The Arts Ripple Effect             “It is in the best interest of          every business – no matter its                 ...
The Arts Ripple Effect• Benefits to our Region   –Economic Driver   –Building Community“A creative economy is the fuel of ...
Facts about the Arts and Economic    Development in the Kansas City Region• Tourism in Greater Kansas City  generated $641...
Facts about the Arts and Economic    Development in the Kansas City Region• Kansas City hosted 21.6 million  visitors in 2...
Community Building• Arts create a place where  people want to be• The arts magnetize  communities by creating  shared expe...
Governors Summit
The Growing Creative Industries         • Creative class studies have           focused on the arts as an           enviro...
21st Century Work Skills• Innovation & Design will drive the economy  of the future• The four C’s of the 21st Century  – C...
21st Century Work Skills• Artists engage in creativity,  collaboration, communication,  and critical thinking on many  lev...
Private Public Partnerships• The vision of Business  and Civic Leadership  – Growing Recognition    that arts/culture and ...
Creative Place Making    • Business, civic, and nonprofit      sectors of the community come      together      – Plan and...
Creative Place Making     • Mid America Regional       Council Planning       – Cultural Corridors         • Avenue of the...
The Crossroads Arts District• Large Institutions created Capacity   – UMKC Conservatory of Music & Dance   – Kansas City A...
One Success led to the Next• 900M in Capital Investment   – The Bloch Building – Nelson Atkins   – AMC – Main street   – R...
Next Steps• Collaborative branding Kansas  City as a destination for Arts &  Culture  – Convention and Visitors    Associa...
Next Steps• The Need for Public Support  – Needed for the long-term    growth and sustainability    of the Arts    • Conti...
The Arts Ripple Effect
The Arts Ripple Effect
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The Arts Ripple Effect

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  • At the arts Council we have three priorities:Connector – Catalyst – ConvenerSupport for the Arts – ArtsKC FundConnector for the general public and business to the arts communityTransition to Overview
  • One of our community leaders said it well when he recognized this idea of the arts ripple effectWhy the Arts – What has been the value proposition?To create a great citySafety – Education – Cultural amenities
  • Mention both economic driver and creating community & elaborate on both pointsSurprising effect - all benefit regardless of participationOne, economic vitality – the arts act a economic engine – more galleries, theaters, and concerts create vibrant and thriving neighborhood – they led to more energy and life in a community, renovated building, they create an appealing place- encouraging tourism. The development of the crossroads is an excellent example of this.  
  • Arts & Cultural Organizations produce $279 million in economic impact for KC metro region. - study in 2004 – new Study for 2010 – expect roughly 300 MThe direct economic benefits are source of employment, those who work in arts industries (both artists and related arts workers), tax revenues, and spending for local communities. industries that directly supply arts organizations with goods and services, and in industries that benefit from providing services (e.g., food, lodging, parking) to arts consumers. For tax revenues this includes governments who collect income, sales, and property taxes on incomes, purchases, and real property of arts and related industries and their employees and consumers and the increases in overall economic activity (spending and employment) that the arts industry adds to a local market through a multiplier effect Indirect economic benefits are those that result when the arts attract individuals and firms to locations where the arts are available. These benefits hinge on the attraction the arts offer to particular classes of workers (skilled) and firms (high value-added), an attraction that strengthens the local economy and promotes economic development (Florida, 2002).Young people are choosing where to live – then looking for a job
  • Sprint center article from April 13 – despite difficulties with attracting a sports team – more paid on the bond than expectedRanks #11 in the world for highest attendance and gross revenues - Mention NPR article regarding the possibility of a sports team coming in and the reluctance to do so because of competing dates – never thought I’d ever hear that!#2 in the country – US
