AN OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF     ECONOMIC THOUGHT
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An Outline of theHistory of Economic      Thought Second Edition Revised     and Expanded      ERNESTO SCREPANTI          ...
AC                  Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP    Oxford University Press is a department of the University of...
PREFACE TO THE SECOND ENGLISH              EDITIONOur satisfaction in writing the second English edition of this book is e...
vi             preface to the second english editionOnly those references to fundamental works, which no student can affor...
PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITIONOur experience in the teaching of economics and its history has made onething plain to us: tha...
viii                  preface to the first editionconsidered) fairly concise. If there is an imbalance of this type, howev...
preface to the first edition                        ixYoung. Of course any inadequacies or mistakes in this book are our o...
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CONTENTSPreface to the second edition                                          vPreface to the first edition               ...
xii                                     contents      2.2. Adam Smith                                                     ...
contents                         xiii       3.4.3. Henry Thornton                                          127       Relev...
xiv                                 contents  5.4. Carl Menger                                                      189   ...
contents                             xv       7.1.5. The multiplier and the accelerator                           241     ...
xvi                                     contents  8.5. Alternative Approaches                                             ...
contents                                   xvii        9.6.4. A comparison between some contemporary schools of           ...
xviii                                 contents    11.3. Marxist Economic Thought between Orthodoxy and Revision          4...
Introduction                         Epochs of Economic TheoryOne of the most interesting and controversial of the argumen...
2                               introduction   The period from 1815 to 1845 was one of the richest in the history ofeconom...
introduction                                  3   The great neoclassical economists of the third generation, Cassel, Paret...
4                              introductionin the middle of the fifth cycle. Each cycle begins with a period of brilliantid...
introduction                                  5factors which do not damage the substance of the scientific element. Thusthe...
6                               introductionHowever, as far as the history of economic thought is concerned, Lakatos’sappr...
introduction                                   7   Smith’s teachings thus reflected the first real historical situation in w...
8                               introductionthe political element, has the defect of reducing the problem to the singledim...
introduction                                     9‘visions’ of the scientists have a strong effect on their research activ...
10                             introductiontoward effective demand, and neither has ever gained a complete victory.Another...
introduction                                  11doctrine, and to make it something more than a syncretic sum of diversethe...
12                              introductionto sketch a reply to these problems. Here, we will briefly explain some of thei...
introduction                                  13creative energies are liberated. At the same time, the research interests ...
14                                 introductionpasses through scientific revolutions, in the end always comes down to aproc...
introduction                                        15Economic Theory (Oxford, 1985); J. Hicks, ‘ ‘‘Revolutions’’ in Econo...
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PART IFrom the Origins to Keynes
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1          The Birth of Political Economy                  1.1. Opening of the Modern World1.1.1. The end of the Middle Ag...
20                   the birth of political economyIts crucial assumption was that human intelligence is able to reach the...
the birth of political economy                            21scholastic thought, and especially in the work of Thomas Aquin...
22                  the birth of political economya stimulus to work and is not in contrast with natural law, even thoughi...
the birth of political economy                          23capitalism developed. In the textiles sector, in particular, whe...
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
An outline of the history of economic thought   screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)
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An outline of the history of economic thought screpanti and zamagni(oxford 2005 2nd ed)

  1. 1. AN OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT
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  3. 3. An Outline of theHistory of Economic Thought Second Edition Revised and Expanded ERNESTO SCREPANTI and STEFANO ZAMAGNI Translated by David Field and Lynn Kirby AC
  4. 4. AC Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide in Oxford New York Auckland Cape Town Dar es Salaam Hong Kong Karachi Kuala Lumpur Madrid Melbourne Mexico City Nairobi New Delhi Shanghai Taipei Toronto With offices in Argentina Austria Brazil Chile Czech Republic France Greece Guatemala Hungary Italy Japan Poland Portugal Singapore South Korea Switzerland Thailand Turkey Ukraine Vietnam Oxford is a registered trade mark of Oxford University Press in the UK and in certain other countries Published in the United States by Oxford University Press Inc., New York # Ernesto Screpanti and Stefano Zamagni, 2005 The moral rights of the authors have been asserted Database right Oxford University Press (maker) First published 2005 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the prior permission in writing of Oxford University Press,or as expressly permitted by law, or under terms agreed with the appropriate reprographics rights organization. Enquiries concerning reproduction outside the scope of the above should be sent to the Rights Department, Oxford University Press, at the address above You must not circulate this book in any other binding or cover and you must impose the same condition on any acquirer British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Data available Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Data available Typeset by Newgen Imaging Systems (P) Ltd., Chennai, India Printed in Great Britain on acid-free paper by Biddles Ltd., King’s Lynn, Norfolk ISBN 0–19–927913–6 (Hbk) 978–0–19–927913–5 ISBN 0–19–927914–4 (Pbk) 978–0–19–927914–2 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2
  5. 5. PREFACE TO THE SECOND ENGLISH EDITIONOur satisfaction in writing the second English edition of this book is easy toimagine: not only are we assured of the utility of our work, but also have theopportunity to enlarge and revise it. We have attempted to do this in variousways. We have removed oversights and errors; we have made a few additionsand expanded a little on all chapters; we have re-written and simplifiedvarious parts which students had found obscure or difficult to understand;lastly, we have updated the bibliography, with the aim of offering usefulsuggestions for further reading. More substantial integrations have been made to chapters 1, 2, 4, 9 and 11.In the first chapter we felt it necessary to recall the role played by humanismand the Renaissance in the birth of political economy and, in particular, thecontribution they made to the formation of ‘civil humanism’, a philosophicalapproach that fell into disuse following the advent of utilitarianism, but nowappears set for a second revival. In the chapter on Smith we have integratedour exposition of the interpretations of his thought by recalling the one thatis today considered the most convincing, that of Smith as an institutionalisteconomist. The chapter on Marx has also been enlarged to recall his conceptof man and his investigation into the social and institutional conditions ofcapitalist production, two of the most topical parts of his thinking. Lastly,in chapter 9, we have separated treatment of the post-Keynesian approachfrom the so-called ‘new Keynesian macroeconomics’, by further expandingon both and pointing out the important differences that distinguish the twoschools. We have also added a summary paragraph with a simple diagramcomparing the views of the various contemporary schools of macroeconomics.In chapter 11 we have added extensive paragraphs on evolutionary games andthe theories of growth and complexity. In addition, we have introduced a new chapter—the twelfth—whichdeals with the current situation of economic science. The state of crisiswhich has beset our discipline over the last thirty years appears even moreevident today than when we wrote the first edition of this book. Now webelieve it to be a healthy crisis and in chapter 12 we have endeavoured toexplain why. A crisis can also be a revolution. We do not pretend to knowwhat will happen in economic science over the next twenty years or so, butit seemed important to us to clarify the reason why, in our opinion, we arein the middle of a crisis of foundations that may make history begin againfrom Adam. Finally, a formal change has been made which we hope will be useful forstudents. We have removed many references to relevant works from the maintext and entered them in special bibliographic lists at the end of each chapter.
  6. 6. vi preface to the second english editionOnly those references to fundamental works, which no student can afford tooverlook, have been left in the text. Let us conclude by thanking friends and colleagues who have taken itupon themselves to read and comment on the integrations to this edition:Elettra Agliardi, Luigino Bruni, Luca Fiorito, Nicholas Theocarakis, CarloZappia, and Luca Zarri.
