Goals Met and Sustained
    • 16. Compared the top and bottom 10
    • 17. Found the difference between
    the Change Masters and Failures
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    12
  • 18. Research Findings
    400% Average Difference!
    1,000% Maximum Difference!
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    13
  • 19. Key Point:
    Effective change
    produces huge returns.
    4 X ROI
    The Path of Ascent - © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    5/26/2011
    14
  • 20. Recognizing the Course
    Change Masters
    Change Failures
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    15
  • 21. Recognizing the Course
    Change Masters
    Change Failures
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    16
  • 22. Recognizing the Course
    Change Masters
    Change Failures
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    17
  • 23. Key Point:
    Effective change
    follows a different path
    from the beginning.
    The Path of Ascent - © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    5/26/2011
    18
  • 24. Our Approach
    The Ascent Process
    The 5Es for Mastering Change
    The Ascent Process is grounded on over 20 years of
    practical experience and reliable research
    in the field of organizational change.
  • 25. Applying the Ascent Process
    20
    Envision:
    Create the story of
    success
    Low
    Trust?
    Build Common
    Purpose
    1
    Evaluate:
    Seize the opportunity
    for change
    Lack
    Focus?
    Clarify
    Direction
    2
    Empower:
    Develop capacity from
    strengths
    Poor
    Capability?
    Develop
    Capacity
    3
    Engage:
    Inspire teamwork
    and commitment
    Weak
    Commitment?
    Inspire
    Commitment
    4
    Evolve:
    Achieve increasingly
    better results
    Delayed
    Results?
    Achieve
    Results
    5
  • 26. Sponsor Profile
    Roles we play based on level of Influence and Commitment for change
    Allies
    Fence
    Sitters
    Blockers
    Followers
    Challengers
    INFLUENCE
    COMMITMENT
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    21
  • 27. Allies
    The Role of Allies:
    Allies
    • An Ally is an active supporter of the change
    • 28. Allies have positive attitudes towards the change
    • 29. Allies are willing to play a role during the implementation process
    • 30. A strong Ally is a formal or informal leader in the group
    How to Engage Allies?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    22
  • 31. Followers
    The Role of Followers:
    • A Follower is a friendly supporter of the change
    • 32. Followers are generally open to change
    • 33. Followers are willing to lend their votes in support of the process
    • 34. As a group, Followers can be very influential
    Followers
    How to Engage Followers?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    23
  • 35. Challengers
    The Role of Challengers:
    • A Challenger is either not committed, or decidedly opposed to the change
    • 36. Challengers have reasons to believe the change is not good, or likely to fail
    • 37. When Challengers gain a new perspective, they become the strongest advocates
    • 38. Challengers, as an organized group can present significant resistance
    Challengers
    How to Engage Challengers?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    24
  • 39. Blockers
    The Role of Blockers:
    • A Blocker is decidedly opposed to the change
    • 40. Blockers are convinced that the change is not good, or likely to fail
    • 41. Blockers will use their influence to prevent the change from happening
    • 42. The most powerful Blockers, will mask their true identity, to further their cause
    Blockers
    How to Engage Blockers?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    25
  • 43. Your Team’s Profile
    Mark the level of influence and commitment you anticipate from each person in your team.
    Allies
    Fence
    Sitters
    Blockers
    Followers
    Challengers
    INFLUENCE
    COMMITMENT
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    26
  • 44. Prepare to Respond
    Based on the responses you anticipate, how can best engage members in your group?
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    27
  • 45. Going Up?
    We become fully engaged when we commit to a cause greater than ourselves.
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    28
  • 46. Barefoot Doctors
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    29
  • 47. Manager vs. Change Champion
    Manager
    Change Champion
    • Formal authority
    • 48. Responsible for achieving results
    • 49. Manages the team performance
    • 50. Influence
    • 51. Responsible for helping others achieve results
    • 52. Facilitates the team’s performance improvement
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    30
  • 53. Roles of Change Champions
    Change Agent
    • Introduces new ideas, better ways of doing things, and focus
    Results Catalyst
    • Gets results by applying principles rather than policy or authority
    Living Example
    • Serves as role model, demonstrating desired behaviors, walks the talk
    Facilitator
    • Brings together tools, information and resources to achieve group goals
    Barrier Buster
    • Breaks down artificial barriers, opens doors, challenges status quo
    Business Analyzer
    • Sees the big picture, identifies opportunities, advocates for the customer
    Coach
    • Teaches others, helps others develop their full potential, ensures accountability
    Leader
    • Leads through influence, energy and enthusiasm
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    31
  • 54. Consider your daily actions:
    What example do you set?
    What cues others take from you?
    What do you need to change?
    By changing ourselves,
    we change how others respond to us.
    Be the change
    you want to see happen.
    ~Gandhi
    © Ascent Advisor, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    32
  • 55. W E B - S E M I N A R
    Change Is Good
    . . . You Go First!
    The Five Keys for Overcoming Resistance to Change
    Based on recently published research by Juan Riboldi
    The Path of Ascent:
    The Five Principles for Mastering Change