  •   Two – there is a benefit in people coming together and having shared experiences – connecting shared ideas and learning from each other – sharing multiple perspectives. The arts can bridge the gaps between gender, race, and social class - in essence creating a stronger community that works together.Arts create a place where people want to beThe arts magnetize communities by creating shared experienceThe arts can also build a community through intergenerational activityThe Arts can also build or magnetize a community through intergenerational activity. Based on the theory of social capital that the arts magnetize through intergenerational activity, teenagers are often the missing link in social capital theory. Informal, amateur arts activity is one of the few places outside family and schools where adults, college students, and teenagers interact freely and willingly with one anotherChildren performances recitals – parents/grandparents/uncles/aunts etcResearchers have demonstrated that arts activities are desired by neighborhood residents, whether or not they are high-pay “creative” workers, and that neighborhoods with higher concentrations of arts activity have higher levels of neighborhood commitment and involvement. This magnetization of neighborhoods through the arts (as well as other activities) is associated with higher levels of neighborhood stability and/or improvement (Taylor, September 2008). In his work, City: Rediscovering the Center, sociologist William H. Whyte summarized the results of several years of videotaping plazas, intersections, and other public spaces in recommendations to planning and zoning commissions on the design of urban areas to maximize their public use and enjoyment (1988). One of Whyte’s principal recommendations was to encourage street performers and other kinds of amateur arts presentation because arts are fun and they create a place where people want to be. NTDF supports these types of activities
  • A region’s arts and cultural landscape is one of the key decision factors for companies looking at relocation opportunities. Kansas City Area Development CouncilNeil NewhouseSummarze presentation to this point – Arts are economic driver – Arts can build create community
  • Young folks choosing where to live and then finding a jobCreative class studieshave focused on the arts as an environmental attractionThe artistic cachet of a city is an important asset that supports the lifestyle of the creative workersNeighborhoods with higher concentrations of arts activity have higher levels of neighborhood commitment and involvement Demanding a vibrant and interesting social and night lifeThe Creative Economy is a reality, we need to embrace this new reality and recognize the role the Arts will play in the future of our neighborhood, city, and metropolitan region.More recently, creative class studies have focused on the arts as an environmental attraction by which cities lure high-value-added creative industries. The artistic cachet of a city is an important asset that supports the lifestyle of the creative workers in those industries—computer and math scientists, architects, engineers, social scientists, designers, and entertainers.HNTB Story of attracting top talent to KC - How do you compete? - For many businesses needing to attract and keep talented employees, the arts offer an incentive to relocate and remain in the greater metropolitan area
  • A growing number of corporations and businesses around the country are becoming increasingly concerned that what we teach to students is not preparing them for our changing economy and providing them with the skills necessary to succeed in that economy.  - based on the work of Daniel PinkNo longer are the 3 R’s of reading Writing and Arithmetic enough Described as the four C’s of the 21st Century, these skills include: Creativity, Collaboration, Communication, and Critical Thinking. 
  • Artists engage in creativity, collaboration, communication, and critical thinking on many levels.  The four C’s are at the heart of many artistic processes. But this is not just an artistic endeavor or an aesthetic exercise in pursuit of beauty or excellenceto collaborate and communicate with one another. These are the skills needed by our future workforce It has the potential to change the way people see the world and their place in it. From this new vantage point, new connections are made, new possibilities seen, and New opportunities created. Because the arts helped them experience the authentic creative process, aesthetic experiences opened them to deeper connections to the world and each other, Fostering both insights into customer needs and creative responses to them.
  • The vision of leaders – workable partnershipsGrowing Recognition that arts- culture-and entertainment all work togetherThis was led for the most part by private and business interests working together with some support by the public The Arts and Artists as Creative Place Makers
  • As American cities and rural communities struggle with changes in losing population the arts can play a critical role in economic development and revitalization. Creative initiatives foster cultural corridors or hubs where arts and business intersect; transforming the landscape, reviving the core of a downtown, attracting tourism, and magnetizing a neighborhood. Creative Placemaking decentralizes a grouping of cultural institutions and instead suggests that the historical or ethnic character of a place is a strength that can developed to anchor the immediate environment and highlight its uniqueness. As we witness our cities and towns looking more and more like the next city or town, it the Arts that will differentiate us. It is the Arts that will express our distinctiveness and it is the Arts that will bring innovation and creativity to our communities.