  7. 7. PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITIONOur experience in the teaching of economics and its history has made onething plain to us: that keeping the two subjects separate, if it was ever jus-tified, is certainly not today. In the face of the crisis of the theoreticalorthodoxies of the 1950s and 1960s, the flowering of innovations in recentyears, and the numerous rediscoveries of traditional wisdoms, it is no longeran easy task to teach economic principles. We feel it necessary, therefore, toteach economic theory by paying careful attention to its history. We havetried to satisfy this need in our book, and this already says a great deal aboutthe way it has been conceived. We have endeavoured to present traditionaltheories as living matter, as well as presenting modern theories as part of ahistorical process and not as established truths. On the one hand, we have tried to resist the double temptation ofrereading the past only in the light of the present and explaining the presentonly by the past, or, to be more precise, to avoid searching in the traditionaltheories for the seeds of the modern theories and explaining the latter assimple accumulations of knowledge. On the other hand, we have attemptedto distance ourselves from the implicit banality of the great historiographicalalternatives, such as ‘internal’ and ‘external’ history or ‘continuism’ and‘catastrophism’. We have also tried to avoid the dichotomy which still existstoday, and which seems to us to cause misleading simplifications, betweenthe ‘pure’ historians of thought, who dedicate themselves exclusively tostudying ‘facts’, and the ‘pure’ theorists, who are only interested in theevolution of the logical structure of theories. We believe that knowledge ofthe ‘environment’ in which a theory is formed is just as important asknowledge of its logical structure, and we do not accept the view that ananalysis of the emergence of a theory must be considered as an alternative tothe study of its internal structure. This historical outline is, therefore, neithera collection of discoveries nor a portrait gallery. Our choice to give a fair amount of historical weight to modern devel-opments has entailed the problem of where to end our narrative. This cannotbut be a subjective decision. We have chosen the 1970s, but we have reservedthe right to break this rule each time we felt it necessary—for example, in thecase of research work and debates which produced important results in the1980s but which began earlier. The only precaution we have taken in thesecases has been to avoid citing names and titles, with a few exceptions, andlimiting ourselves to outlining the essential elements of the most recenttheoretical developments. The reader accustomed to traditional history books may be surprised bythe large amount of space we have reserved for the thought of the last fiftyyears—approximately half the extent of a book that still remains (all things
  8. 8. viii preface to the first editionconsidered) fairly concise. If there is an imbalance of this type, however, webelieve it is that we have dedicated too little space to modern theories.Quantitative historiographical research has shown, whichever index is used,that scientific production has grown at an exponential rate in the lastfive centuries, with the remarkable consequence that certainly more than70 per cent of the scientists who have ever lived are living today, and perhapsa great many more. The decision to devote less than 70 per cent of our bookto modern theory was, in fact, prudent. Finally, we have no wish to avoid certain difficulties, or, rather,responsibilities, connected with our endeavour to treat the present ashistory. We are well aware of the danger of the attempt to be wise in thesense advocated by William James, who believed that the art lays in knowingwhat to leave out. We realize that this danger becomes greater the smallerthe distance from the material dealt with and the larger the quantity ofmaterial about which decisions must be made; but we believe that theseresponsibilities must be faced. We do not know whether we have been wise inthis sense, or to what degree, but we are convinced of one thing: even if wehave omitted many things from this book, the resulting selection has beenjustified, in fact necessitated, by the importance of the material upon whichwe focus. This book is not directed to a specialist public, nor solely to a studentaudience. We also hope to reach the educated person, or, rather, the personwho wishes to educate herself or himself. Specialist training is not, therefore,necessary to understand this book; a basic knowledge of economics, how-ever, especially the main themes of micro- and macroeconomics, would be ofhelp. This is true for most of the book. There are, however, sections, espe-cially those dealing with the modern theories, in which the analytical diffi-culties cannot be avoided without falling into the trap of oversimplification.In these cases, which we have tried to keep to a minimum, we have chosen toavoid banality and to ask the reader for a little more effort. This knowledge of the audience to whom the book is directed may help inunderstanding several things about its structure; we have chosen, forexample, to avoid weighing down the narrative with footnotes, a choice thathas often restricted us, but which we hope will benefit the reader. On theother hand the bibliographies presented at the end of each chapter do notpretend to be complete; they contain, apart from details of works quotedfrom, only a short guide to further reading. Finally, we should like to express our gratitude to the many colleagues andfriends who have kindly and generously agreed to read and comment on thefirst drafts of our book, or on parts of it. In particular we would like tomention Duccio Cavalieri, Marco Dardi, Franco Donzelli, Riccardo Faucci,Giorgio Gattei, Augusto Graziani, Peter Groenewegen, Vinicio Guidi, GeoffHodgson, Alan Kirman, Jan Kregel, Marcello Messori, Pierluigi Nuti,Fabio Petri, Pier Luigi Porta, Maurizio Pugno, Piero Tani, and Warren
  9. 9. preface to the first edition ixYoung. Of course any inadequacies or mistakes in this book are our own soleresponsibility. Our thanks also go to Andrew Schuller and Anna Zaranko ofOxford University Press for their perceptive editorial work and advice. E. S. S. Z.
  10. 10. This page intentionally left blank
  11. 11. CONTENTSPreface to the second edition vPreface to the first edition viiIntroduction 1 PART I FROM THE ORIGINS TO KEYNES1. The Birth of Political Economy 19 1.1. Opening of the Modern World 19 1.1.1. The end of the Middle Ages and scholasticism 19 1.1.2. Communes, humanism and the Renaissance 22 1.1.3. The expansion of ‘Mercantile’ capitalism 27 1.1.4. The Scientific Revolution and the birth of political economy 29 1.2. Mercantilism 32 1.2.1. Bullionism 32 1.2.2. Mercantilist commercial theories and policies 34 1.2.3. Demographic theories and policies 36 1.2.4. Monetary theories and policies 38 1.2.5. Hume’s criticism 40 1.2.6. Theories of value 41 1.3. Some Forerunners of Classical Political Economy 43 1.3.1. The premisses of a theoretical revolution 43 1.3.2. William Petty and ‘political arithmetick’ 45 1.3.3. Locke, North, and Mandeville 47 1.3.4. Boisguillebert and Cantillon 49 Relevant Works 51 Bibliography 522. The Laissez-Faire Revolution and Smithian Economics 54 2.1. The Laissez-Faire Revolution 54 2.1.1. The preconditions of the Industrial Revolution 54 2.1.2. Quesnay and the physiocrats 55 2.1.3. Galiani and the Italians 58 2.1.4. Hume and Steuart 63
  12. 12. xii contents 2.2. Adam Smith 65 2.2.1. The ‘mechanical clock’ and the ‘invisible hand’ 65 2.2.2. Accumulation and the distribution of income 68 2.2.3. Value 69 2.2.4. Market and competition 72 2.2.5. Smith’s three souls 73 2.2.6. Smith as an institutionalist 77 2.3. The Smithian Orthodoxy 82 2.3.1. An era of optimism 82 2.3.2. Bentham and utilitarianism 83 2.3.3. The Smithian economists and Say 85 Relevant Works 87 Bibliography 883. From Ricardo to Mill 90 3.1. Ricardo and Malthus 90 3.1.1. Thirty years of crisis 90 3.1.2. The Corn Laws 91 3.1.3. The theory of rent 92 3.1.4. Profits and wages 95 3.1.5. Profits and over-production 96 3.1.6. Discussions on value 97 3.2. The Disintegration of Classical Political Economy in the Age of Ricardo 100 3.2.1. The Ricardians, Ricardianism, and the classical tradition 100 3.2.2. The anti-Ricardian reaction 102 3.2.3. Cournot and Dupuit 104 3.2.4. Gossen and von Thunen ¨ 107 3.2.5. The Romantics and the German Historical School 109 3.3. The Theories of Economic Harmony and Mill’s Synthesis 111 3.3.1. The ‘Age of Capital’ and the theories of economic harmony 111 3.3.2. John Stuart Mill 113 3.3.3. Wages and the wages fund 115 3.3.4. Capital and the wages fund 118 3.4. English Monetary Theories and Debates in the Age of Classical Economics 121 3.4.1. The Restriction Act 121 3.4.2. The Bank Charter Act 124
  13. 13. contents xiii 3.4.3. Henry Thornton 127 Relevant Works 130 Bibliography 1314. Socialist Economic Thought and Marx 133 4.1. From Utopia to Socialism 133 4.1.1. The birth of the workers’ movement 133 4.1.2. The two faces of Utopia 134 4.1.3. Saint-Simon and Fourier 135 4.2. Socialist Economic Theories 138 4.2.1. Sismondi, Proudhon, Rodbertus 138 4.2.2. Godwin and Owen 139 4.2.3. The Ricardian socialists and related theorists 140 4.3. Marx’s Economic Theory 142 4.3.1. Marx and the classical economists 142 4.3.2. Exploitation in the production process 146 4.3.3. Exploitation and value 148 4.3.4. The transformation of values into prices 151 4.3.5. Equilibrium, Say’s Law, and crises 154 4.3.6. Wages, the trade cycle, and the ‘laws of movement’ of the capitalist economy 155 4.3.7. Monetary aspects of the cycle and the crisis 159 Relevant Works 161 Bibliography 1625. The Triumph of Utilitarianism and the Marginalist Revolution 163 5.1. The Marginalist Revolution 163 5.1.1. The ‘climax’ of the 1870s and 1880s 163 5.1.2. The neoclassical theoretical system 165 5.1.3. Was it a real revolution? 167 5.1.4. The reasons for success 170 5.2. William Stanley Jevons 173 5.2.1. Logical calculus in economics 173 5.2.2. Wages and labour, interest and capital 176 5.2.3. English historical economics 179 5.3. Leon Walras ´ 180 5.3.1. Walras’s vision of the working of the economic system 180 5.3.2. General economic equilibrium 183 5.3.3. Walras and the articulation of economic science 187
