Microsoft power point in defense of art educa

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It is part of my attempt to begin a dialog to get people thinking of art education in terms of its actual value to education and to society. Art Education magazine's last issue was an attempt to start a dialog regarding creativity in general and its value, but I think it stopped short of examining the idea of visual art as the focus of so much of our culture and society. I am looking at visual awareness and visual literacy in terms of their impact on the culture and the classroom. The long term goal is to make art education part of the "core" subjects in schools. Give this a look and let me know what you think. And please send this up the line and see who else may be interested in this idea.

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Microsoft power point in defense of art educa

  1. 1. In Defense Of Art Education In the Schools Ignoring Orthodox Arguments and Embracing the Facts Ignoring Orthodox Arguments and Embracing the Facts
  2. 2. Art Educators in the Art Educators in the Public schools have Public schools have always had to justify always had to justify their subject area in their subject area in termsthat academic terms that academic gatekeepers could gatekeepers could understand. understand.
  3. 3. Orthodox Argument #1: “Students who study the arts seriously are taught to see better, to envision, to persist, to be playful and learn from mistakes, to make critical judgments and justify such judgments.” Pogrebin, R., http://www.nytimes.com /2007/08/04
  4. 4. Orthodox Argument #2: “Arts education ‘enables students “Arts education ‘enables students to grasp alternative ways of to grasp alternative ways of seeing’.” seeing’.” Pogrebin, R., http://www.nytimes.com /2007/08/04
  5. 5. Orthodox Argument #3: “Art students experience “Art students experience ‘improved critical ‘improved critical thinking’.” thinking’.” Pogrebin, R., http://www.nytimes.com /2007/08/04
  6. 6. Orthodox Argument #4: “…students who had more “…students who had more involvement in the arts in involvement in the arts in school and after school scored school and after school scored better on standardized tests.” better on standardized tests.” Pogrebin, R., http://www.nytimes.com /2007/08/04
  7. 7. Orthodox Argument #5: “…students who take art “…students who take art generally do well in school.” generally do well in school.” Pogrebin, R., http://www.nytimes.com /2007/08/04
  8. 8. All Good Arguments, But... …why should we not …why should we not begin to think about begin to think about promoting art for art’s promoting art for art’s sake? sake? A case can be A case can be made for art as a made for art as a distinct academic distinct academic discipline with… discipline with…
  9. 9. A distinct omnibus of rules… The Elements of Design The Elements of Design The Principles of Design The Principles of Design Rules of composition and Rules of composition and Balance Balance
  10. 10. Theories… Color theory Color theory Perspective Perspective Visual Communication Visual Communication Therapy Therapy
  11. 11. …And historical context The history of the world is written in the record of its art. It is art that defines and validates civilizations. The only thing left to tell the story of some lost civilizations is their art.
  12. 12. The ARTS form a major component of our culture. Art is such an omnipresent part of our culture that most people aren’t even aware of it. It’s the forest for the trees paradox… It’s the forest for the trees paradox…
  13. 13. Art’s Impact On Art’s Impact On the Economy the Economy “ ‘…the creative sector’ now makes up approximately one third of the United States economy.” Freedman, K. (2010), Rethinking Creativity: A definition to support contemporary practice, Art Education, p. 8, 63(2).
  14. 14. “The creative sector depends on the many professions that are connected to creating, viewing, and criticizing visual culture.” Painting Television Computer game design Filmmaking Sculpture Architecture Cartooning Toy design Advertising Fashion Landscape design Freedman, K. (2010), Rethinking Creativity: A definition to support contemporary practice, Art Education, p. 8, 63(2).
  15. 15. Consider Advertising Alone… The bulk of its content and delivery rely heavily upon graphic communication (the creative uses of lines, shapes, spaces, colors, etc.) to define the effective delivery of those messages. Sorry about the graphic…
  16. 16. Old ideas used to promote Art Education in the schools… (creative problem solving, deeper thinking, better test scores…) …do not effectively defend the whole idea of visual awareness/literacy, nor do they recognize the concept of creativity.
  17. 17. And how about this one? “Taking Art In School Results In Better Math Scores On Standardized Tests.” Do math teachers defend their subject by arguing that taking math makes better readers?
  18. 18. IT IS TIME FOR ART EDUCATORS TO BEGIN THINKING OF ART IN TERMS OF ITS SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT ON SOCIETY
  19. 19. Art Education is as Art Education is as meaningful to a meaningful to a comprehensive academic comprehensive academic curriculum as is math, curriculum as is math, science, language arts, social science, language arts, social science, or any of the other science, or any of the other “core” subjects. “core” subjects.
  20. 20. If exposure to art education seems to generate better students (as the orthodox arguments for it have been presented) it is because exposure to the arts opens up mental channels and gives access to understanding that other subject areas do not.
  21. 21. Exposure to the arts makes better… Thinkers Presenters Problem solvers Graphic analysts …just to name a few
  22. 22. But it But it especially especially makes… makes…
  23. 23. BETTER BETTER ARTISTS ARTISTS
  24. 24. Everything else is a bonus Copyright 2010, Donald D. Gruber, EdD

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