  • Cultural CorridorsAvenue of the ArtsArnold Hall in Lee’s SummitEnglewood Corridor in IndependenceBulit on and inspired by the Cross Roads Arts District success
  • PIEA Planned Industrial Expansion Authority51% or more approved art use10 year tax abatement – no increase – as value of property – increases - no increase in taxesCase Study: The Crossroads Arts DistrictLarge Institutions created CapacityUMKC Conservatory of Music & DanceKansas City Art InstituteHallmark CardsEstablishment of ArtistsRenovated BuildingTaxes & Tax AbatementsCrossroads 1.5 million in tax abatementsPIEA –EDC had a role to playUrban Housing & RevitalizationArtists are like entrepreneursFirst Friday’s 2002Led to other creative industries ArchitectsFashion DesignersAdvertising & Communication firmsIT sector Ford Foundation - 100M for creation of Artists spacesHUD 100M in integration of Art in Urban Revitalization
  • A mix of Private and Public partnershipSpurring substantial economic growth and development in the surrounding neighborhoods downtown, especially the Crossroads Arts District. The construction budget for the Todd Bolender Center for Dance and Creativity is estimated at $31 million. this facility will add additional foot traffic and visitation to the area and contribute to the stability and revenue diversification of the restored Union Station complex.Tell story of when I came here in 1984 – on Thursday night nothing going on – AMC opening people everywhere – power&light /resturants/sprint center/copaken stage – very different nowAdd NY Times quotes – KC arts scene may be better than it’s barbequeVenice #1 Musical in Times Magazine critic36 hours in KC – New York times – KC as culturally rich
  • Kansas City emerging as “America’s Creative Crossroads” Throughout history, Kansas City has been recognized as a transportation and communications hub, but today the region is repositioning itself as “America’s Creative Crossroads” — a place where ideas and innovation intersect, contributing to a vibrant quality of life. A promotional campaign launching this fall heralds the “creative crossroads” theme. The campaign coincides with the opening of the $413 million Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts and is the result of a collaboration involving the Kansas City Convention & Visitors Association, the Kansas City Area Development Council, the Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City, the Arts Council of Johnson County, the Downtown Council of Kansas City, Mo., and the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce.  Sparked by energy and ingenuity that spans multiple generations, sectors and industries, Kansas City is driven by creativity. Authentic, innovative and inviting, Kansas City is a thriving national hub for arts and culture. The Kansas City region features a vibrant, active and cultural community where the arts are distinctive, and you can experience creativity in a way you can’t anywhere else.
  •  The arts in Kansas City are leading edge, with artists and arts venues in our region receiving regular national and international acclaim. Artists come to the Kansas City area from all over the U.S. to find inspiration, sell their work, perform or even put down new roots. “When you think of how many influences come together in Kansas City — from the east, north, south and west — you realize that creativity has come from this collision of ideas,” “These influences have been at work in Kansas City for generations, but today we are seeing their full expression in everything from the arts to science and technology.” He pointed to the Kansas City Art Institute, which last year celebrated its 125th anniversary; Hallmark Cards, now more than 100 years old; and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, founded more than 75 years ago, as examples of institutions that have fueled creativity in Kansas City. Expanding the definition of creativity to include innovation and entrepreneurship, he cited locally based companies such as Cerner, which has revolutionized medical support services; Sprint, which pioneered the use of fiber optic cable in telecommunications; Garmin, noted for innovation in navigation and communication devices; and local firms that have been at the forefront in sports architecture around the globe. He noted the legacy of the late Ewing Marion Kauffman, founder of Marion Laboratories (now Aventis), lives on in the Kauffman Foundation, the world’s largest foundation devoted to entrepreneurship. “We have a tradition of creative visionaries,” he said, “including early-day leaders such as August Meyer, president of the city’s first park board; George Kessler, the architect the park board hired to design a system of parks and boulevards for Kansas City, and J.C. Nichols, creator of the Country Club Plaza. These individuals honored art and architecture in the built environment.”  