  14. 14. xiv contents 5.4. Carl Menger 189 5.4.1. The birth of the Austrian School and the Methodenstreit 189 5.4.2. The centrality of the theory of marginal utility in Menger 192 Relevant Works 193 Bibliography 1946. The Construction of Neoclassical Orthodoxy 196 ´ 6.1. The Belle Epoque 196 6.2. Marshall and the English Neoclassical Economists 198 6.2.1. Alfred Marshall 198 6.2.2. Competition and equilibrium in Marshall 200 6.2.3. Marshall’s social philosophy 202 6.2.4. Pigou and welfare economics 203 6.2.5. Wicksteed and ‘the exhaustion of the product’ 205 6.2.6. Edgeworth and bargaining negotiation 207 6.3. Neoclassical Theory in America 209 6.3.1. Clark and the marginal-productivity theory 209 6.3.2. Fisher: inter-temporal choice and the quantity theory of money 212 6.4. Neoclassical Theory in Austria and Sweden 215 6.4.1. The Austrian School and subjectivism 215 6.4.2. The Austrian School joins the mainstream 217 6.4.3. Wicksell and the origins of the Swedish School 218 6.5. Pareto and the Italian Neoclassical Economists 223 6.5.1. From cardinal utility to ordinalism 223 6.5.2. Pareto’s criterion and the new welfare economics 226 6.5.3. Barone, Pantaleoni, and the ‘Paretaio’ 227 Relevant Works 229 Bibliography 2307. The Years of High Theory: I 232 7.1. Problems of Economic Dynamics 232 7.1.1. Economic hard times . . . 232 7.1.2. Money in disequilibrium 234 7.1.3. The Stockholm School 236 7.1.4. Production and expenditure 238
  15. 15. contents xv 7.1.5. The multiplier and the accelerator 241 7.1.6. The Harrod–Domar model 243 7.2. John Maynard Keynes 245 7.2.1. English debates on economic policy 245 7.2.2. How Keynes became Keynesian 249 7.2.3. The General Theory: effective demand and employment 251 7.2.4. The General Theory: liquidity preference 254 7.3. Michał Kalecki 258 7.3.1. The level of income and its distribution 258 7.3.2. The trade cycle 260 7.4. Joseph Alois Schumpeter 262 7.4.1. Equilibrium and development 262 7.4.2. The trade cycle and money 265 Relevant Works 266 Bibliography 2688. The Years of High Theory: II 270 8.1. The Theory of Market Forms 270 8.1.1. The first signs of dissent 270 8.1.2. Sraffa’s criticism of the Marshallian theoretical system 271 8.1.3. Chamberlin’s theory of monopolistic competition 273 8.1.4. Joan Robinson’s theory of imperfect competition 275 8.1.5. The decline of the theory of market forms 278 8.2. The Theory of General Economic Equilibrium 280 8.2.1. The first existence theorems and von Neumann’s model 280 8.2.2. The English reception of the Walrasian approach 284 8.2.3. Value and demand in Hicks 286 8.2.4. General economic equilibrium in Hicks 287 8.2.5. The IS-LM model 289 8.3. The New Welfare Economics 291 8.3.1. Robbins’s epistemological setting 291 8.3.2. The Pareto criterion and compensation tests 292 8.4. The Debate on Economic Calculation under Socialism 295 8.4.1. The dance begins 295 8.4.2. The neoclassical socialism of Lange and Lerner 296 8.4.3. Von Hayek’s criticism 298
  16. 16. xvi contents 8.5. Alternative Approaches 299 8.5.1. Allyn Young and increasing returns 299 8.5.2. Thorstein Veblen 301 8.5.3. Institutional thought in the inter-war years 304 8.5.4. From Dmitriev to Leontief 308 8.5.5. The reawakening of Marxist economic theory 313 Relevant Works 316 Bibliography 318 PART II CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENTS OF ECONOMIC THEORY9. Contemporary Macroeconomic Theories 323 9.1. From the Golden Age to Stagflation 323 9.2. The Neoclassical Synthesis 325 9.2.1. Generalizations: the IS-LM model again 325 9.2.2. Refinements: the consumption function 328 9.2.3. Corrections: money and inflation 330 9.2.4. Simplifications: growth and distribution 333 9.3. The Monetarist Counter-Revolution 335 9.3.1. Act I: money matters 335 9.3.2. Act II: ‘you can’t fool all the people all the time’ 337 9.3.3. Act III: the students go beyond the master 340 9.3.4. Was it real glory? 343 9.4. From Disequilibrium to Non-Walrasian Equilibrium 346 9.4.1. Disequilibrium and the microfoundations of macroeconomics 346 9.4.2. The non-Walrasian equilibrium models 347 9.5. The Post-Keynesian Approach 351 9.5.1. Anti-neoclassical reinterpretations of Keynes 351 9.5.2. Distribution and growth 353 9.5.3. Money and the instability of the capitalist economy 358 9.5.4. Heterodox microfoundations of macroeconomics 360 9.6. The New Keynesian Macroeconomics 363 9.6.1. A distant Hicksian background 363 9.6.2. Nominal rigidities 365 9.6.3. Real rigidities 368
  17. 17. contents xvii 9.6.4. A comparison between some contemporary schools of macroeconomics 371 Relevant Works 374 Bibliography 37710. Neoclassical Economics from Triumph to Crisis 380 10.1. The Neo-Walrasian Approach to General Economic Equilibrium 380 10.1.1. The conquest of the existence theorem 380 10.1.2. Defeat on the grounds of uniqueness and stability 384 10.1.3. The end of a world? 388 10.1.4. Temporary equilibrium and money in general-equilibrium theory 394 10.2. Developments in the New Welfare Economics and the Economic Theories of Justice 396 10.2.1. The two fundamental theorems of welfare economics 396 10.2.2. The debate about market failures and Coase’s theorem 400 10.2.3. The theory of social choice: Arrow’s impossibility theorem 404 10.2.4. Sen and the critique of utilitarianism 406 10.2.5. Economic theories of justice 409 10.3. The Controversy on Marginalism in the Theory of the Firm and Markets 413 10.3.1. Critiques of the neoclassical theory of the firm 413 10.3.2. Post-Keynesian theories of the firm 415 10.3.3. Managerial and behavioural theories 418 10.3.4. The neoclassical reaction and the new theories of the firm 420 Relevant Works 423 Bibliography 42611. At the Margins of Orthodoxy 428 11.1. Games, Evolution and Growth 428 11.1.1. Game theory 428 11.1.2. Evolutionary games and institutions 432 11.1.3. The theory of endogenous growth 435 11.2. The Theory of Production as a Circular Process 437 11.2.1. Activity analysis and the non-substitution theorem 437 11.2.2. The debate on the theory of capital 440 11.2.3. Production of commodities by means of commodities 444
  18. 18. xviii contents 11.3. Marxist Economic Thought between Orthodoxy and Revision 446 11.3.1. Marxist thought before 1968 446 11.3.2. Marxist heresies 449 11.3.3. Toward a theory of value with the feet on the ground 451 Relevant Works 453 Bibliography 45512. A Post-Smithian Revolution? 456 12.1. At the Threshold of the Millennium 456 12.1.1. Globalization 456 12.1.2. Modern and post-modern 461 12.2. Sources of Contemporary Institutionalist and Evolutionary Theory: Four Unconventional Economists 466 12.2.1. Karl Polanyi 466 12.2.2. Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen 469 12.2.3. Albert O. Hirschman 472 12.2.4. Richard M. Goodwin 473 12.3. Approaches to Institutional Analysis 475 12.3.1. The ‘new political economy’ and surroundings 475 12.3.2. Contractarian neo-institutionalism 476 12.3.3. Utilitarian neo-institutionalism 479 12.3.4. The new ‘old’ institutionalism 484 12.3.5. Evolutionary neo-institutionalism 489 12.3.6. Irreversibilities, increasing returns, and complexity 491 12.3.7. Von Hayek and the neo-Austrian school 495 12.4. Radical Political Economy 500 12.4.1. The monetary circuit and structural change theories 500 12.4.2. Analytical Marxism 503 12.4.3. Post-Marxism 508 12.4.4. The feminist challenge 510 12.5. Beyond Homo oeconomicus 512 Relevant Works 515 Bibliography 519Index of Subjects 523Index of Names 543
  19. 19. Introduction Epochs of Economic TheoryOne of the most interesting and controversial of the arguments put forwardby Schumpeter in The History of Economic Analysis is that the evolution ofeconomic ideas does not proceed smoothly, but in jumps, through a suc-cession of epochs of revolution and consolidation; of language confusionand ‘classical’ periods. This is also a useful idea for the historian of economicthought because, if true, it would provide a clear organizational frameworkfor the subject. In fact, this idea immediately leads to an almost naturaldivision of the history of economic thought into epochs, a division based ona succession of ‘classical situations’ and revolutionary periods. Here, whileagreeing with Schumpeter that any periodization, ‘though certainly basedupon provable facts’, must not ‘be taken too seriously’ (p. 52), we willattempt one inspired by his idea. Modern economic science originates from a first great theoreticalrevolution that occurred, roughly, in the period, 1750–80. This was an epochof great breaks with tradition; an epoch that began with Galiani, Beccaria,and Hume, continued through Genovesi, Verri, Ortes, Steuart, Anderson,Condillac, Mirabeau, Quesnay, Turgot, and the whole physiocratic move-ment; and reached its climax with The Wealth of Nations. There was achaotic flow of audacious and brilliant ideas which, even allowing for thediversity of, and conflicts among, the various approaches, was driven for-ward by a few fundamental themes. Common to many of these authors wasthe revolt against mercantilism, the perception or the foreboding that therewas to be a deep revolution in the economic structure of society, the faith innatural laws and in the possibility of understanding them scientifically, and,above all, the belief in free trade, which, even if it was only professed by someof the above-mentioned economists, was soon to become the basic ideologyof the new science. The Wealth of Nations was the supreme synthesis of allthis work. For twenty years after its appearance, as Schumpeter suggests,‘there is little to report as far as analytical work is concerned’ (p. 379). In fact, the recovery from theoretical stagnation occurred with the ‘neweconomics’, immediately after the Napoleonic wars, and was started byRicardo. He, far from being a servile follower of Smith, set to work on thearguments which differentiated his opinions from those of the greatauthorities—the greatest of which was The Wealth of Nations. Ricardo wasthe first of a long series of great innovators, among the most important ofwhom were Sismondi, Malthus, Torrens, Bailey, Hodgskin, Thunen, ¨Longfield, Rae, Senior, Cournot, Dupuit, List, Rodbertus, Jones, andRoscher.
  20. 20. 2 introduction The period from 1815 to 1845 was one of the richest in the history ofeconomic thought as well as that of socialist thought. (Owen, Saint-Simon,Fourier, Cabet, Blanqui, Rodbertus, and Proudhon all worked in thisperiod.) It was a period of crisis, as shown by the heterogeneous nature of thetheories which fought for positions in the field: Ricardian, Ricardiansocialists, Continental socialists, the old German Historical School, and the‘anti-Ricardian reaction’. The last was the most heterogeneous of all, andonly later was it acknowledged as the precursor of the marginalist revolution.Despite, or perhaps because of, the diverse and contrasting flows of ideas, thedoctrinal counter-positions, and the Babel’s tower of terminologies andconcepts, this period produced a supreme wealth of seeds, some of whichwere soon to bear fruit, others much later. It was J. S. Mill who restored economics as a normal science made up ofestablished and lasting truths, and with him the epoch closed. It was followedby a new period of stagnation, if not decadence: the age of Fawcett andCairnes in England and Bastiat in France, while in Germany the innovativespur faded away with the affirmation of the historical school. After Bastiat,Reybaud could state that work in political economy had almost beenexhausted and that there was nothing else to discover. Cairnes, too, believedthat the work of political economy was ‘pretty well fulfilled’. It was 1870! Butstill in 1876, as Schumpeter reminds us, there was a feeling that ‘thoughmuch remained for economists to do in the way of development andapplication of existing doctrine, the great work had been done’ (p. 830). Yet it was just at that time that a new revolution was breaking through.The marginalist revolution occurred between 1870 and 1890: it was openedby Menger, Jevons, and Walras, was continued by Edgeworth, Wieser,Bohm-Bawerk, Pantaleoni, and Clark, and closed by Fisher and Marshall. ¨Also in this period, due to its revolutionary and transitional nature, therewas no predominant orthodoxy; in fact, the epoch was characterized byconflict among a remarkable number of contrasting theoretical positions.First of all, there was a revival of socialist theories in the most diverse forms,from the Marxist school to the Fabians and from Christian to agrariansocialism. Institutionalism and the Young Historical School (not onlyGerman) also began during this period and were to develop more fully later.Finally, it is important to note that there were major differences in approach,among the marginalist writers themselves, which caused bitter controversies.These were so widespread that still today it is difficult to recognize ahomogeneous school of thought in the early marginalist approaches. Theirway of seeing the world, in any case, seemed new and unfamiliar to manytheorists, and this caused a great deal of resistance. It was only in the 1890sthat a new ‘classical situation’ was established, and a new feeling of reposespread among the economists. In fact, it was only towards the end of thecentury that the fundamental homogeneity of the various versions ofmarginalist theory was perceived by the historians of economic thought.
  21. 21. introduction 3 The great neoclassical economists of the third generation, Cassel, Pareto,and Wicksell, were lucky enough to work within what had almost become anew tradition and orthodoxy, and had no need, therefore, to be revolu-tionary. The next revolutionary period occurred during the years of ‘hightheory’, in the 1920s and 1930s. It was, as G. L. S. Shackle stated, ‘animmense creative spasm . . . yielding six or seven major innovations of theory,which together have completely altered the orientation and character ofeconomics’ (The Years of High Theory, p. 5). But perhaps there were morethan six or seven: a great many of the modern theories of growth, cycle,input–output relations, firm, general equilibrium, money, expectations,employment, distribution, demand, welfare, planning, and socialism—originate from the seeds sown in those years. Coming to the epoch in which we live, there is no doubt that a newclassical situation was created during the 1950s and 1960s. Even thoughdissent was not completely silenced, as shown by the post-Keynesian attackson the neoclassical theory of distribution and growth and by the clamour ofthe debate on capital theory, it is evident that the ‘neoclassical synthesis’constituted at that time the authentic ‘single track’ for economic research.Beginning with the attempt to graft the Keynesian seedling onto the oldtrunk of marginalist theory, the neoclassical synthesis culminated in animpressive ordering of ideas and suggestions derived from the years of thehigh theory. Then, strengthened by the formal elegance of the Arrow–Debreu–McKenzie general-equilibrium model, the theoretical versatility ofthe Hicks–Modigliani macroeconomic-equilibrium model, and the analyticalsimplicity of the Solow–Swan growth-and-distribution model, it was ableto orient economic research and economic policy in a way that no otherscientific orthodoxy had been able to do. Moreover, the fact that it evenmanaged to transform the critical potential of many dissident theories intointernal debates is a demonstration of its hegemonic strength. During the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s the castle of neoclassical orthodoxyunderwent a sort of a breakdown. The last thirty years have constitutedanother period of theoretical confusion. A large number of theories haveemerged, all, to differing degrees, imperfect, fascinating, and revolutionary.None is completely satisfactory, none dominant. From the ‘new classicalmacroeconomics’ to the non-Walrasian equilibrium theory, from post-Keynesian theories to the various neo-institutionalist approaches, andfrom the neo-Austrian schools to post- and neo-Marxism (the last beingsubdivided into several versions, Sraffian, anti-Sraffian, regulationist, neo-Schumpeterian, Keynesian, etc.), competition in modern academic marketsin again strong, incessant, and almost perfect. Thus, in 250 years of the history of economic thought, from the middle ofthe eighteenth century to the present day, there have been four great cycles ofprogress followed by periods of stagnation of ideas, four long revolutionaryphases followed by four equally long consolidation phases. We are now right
  22. 22. 4 introductionin the middle of the fifth cycle. Each cycle begins with a period of brilliantideas, innovations, and breaks with the tradition, controversies, bitterconflicts, and terminological confusion; in short, a stimulating process ofcreative destruction in the production of economic ideas. Old schoolsdisintegrate, dwarfs give way to giants and, just when one believes thateconomic science has attained perfection, chaos breaks out again. Later, outof that hive of activity, the need for a new synthesis gradually emerges. Thisis finally reached after two or three decades, and produces a new classicalsituation. Then, for another twenty or thirty years political economybecomes a tranquil profession again: stable academic circles form, andmembers of the profession return to concerns with elegance, generality, andthe solution of puzzles. Research follows well-trodden paths and producesexcellent textbooks, refinements, generalizations, and varied applications. Plurality of InterpretationsThe subjective nature of the criteria we have adopted to decide what is to beconsidered innovative or orthodox is inevitable, as is the ‘qualitative’ natureof the periodization derived from it. We are also aware of the inadequacy ofour appeal to the authority of Schumpeter. On the other hand, the idea thateconomic science progresses in jumps rather than in linear progressionshould not cause concern; rather, the problem is how to take account of thisphenomenon. One position is represented by the so-called ‘incrementalist’ approach tothe history of economic thought; an approach according to which ‘scientificprogress’ has been compared—for example, by Pantaleoni—‘to the growthof a snowball which rolls down a mountain slope, gathering extra snow, withits surface representing the unknown’ (Scritti varii di economia, p. 4). Thispoint of view implies the possibility, according to Pantaleoni, of separatingeconomic science from its metaphysical contour, or rather, according toSchumpeter, separating analysis from visions. By thus reducing the historyof economic thought to that of analysis (or ‘science’), it is conceived as thenarration of the slow and continual growth in knowledge: looking back-wards through time, and ‘starting from what economic science is in thepresent moment’, its history will be a ‘history of the economic truths’(Pantaleoni, p. 484). In recent times, the most convinced supporters of thispoint of view have been neoclassical economists such as Knight, Stigler,Blaug, and Gordon. But it is not a point of view which originated withinneoclassical theory; Say and Ferrara, for example, had held it before. Obviously, the supporters of this position do not accept that the historyof economic thought proceeds in jumps and advances by revolutions.Crises, periods of stagnation, and slow-downs are admitted, but only asperverse effects of the ‘metaphysical foundations’ and the psychologicalconditions in which the individual authors formulated their theories, all
  23. 23. introduction 5factors which do not damage the substance of the scientific element. Thustheir history would be a history of mistakes. A different point of view, which has been called ‘catastrophist’ or ‘dis-continuist’, is linked to Kuhn’s theory of the structure of scientific revolu-tions. This approach, which views the evolution of knowledge as passingthrough revolutions and explains the latter as caused by the accumulation ofanomalies within the dominant paradigms, seems extremely useful in tack-ling the problem we have raised. However, the application of Kuhn’sarguments to the history of economic thought has encountered serious dif-ficulties, difficulties which can be linked both to the ambiguities of theKuhnian definition of a ‘paradigm’ and to its origin in the history of thenatural sciences. So much so that the characteristics of a truly Kuhnianrevolution in the history of economic thought have only been identified, andthen not without controversy, in the Keynesian revolution. In fact, thisrevolution could be interpreted, not as a theoretical response to the stimulussupplied by the occurrence, in a historically determined socio-institutionalenvironment, of some new economic facts (crisis, depression, price rigidity,or mass unemployment), but as the realization of the importance of someanomalies which had always existed and yet had always been relegated to thefootnotes by the dominant paradigm. But how does this idea fit in with thefact that the Keynesian revolution was only part of the process of deepupheaval which engulfed the years of high theory? About other revolutions,many neoclassical economists deny that it is possible to find those charac-teristics in the marginalist revolution, and refuse even to acknowledge itsrevolutionary nature, believing instead that it consisted of the purification,refinement, and generalization of the truly scientific elements which werealready present in classical economics. Finally, the free-trade and Ricardianrevolutions cannot be analysed according to Kuhn’s schema, as they werelinked to a great historical event, the birth of industrial capitalism, and notdetermined by a logic which was strictly internal to the evolution of aparadigm. Recently, there have also been attempts to apply Lakatos’s ‘methodologyof the scientific research programmes’ to the history of economic thought.The best-known examples are those by Weintraub and Latsis. According tothis approach, a research programme will be successful if it shows itself tobe progressive, both theoretically (being able to predict new facts) andempirically (if such predictions are confirmed). It will be abandoned whenit becomes degenerating (needing to be modified in order to account forknown facts without being able to predict new ones), and if a ‘better’programme—i.e. one that is endowed with greater empirical content—isavailable. The attempts to apply Lakatos’s approach to economics haveproduced interesting results with regard to research methodology, especiallyin the direction of weakening faith in empiricist and positivist epistemo-logies, and of a greater open-mindedness towards methodological pluralism.