  • The continued development of the arts community will assure continued success for the regionNeed for a vision of how the arts will develop in the future
  • The Arts Ripple Effect

    1. 1. The Arts Ripple Effect “It is in the best interest of every business – no matter its size – to support the arts. Beyond their intrinsic value, the arts add to the economic vitality and quality of life of our communities. They also unleash creative ideas in and out of the workplace, foster dialogues and increase understanding among people.” - Henry W. Bloch
    2. 2. The Arts Ripple Effect• Benefits to our Region –Economic Driver –Building Community“A creative economy is the fuel of magnificence.”-Ralph Waldo Emerson
    3. 3. Facts about the Arts and Economic Development in the Kansas City Region• Tourism in Greater Kansas City generated $641 M tax revenue in 2010 – $135 million in state taxes – $179 million in local taxes – $329 million in Federal taxes• Near 43,500 jobs with associated income of $1.4 billion were sustained by visitors to the Kansas City region last year Kansas City Convention & Visitors Association 2010
    4. 4. Facts about the Arts and Economic Development in the Kansas City Region• Kansas City hosted 21.6 million visitors in 2010; up 3.7% in 2010, after a 5.7% decline in 2009• Slightly less than half of guests arrived (48%) for overnight visits• Among the 10.4 million overnight guests, 83% came for leisure• Visitors to Kansas City spent $2.6 billion in 2010 Kansas City Convention & Visitors Association 2010
    5. 5. Community Building• Arts create a place where people want to be• The arts magnetize communities by creating shared experience• The arts can also build a community through intergenerational activity
    6. 6. Governors Summit
    7. 7. The Growing Creative Industries • Creative class studies have focused on the arts as an environmental attraction – The artistic cachet of a city is an important asset that supports the lifestyle of the creative workers – Neighborhoods with higher concentrations of arts activity have higher levels of neighborhood commitment and involvement
    8. 8. 21st Century Work Skills• Innovation & Design will drive the economy of the future• The four C’s of the 21st Century – Creativity – Collaboration – Communication – Critical Thinking
    9. 9. 21st Century Work Skills• Artists engage in creativity, collaboration, communication, and critical thinking on many levels - The four C’s are at the heart of many artistic processes - The arts act as a means of inspiring creativity and innovation
    10. 10. Private Public Partnerships• The vision of Business and Civic Leadership – Growing Recognition that arts/culture and business all work together – The Arts and Artists as Creative Place Makers
    11. 11. Creative Place Making • Business, civic, and nonprofit sectors of the community come together – Plan and create vibrant and thriving public and private spaces in a neighborhood, town, city, or region – Creative initiatives foster cultural corridors or hubs where arts and business intersect – Decentralizes a grouping of cultural institutions – The historical or ethnic character of a place is a strength
    12. 12. Creative Place Making • Mid America Regional Council Planning – Cultural Corridors • Avenue of the Arts • Arnold Hall in Lee’s Summit • Englewood Corridor in Independence • Cross Roads Arts District
    13. 13. The Crossroads Arts District• Large Institutions created Capacity – UMKC Conservatory of Music & Dance – Kansas City Art Institute – Hallmark Cards• Public & Private Partnership – 1.5M in tax abatements – 1% for Public Art Program – Sprint Center – Bonds – Downtown Council• Establishment of Artists – Renovated Building – Creative workers followed – Urban Housing & Revitalization
    14. 14. One Success led to the Next• 900M in Capital Investment – The Bloch Building – Nelson Atkins – AMC – Main street – Renovation of the Midland – The Power & Light District – The Kansas City Repertory Theater and Copaken Stage – Todd Bolender Center for Dance and Creativity – The Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts• The excellence and variety of arts choices has attracted a higher level of attention to Kansas City as a destination.
    15. 15. Next Steps• Collaborative branding Kansas City as a destination for Arts & Culture – Convention and Visitors Association – Kansas City Area Development Council – Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce – Kansas City Downtown Council – Arts Council of Johnson County – Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City
    16. 16. Next Steps• The Need for Public Support – Needed for the long-term growth and sustainability of the Arts • Continued support and growth of the ArtsKC Fund run by the Arts Council of Metropolitan Kansas City • Office of Cultural Affairs and Cultural Development • Cultural plan for the region

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