  24. 24. 6 introductionHowever, as far as the history of economic thought is concerned, Lakatos’sapproach has not produced decisively important results and has, on thecontrary, represented a step backwards relative to Kuhn, who at leastadmitted the importance, if not the centrality, of scientific revolutions.Lakatos’s approach, instead—especially because of the emphasis it places onthe ‘progressiveness’ of successful research programmes, and on their greaterempirical content relative to those which have been surpassed—seems to bemoving towards a resumption of the ‘incrementalist’ arguments. Both the incrementalist and catastrophist approaches are open to criticismat the level of their similar epistemological roots. They have in common apoint of view which Blaug, in Economic Theory in Retrospect, has defined as‘absolutist’ (pp. 20–1)—in the sense that the historian is only interested in theintellectual development of the theories, without being concerned with theirrelationships to the socio-economic conditions in which they emerged. Theabsolutist point of view is clearly present in the incrementalist approach, forwhich the evolution of thought is nothing more than a series of marginalincrements of knowledge upon a stock of aquired truth. But this is also trueof the catastrophist approach, in which scientific revolutions are caused by athreshold effect generated by the accumulation of anomalies within eachparadigm. In both cases there is no way of linking changes in thought tochanges in social and economic life. The approach which studies the history of economic ideas in relation tosocio-economic contexts in which they have arisen has been defined by Blaugas ‘relativist’ (pp. 20–1). With a little more vis polemica, Pantaleoni called it‘mesological’ (p. 491). It is a point of view which is held by a large number ofinstitutionalist, historicist, and Marxist scholars, and, in general, byhistorians with non-positivist backgrounds. Mitchell, Stark, Roll, Rogin,and Dasgupta, to name a few, are all authors who have explicitly theorizedand knowingly utilized the mesological approach. The epistemologicalfoundation of this position is based—according to Roll—‘on the convictionthat the economic structure of any given epoch and the changes which itundergoes are the major influences on economic thinking’ (A History ofEconomic Thought, p. 14). One of the mesological approaches aims at identifying the relationshipsexisting between economic theory and the real socioeconomic structure. Andthe simplest type of relationship seems to be that between a historicallydetermined reality and a specific thought that ‘reflects’ it. Working alongthis line, Stark has proposed an interpretation of the Schumpeterian notionof ‘classical situations’ which leads to a simple and apparently obviousexplanation of the phenomenon in question. When comparing the classicalsituations represented by the theories of Smith and Walras, Stark observedthat, while these are two different doctrines, they are still two theories ofequilibrium. He suggests that they reflect two different economic orderswhich prevailed in different historical epochs.
  25. 25. introduction 7 Smith’s teachings thus reflected the first real historical situation in whichthe capitalist order was in equilibrium conditions, an equilibrium based onthe small, non-mechanized factory and on an exchange economy fullydeveloped within a national market, in which the invisible hand was ableto integrate agricultural with industrial production. On the other hand,Walras’s system represented an international economic order in whichcompetition was almost perfect, both on the commodity and labour markets,at least in the most developed economies. Stark says nothing about the other classical situations, neither does heoffer clarification about what is reflected by the theoretical formulationswhich occur in periods of intellectual revolution. But his arguments seemperfectly compatible with the following suggestion by Shackle concerningthe state of economic theory in the 1920s: these years had marked the end of‘a belief in a self-regulating, inherently and naturally self-optimizing, stableand coherent system’ (p. 5). When the economists realized that they were nolonger able, with the old intellectual instruments, to restore the old order ofthings, they began to search for new theories; in this way, by the end of the1930s economic science ‘had come to terms with the restless anarchy anddisorder of the world of fact’ (p. 6). This point of view has an unpleasantpremiss: that social reality is only the object and thought only the subject ofscientific activity, such that the latter does not obey the laws which governthe former and is able to reflect them objectively. Equally unpleasant con-sequences would be that the evolution of economic theory is unequivocallydetermined by the evolution of the objective reality; and that, once again,there is (even though through a series of oscillations) a certain type ofprogress through the accumulation of truth. Another group of mesological approaches considers the political elementas the most important link between theory and reality. This is the well-known argument of the ‘political demand’ for economic ideas, according towhich the emergence of specific, real economic problems stimulates thecreation of political solutions and therefore of theories which are capable ofscientifically justifying those solutions. Then, the theories which supply thecorrect solutions are grouped together and are slowly refined until anorthodox theoretical system is formed. Myrdal developed a similar conception, but added several interestingobservations concerning the role played by the process of younger genera-tions replacing older ones within scientific communities. The study of thenew facts which emerge in the course of economic evolution, would modifypolitical attitudes, especially among young researchers. These, rather thanthe older upholders of the orthodoxy, would be able to change the directionsof research ‘under the pressure of what is becoming politically importantto the society’ (‘Crises and Cycles in the Development of Economics’, p. 20).It is in this way that recurrent theoretical revolutions would be triggered.This position, even though it has the merit of giving the right weight to
  26. 26. 8 introductionthe political element, has the defect of reducing the problem to the singledimension of the adjustment of theories to problems: there is still the ideathat the economist observes reality as in a laboratory and is not influencedby it. These difficulties are not encountered by Neumark, who suggests thatthere is normally only one choice open to solve the fundamental economicproblems: the choice between two great alternatives; and that this explainsnot only the perpetual oscillation of the dominant positions in economicpolicy between state control and laissez-faire, protectionism and free trade,balancing the budget and deficit spending, but also the oscillation offundamental theoretical attitudes between preferences for the conceptionsof value as ‘natural’ and ‘just’, between idealistic and materialist philo-sophies, and between industrialism and environmentalism. Our Point of ViewThis outline of the history of economic thought is not intended to be either ahistory of illustrious people, their lives, their work, and their personal con-tributions to the discovery of the truth, or a history of the errors by which thegrowth of scientific knowledge has occurred. We do not share the idea thateconomics is a ‘Darwinian’ discipline, an idea which claims that the last linkin the evolutionary chain contains all the preceding developments, and thatthese can all be dismissed as irrelevant or superseded. Certainly, we do notdeny the existence of some form of evolution in the process of historicalchange of economic ideas. However, we deny that it is a unidirectional,homogeneous, and unique development; above all, we deny that the key tounderstanding this process must necessarily be provided by the theorieswhich are in fashion today. The approach that we follow has a great deal in common with the relativistposition. We wish, however, to avoid falling into certain ‘mesological’naıvities and simplifications, which often contribute to the production of ¨histories of economic thought by portraits, or treating the evolution of ideasas an appendix to the evolution of economic facts. We realize that the realitystudied by the economist is not fixed like that of the natural sciences.Economic facts change through time and space: problems which appearcrucial in a certain period may be irrelevant in another, and those that areconsidered important in one country can be completely ignored in another.This peculiarity of the subject of investigation may help to explain part of thehistory of economic thought, for instance, the existence of certain nationalpeculiarities or the emergence of specific theories at certain historicalmoments. But this does not explain everything, and perhaps it does notexplain precisely what really deserves to be studied. More important than the peculiarities of the object under study are thoseof the subject itself. There is no doubt that the cultural background and the
  27. 27. introduction 9‘visions’ of the scientists have a strong effect on their research activities; andstill more determinant are the common ideas and values accepted by thescientific communities, as it is precisely these which select and give directionto the individuals. But, more generally, there is no doubt that it is theparticular society as a whole which determines the cultural climate in whichthe choices available to individual scientists and the scientific community areprovided and delimited. Society as a whole decrees the importance of theproblems to be studied, establishes the directions in which solutions shouldbe sought, and, ultimately, decides which theories are correct. None of this would merit our attention if society were a homogeneousentity. But it is not. In the field of the social sciences, a theory is a form ofself-understanding and self-representation of a social subject. The subjectsare heterogeneous, however: there are differences of class, culture, andnationality. Moreover, the relationships in which these subjects find them-selves may be conflictual. Thus society, while being a severe judge of sci-entific work, is not always impartial, nor does it always have clear ideas aboutwhat it wants. And if it is true that only society decides the relevance ofthe problems, it is also true that its decisions are often ambiguous andcontradictory. For example, some people consider an unemployment rate of5 per cent as worrying, while others believe a 10 per cent rate is normal, even‘natural’; and it is inevitable that these two different ways of thinking areconnected to two contrasting economic theories. Still more fleeting andbiased are the criteria by which society decrees which theories are correct,because, in the end, as there is ‘only one truth’, the plurality of points of view,solutions, and directions of research which society itself generates must insome way be suppressed in favour of a single theory. Obviously, the work ofthe scientists has an important role in establishing which theory shouldprevail, as there are requirements of logical coherence, generality, andexplanatory power to which it is their duty to attend. They are not the kingsof the castle, however, and cannot do whatever they wish. On some subjects and fundamental problems, base orientations are formedwhich embody diverse and often contradictory points of view. Theseorientations give rise to strands of research which span the history of eco-nomic thought. They are like rivers on limestone which sometimes disappearunderground, giving the impression that they have dried up; but they cancontinue their underground life for a long time, banned from academia anddeprived of scientific respectability. Then they come to light again, whennobody expects it, and become more powerful and noisy until they silencetheir opponents. For example, consider the orientation underlying criticismof Say’s Law and its use to demonstrate the impossibility of ‘general gluts’.Who would have thought, considering the defeat of Malthus by Ricardo, orthe sad academic destiny of Marx or Hobson, that with Keynes, justicewould have been done? In regard to this problem, two base orientations havealways been in conflict, one leaning towards self-regulating markets, the other
  28. 28. 10 introductiontoward effective demand, and neither has ever gained a complete victory.Another example comes from the theory of value, where the subjectivist andobjectivist orientations have clashed continuously. It seemed that Jevons hadfinally defeated Ricardo, but then, a century later, Sraffa put everything backinto discussion. We could go on to show the alternating destinies of thequantitative and endogenous orientations in regard to the money supply,or of the macroeconomic and microeconomic orientations concerning thedistribution of income, and so on. Matters are complicated by traditions, that is to say, by certain typesof cultural identification which link economists of different generations.Traditions may depend on the existence of certain national cultural back-grounds, on the formation of academic schools of thought, on the strength ofcertain political configurations, or on yet other causes. Thus, it is possible tospeak, for example, of an English tradition in the field of the construction ofcomprehensive grand theories, a tradition which links (despite their differenttheoretical positions) the magnificent syncretism of Smith with those ofStuart Mill and Marshall. Or, observing the thin but strong connectingthread linking Davanzati, Montanari, Galiani, Ferrara, and Pareto, it ispossible to speak of an Italian tradition in relation to the subjectivist theoryof value. It is also possible to speak of a socialist tradition regarding valueand distribution, or of a Keynesian tradition concerning economic dynamics.Traditions have an important role in guiding the scientific activity of indi-viduals and research groups. Developments in traditions intertwine withthose of the base orientations, and contribute significantly to the evolution ofeconomic thought. In certain historical periods, the orientations underlying some basictheoretical principles sometimes combine with a certain specific tradition tocontribute to the creation of a theoretical system, a general theory aspiring togive a coherent and complete answer to every problem that has arisen or canarise in a defined field of investigation. The first requirement of a theoreticalsystem is the definition of the scope of investigation. Then, it is necessary todetermine the fundamental principles around which all existing and potentialknowledge can be organized, the methodological rules that establish theway in which the research is conducted and the results evaluated, and thelinguistic canons which allow the classification, transmission, and commun-ication of knowledge. The definition of the scope of investigation is fundamental. It contains, ina nutshell, the whole development of the system, identifies the problems tobe studied, establishes which economic factors act as parameters andwhich as variables, chooses the research directions to be followed andthose to be ignored, and, finally, instructs the scientists as to what they areprohibited from doing. The fundamental principles serve to hold togetherthe parts of the theoretical system, to create a coherent and organic core
  29. 29. introduction 11doctrine, and to make it something more than a syncretic sum of diversetheories. The methodological rules instruct the scientists on how to moveacross the unknown ground of the problems to solve and of the stillunproven truths. They, perhaps more than the other dimensions of atheoretical system, and in a way that often not all the researchers areperfectly aware of, make the scientists’ choices homogeneous and theresearch results coherent. At the same time, they allow for a division oflabour which may go beyond any possible planned structures of researchactivities. Finally, the recomposition of the results of such a division of labour ismade possible by well-determined linguistic canons. Perhaps these are theleast explicitly codified characteristics of a theoretical system, but they arenot the least important. Not only do they allow the communication ofknowledge and the education of younger generations of researchers, whichmeans the creation and reproduction of the scientific community, but,above all, they delimit the field of discourse. A person who is not wellversed in the linguistic terminology used by the scientific communitysharing a particular theoretical system, that is, a person who is unable tofollow its more or less tacit rules of communication, simply does not havethe right to speak, especially when the system in question is the culturallydominant orthodoxy. The history of economic thought is full of brilliantbut unheeded self-taught men, living in the ‘underworlds’ of heretics andprecursors. In order to clarify what we mean by a ‘theoretical system’, it may be usefulto give an example. Let us consider the neoclassical system. This originatedtowards the middle of the nineteenth century and, through phases of crisesand successes, and even enduring the pressure and the centripetal forces ofthree or four great national traditions, it reached its first signs of systematicorganization towards the end of the century. Finally, and aided by thecosmopolitan push of the American neoclassical economists, it attained itssupreme synthesis towards the middle of the twentieth century. Some baseorientations typical of this system manifested themselves in a subjectivisttheory of value, a microeconomic theory of distribution, and a static theoryof equilibrium. These and other base orientations were organized around theprinciple of constrained maximization of individual objectives; while thescope of investigation was reduced to the problem of the optimal allocationof scarce resources. The basic problem for the historian of thought is: how do such systemsform? Linked to this are other, equally important questions. What determ-ines the success of a system? What causes its break up? Why in certainperiods does a ‘dictatorship’ of a certain system arise while in others thereseems to be theoretical anarchy? In the remainder of this book we have tried,within the limits set by a simple outline of the history of economic thought,
  30. 30. 12 introductionto sketch a reply to these problems. Here, we will briefly explain some of theinterpretative lines on which we have based our attempt. 1. Economic problems are strictly linked, so that a new theory concen-trating on only one problem, or on a limited group of problems, is in a certainsense unstable. Either it makes reference to an already existing theoreticalsystem and tries to become integrated into it and possibly to generalize thesystem itself, or it proposes itself as a base for the organization of a newtheoretical system. A typical example is given by the Keynesian revolution,which began by claiming to be a general theory, but was later generalized bythe system it wished to attack. The operation was accomplished by theelimination of some of the base orientations that were present in Keynes,orientations that turned out to be incompatible with neoclassical theory. Onthe other hand, and precisely by virtue of these orientations, attempts weremade to construct, on the basis of the general theory, a post-Keynesiantheoretical system conceived as an alternative to the neoclassical system. 2. The success of a theoretical system implies the realization of twoconditions, one internal and one external. The former concerns logicalcoherence, both in terms of the analytical rigour of the specific theories ofwhich a system is formed and in terms of the relationships that link onetheory to another. The latter concerns the ability of the theoretical system torespond to a certain social need. Society in certain periods of its evolutionneeds a general theory to represent it. These are periods in which order andstability predominate. The theories which are chosen must, in some way, betheories of order, equilibrium, and harmony. Therefore, not all theoreticalsystems are predisposed to prevail, even if they are coherent. Some, eventhough they are refined, rigorous, and heuristically powerful, are in any casedestined to remain at the margins of the academic world. There is anotherreason why the second condition is more important than the first: it is alwaysnecessary, while the first is not. When society needs an organic, orthodox,general theory, it finds one. If there are diverse theoretical systems availablethat satisfy the same needs, the one which best satisfies the conditions ofinternal coherence will presumably win. And when the market does not offera great deal, the best that exists is taken, even if the price of syncretism andanalytical weakness has to be paid. This was the case, for example, with theBastiat-type theories of ‘social harmony’ that prevailed in the 1850s and1860s. 3. When a society enters a period of crisis, the prestige of the dominanttheoretical system will be shaken. In a society facing a serious crisis, the needto represent the economy as an organic and ordered body is weakened; andthis occurs precisely when real problems emerge for which the generaltheories of order are unprepared. In these periods, the pressure of thescientific community on individual researchers weakens, while methodolog-ical and doctrinal ties on scientific research are loosened. In this way,
  31. 31. introduction 13creative energies are liberated. At the same time, the research interests of thescientists are attracted and shaped more by the problems emerging from thereal world than by those springing from theory. Theoretical revolutionsoccur in these periods. They are characterized by confusion of language;but in such a confusion the bases are laid down for the construction ofnew theoretical systems. However, it could also happen that old systems arerevitalised. A theoretical system which enters a period of crisis does not neces-sarily leave the scene. The crisis itself may even contribute to the system’sregeneration, a typical example being the resurgence of the neoclassicalsystem after the crisis of the 1920s and 1930s. 4. Although the history of economic thought cannot be interpreted simplyin terms of the growth of knowledge, there are, however, certain forms ofprogress. One type of evolution is that which occurs within a particular baseorientation. As an orientation refers to a specific problem, evolution consistsin the progressive refinement of the theory accounting for the phenomenon.In this way, the objectivist theory of value progressed as it moved fromRicardo to Marx and thence to Sraffa. On the other hand, two differentorientations focusing on the same problem are not comparable, as they arederived from different pre-analytical premisses. In regard to the problem ofthe distribution of income, for example, there is an orientation, founded onthe presupposition that an economy is a set of exchange relationships amongindividuals, which tends to reduce the problem to that of the determination ofthe prices of the productive services. There is, however, another orientation,one based on the premiss that the economy is a system of functional and/orconflictual relations among social classes, which considers the distributiveproblem as that of dividing the national product among the classes. Now,whether one of these two orientations is able to explain a historical realitybetter than the other is not a question that can be resolved on the analyticallevel: the acceptance of one or other of the presuppositions on which theorientations are based implies a pre-analytical choice. For this reason, thetransfer of hegemony from a theory that proposes a certain orientation toone that proposes a different orientation cannot be evaluated in terms ofprogress. There is a second type of evolution, one which concerns theoreticalsystems. Here, in addition to the progress involving each of the individualcomponents of the system, there is also progress in the overall organizationof the components. In this case, progress occurs through the substitution of aspecific theory by another, if the new theory integrates better with the rest ofthe theories making up the system. Another type of progress of a systemconcerns the internal substitution of partial theories by general theories. Yetanother consists of the integration, in the system, of theories relating to newproblems. This can happen either because the empirical research activated bythe system itself leads to the discovery of new phenomena or because thesystem manages to focus on, and to provide solutions to, problems that haveemerged in an autonomous way. Thus, the progress of a system, even if it
  32. 32. 14 introductionpasses through scientific revolutions, in the end always comes down to aprocess of analytical refinement and/or theoretical generalization. However,we are only dealing with progress of a system. Also, in this case it isimpossible to compare different theoretical systems in terms of progress. Thisis both due to the incommensurability of the base orientations from whichthe different systems develop and because different systems define the veryscope of investigation, and the problems to which they are applied, in dif-ferent terms.From the above, it will be easy to understand the methodological position wehave adopted in this book. Our outline of the history of economic thought isneither a history of illustrious personalities nor one of economic themes.Rather, it takes a history-of-ideas approach, whose principal aims consist,on the one hand, of understanding the context in which the ideas are formedand, on the other, of explaining how the fundamental ideas lead to thecreation of particular theoretical systems. BibliographyOn the ‘absolutist’ approach: M. Blaug, Economic Theory in Retrospect (London,1964); ‘Was there a Marginal Revolution?’, in R. D. G. Black, C. D. W. Goodwin(eds.), The Marginal Revolution in Economics (Durham, 1973); J. E. Cairnes, Essayson Political Economy (London 1873, reprint New York, 1965); F. Ferrara, Esamestorico-critico di economisti e dottrine economiche, 4 vols., (Turin, 1889); D. F. Gordon,‘The Role of the History of Economic Thought in the Understanding of ModernEconomic Theory’, American Economic Review, Papers and Proceedings (1965);F. H. Knight, On the History and Method of Economics (Chicago, 1956);M. Pantaleoni, Scritti varii di economia (Milan, 1904); J.-B. Say, Cours completd’economie politique pratique (Paris, 1840); G. J. Stigler, ‘The Influence of Events and ´Policies on Economic Theory’, American Economic Review, Papers and Proceedings(1960). On the applications of Kuhn’s and Lakatos’s theories: M. Blaug, ‘Kuhn versusLakatos or Paradigms versus Research Programmes in the History of Economics’, inLatsis (1976); M. Bronfenbrenner, ‘The ‘‘Structure of Revolutions’’ in EconomicThought’, History of Political Economy (1971); A. W. Coats, ‘Is There a Structureof Scientific Revolutions in Economics?’, Kyklos, (1969); R. Fisher, The Logic ofEconomic Discovery, (Brighton, 1986); T. W. Hutchison, ‘On the History andPhilosophy of Science and Economics’, in Latsis (1976); L. Kunin, S.-F. Weaver, ‘Onthe Structure of Scientific Revolutions in Economics’, History of Political Economy,(1971); S. J. Latsis (ed.), Method and Appraisal in Economics (Cambridge, 1976);E. R. Weintraub, General Equilibrium Analysis (Cambridge, 1985). On the ‘relativist’ approaches: M. Bronfenbrenner, ‘Trends, Cycles, and Fads inEconomic Writing’, American Economic Review (1966); A. K. Dasgupta, Epochs of
  33. 33. introduction 15Economic Theory (Oxford, 1985); J. Hicks, ‘ ‘‘Revolutions’’ in Economics’, in Latsis(1976); S. Karsten, ‘Dialectics and the Evolution of Economic Thought’, Historyof Political Economy, (1973); J. E. King, Economic Exiles, (London, 1988);W. C. Mitchell, Types of Economic Theory (New York, 1969); G. Myrdal, ‘Crises andCycles in the Development of Economics’, The Political Quarterly (1973); L. Nabers,The Positive and Genetic Approaches, in S. R. Krupp (ed.), The Structure of EconomicScience (Englewood Cliffs, 1966); F. Neumark, ‘Zyklen in der Geschichteokonomischen Idee’, Kyklos (1975); L. Rogin, The Meaning and Validity of Economic¨Theory (New York, 1956); E. Roll, A History of Economic Thought, 2nd edn.(London, 1946); J. A. Schumpeter, History of Economic Analysis (New York, 1954);G. L. S. Shackle, The Years of High Theory (Cambridge, 1967); W. Stark, The Historyof Economics in its Relation to Social Development (London 1944); ‘The ‘‘ClassicalSituation’’ in Political Economy’, Kyklos (1959). Some recent contributions: R. Backhouse, A History of Modern Economic Analysis(Oxford, 1985); M. Beaud and G. Dostaler, Economic Thought Since Keynes:A History and Dictionary of Major Economists (London, 1995); N. Bellanca andM. Guidi, ‘Uchronics and the History of Economic Knowledge’, The EuropeanJournal of the History of Economic Thought (1997); R. Dehem, Histoire de la pensee ´economique (Quebec, 1984); P. Groenewegen and G. Vaggi, Il pensiero economico:´Dal mercantilismo al monetarismo (Rome, 2002); B. Ingrao and F. Ranchetti,Il mercato nel pensiero economico: Storia e analisi di un’idea dall’illuminismo alla teoriadei giochi (Milan, 1996); H. Landreth and D. C. Colander, History of EconomicThought (1996); F. Modigliani, ‘The Monetarist Controversy, or Should We ForsakeStabilisation Policy?’ American Economic Review (1977); E. Screpanti, ‘Cicli,rivoluzioni e situazioni classiche nello sviluppo delle idee economiche’, Economiapolitica, (1988); W. K. Tabb, Reconstructing Political Economy: The Great Divide inEconomic Thought (London, 1999); J. Tobin, ‘Is Friedman a Monetarist?’, in J. Stein(ed.), Monetarism (Amsterdam, 1976).
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  35. 35. PART IFrom the Origins to Keynes
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  37. 37. 1 The Birth of Political Economy 1.1. Opening of the Modern World1.1.1. The end of the Middle Ages and scholasticismThe feudal economy rose from the ashes of the slave economy of the RomanEmpire. The relationship between owner and slave, a relationship that is onlypossible if the slave can produce more than he consumes, was transformedinto one between owner and serf. The serf was tied to the land he cultivatedand received protection from the lord in return for certain economic andpolitical services. The ultimate control of economic activity was in the handsof the king, who could, in most cases, transfer the feuds from one lord toanother. Land and labour were transferred rather than bought and sold; andthis meant that there was no need for labour and land markets. Authority,faith, and tradition were enough to guarantee that the system worked well. The relative economic security created by the feudal institutions con-tributed to an improvement in the living conditions of the population, if forno other reason than that the social condition of the serf was higher than thatof the slave. At the same time, the formation of cities in densely populatedareas and the widespread diffusion of craft workshops laid the ground forthe beginnings of intense commercial activity. The figure of the independentmerchant appeared, initially, in the gaps in and at the edges of the traditionaleconomy and, later, in a new economic sphere: the free city and its markets;the seeds of the modern European city. The growth of the city economies and of the commercial and financialtraffic of the urban bourgeoisie began in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.It was in this period that the first serious attempts at economic theorizingstarted. Before this there were just a few interesting ideas: Aristotle’s theoriesof ‘natural chrematistics’, that is, the art of becoming rich by producinggoods and services useful to life, and of ‘unnatural chrematistics’, whichconcerns enrichment from trade and usury; his distinction between the usevalue and the exchange value of goods, the former consisting of the ability ofa good to satisfy a specific need and the latter of the quantitative relationshipin which one good is exchanged for another; and his attempt to define the‘just price’ of goods on the basis of the equivalence of the values exchanged. The scholastic philosophy of the thirteenth century, whose principalexponent was Thomas Aquinas, was explicitly linked to Aristotelian philo-sophy and heavily marked by the attempt to assimilate it into Christianity.
  38. 38. 20 the birth of political economyIts crucial assumption was that human intelligence is able to reach the truthby means of the speculative method. There are three orders of truth to whichspeculation should be turned: divine law, as manifested in the revelation;natural law ( jus naturalis), as embodied in the ‘universals’ which God hadgiven to the creatures; and positive law, produced by human choices andconventions and valid for all of mankind ( jus gentium) or for the subjects ofthe single states ( jus civilis). The majority of the economic propositions ofscholasticism come under positive law and only a few under natural law. Thetheory of the ‘just price’, reduced to the communis aestimatio (commonevaluation) of the normal price in the absence of monopoly, was derivedfrom Aristotle. There was also a theory of the ‘just wage’, which was defined,again according to the communis aestimatio principle, as the wage whichwould guarantee the worker a standard of living adequate to his socialcondition. In connection with this, there were also signs of a just price theorywhich, by virtue of the principle of ‘exchange of equivalents’, was connectedto the cost of production and, therefore, mainly to the cost of labour. A profitis included in the cost of production, but it must be fair and moderate, anhonestus quaestus, an honourable earning, just enough for the merchant tolook after his family and devote a little money to charity. Thus, taking intoaccount the fact that commerce was only considered legitimate if it wasuseful to the collectivity, it is difficult to see little more than the notion ofa wage for direction in the scholastic concept of profit. The just price is an intrinsic property of a good, as it expresses its intrinsicvalue (bonitas intrinseca), But how this value is determined is not clear. Theprevailing opinions oscillate between the theory of the efforts sustained inproduction and that of the capability of the good to satisfy a human need. Inboth cases, however, we are dealing with an objective property of the good.And it is not clear whether the propositions concerning the value of thegoods are of natural law, as suggested by the theory of the bonitas intrinseca,or should be reduced to the positive law, as the theory of communis aes-timatio seems to suggest. In fact, the scholasticists were not really interestedin understanding what value is or how it is determined. They believed thatthe just price must be such as to guarantee commutative justice, that is, equalexchange, in such a way that nobody can obtain more than he gives from theexchange of goods. If this price is ‘just’ because it corresponds to the naturallaw, it is also true—and, in a certain sense, even truer than the prices at whichthe goods are really exchanged on the market, which can be a little higher orlower than the ‘just’ price itself. This is probably the distant origin of theclassical theories of natural and market prices, which will be considered inChapter 2. Unlike real goods, which have an intrinsic value, money has a conventionalvalue (impositus), a value imposed by the prince, and there is no doubt thatthe doctrine of the value of money comes within positive rather than naturallaw. At any rate, a conventionalist theory of money predominates in
  39. 39. the birth of political economy 21scholastic thought, and especially in the work of Thomas Aquinas, whoconsidered money as a standard invented by man to measure the value ofgoods and facilitate trade. Money was also considered as a replaceable goodwhich is consumed in use. In fact, the main justification for the condem-nation of usury was derived from this. Non-fungible goods were those thatcould be used without being destroyed. They roughly corresponded to whatwe would now call ‘durable goods’. Fungible goods, on the other hand, wereobjects destroyed through use, as for example, wine. In the first case, use canbe separated from ownership so that one can be sold independently of theother. This is not so in the latter case. Money came into the fungible goodscategory: when used to buy goods it is lost. Anyone lending it is entitled to itsrestitution, but cannot expect to receive a price for its use, for that would beusury. The debtor should in fact return it intact. Even a low rate of interestwas taken as usury, since anything added to loaned capital was consideredsuch. Thomas Aquinas took up the Aristotelian condemnation of usury andadded to it a theory according to which money, as it is not a durable goodwhich produces services, like capital goods, cannot be rented out, so that itslending cannot give the right to the collection of interest. He was againstthose who maintained that interest, being proportional to the duration of theloan, is produced by time, an opinion that he attacked by arguing that time isa common good. It is God’s gift to mankind, and nobody has the right toappropriate it for himself or to appropriate its fruits. The ban on usury waspartly overcome by applying the damnum emergens doctrine, i.e. the viewthat interest compensates for the risk run by the lender of losing part of hiscapital ( periculum sortis). Compensation was generally granted for this riskwhen there was a delay in returning credit, precisely because the delay couldgive rise to losses. Default interest was therefore admitted. In these cases,compensation was considered to be ‘interest’, not ‘usury’. It was acceptableto expect a premium for damnum et interesse. Usury was prohibited, defaultinterest was not. Some authors also made allowances for missing profit; thisis what today is known as ‘opportunity cost’ in loan granting. Supporters ofthe legitimacy of compensation for ‘missing profit’ held that interest mustcompensate for the profits renounced by the lender, since his money is notemployed for alternative uses. Many canonists maintained however thatmoney put to alternative uses should not generate a profit anyway, and that itwas therefore right to condemn usury, nullifying remuneration of all mon-etary uses of capital. A loan should not entitle the lender to compensation formissing profit. Finally, Aquinas made an interesting attempt to justify private property,an attempt that seems to be the first link in the long chain which, as we willsee, connects scholastic thought to the seventeenth-century natural-lawphilosophy and to nineteenth-century socialism. God created the earth forthe whole of mankind, and nobody can claim a right which deprives othermen of the goods created. Private property, however, could be justified as
  40. 40. 22 the birth of political economya stimulus to work and is not in contrast with natural law, even thoughit is not established by it. It can be seen as a form of concession that thecommunity gives to individuals, provided they use it as a service to thecommunity: it is not a right of using, enjoying, and abusing ( jus utendi,fruendi, et abutendi), but only a power of procuring and dispensing ( potestasprocurandi ac dispensandi). It is not difficult to understand the strong moralist tone of the scholastictheories and their normative function. This was a period in which the revivalof commerce threatened to break up a social order which was supposed to bebased on the divine will, while bringing wealth and welfare, if not to all thecommunity, certainly to some new classes and social groups. In this situationthere was a strongly felt need to keep under the community’s control,wherever possible, the economic instruments by which the new wealth wasaccumulated: commercial profits, prices, usury loans, and private property. The economic ideas of Aquinas, and of scholasticism in general, havemoral implications rather than scientific, and belong to the prehistory ofeconomic science. But they cannot be ignored in any history of this scienceas, after becoming part of the social doctrine of the Catholic Church, theyhave continued to influence economic thought for several centuries, even inwriters who did not agree with them. Economists who have elaboratedopposing doctrines have had to take them into consideration. An excellentexample is the abbe Galiani, who, as late as the eighteenth century, at the ´height of the Enlightenment, was not able to formulate his own moderntheory of interest without feeling the need to show its coherence with thedoctrine of ‘commutative’ justice and the precept that prohibits usury.1.1.2. Communes, humanism and the RenaissanceFrom the end of the twelfth century onwards, European society and eco-nomy underwent a process of transformation which continued until aroundthe middle of the sixteenth century. It began in Italy and already in thethirteenth century it had spread and became firmly established in otherregions, Flanders, England, northern Germany and southern France. A newform of social organization developed: town civilization. In a typical town ofthe late Middle Ages, or, better still, Renaissance period, citizens were free tomove around and meet up in different places: in churches, the governmentpalace, the merchant’s court, the guildhalls, the buildings of confraternitiesand those of the trainbands, the marketplace, the palaces of the wealthybourgeoisie; particularly in the streets which provided the backdrop fortrading and social conflict, and lastly, in the main square, the venue for thepeople’s political assembly, or ‘Parliament’, where public decisions weretaken, often resorting to the argument of weapons. This civil revival came as the result of a long economic and socialrevolution. At economic level, manufacturing, commercial and financial
  41. 41. the birth of political economy 23capitalism developed. In the textiles sector, in particular, where importanttechnological innovations, such as the wide loom, had been introduced,production grew to such an extent that extensive ‘workshops’ were built forthe great number of wage-workers which often ran into hundreds. Moreover,the invention of the mechanical clock enabled time to be measured accur-ately and consequently wage-workers to be used more efficiently. Trading,on continental scale, embraced the whole of Europe and the Mediterranean.Finance and international banking developed to such an extent that bankersfrequently conditioned diplomacy and wars between great powers. Duringthis period several important economic innovations were introduced: the billof exchange, double entry accounting, securitazation of the public debt,insurance, the merchants’ forum, the bank, the stock exchange and thecommenda—the forerunner of today’s joint stock company. At social level, the rise of the bourgeoisie during a long revolutionaryprocess led to the armed ‘people’ undermining the power of the old aristo-cratic classes, while Communes were set up as autonomous states, inde-pendent of imperial rule. Already around the end of the thirteenth century,serfdom had been abolished in many of the Italian republics to smite thearistocracy’s economic power and release labour to import to the city, butalso in deference to a new concept of human freedom. It was during thisperiod that the modern idea of freedom developed, intended as ‘freedom ofthe people’, that is, autonomy of the people set up as a Commune against theprerogatives of imperial power, on the one hand, and ‘individual freedom’,that is, the right to take autonomous decisions about one’s life in economic,political, and moral fields, on the other. But most important of all was perhaps the cultural revolution, which saw arevival of the arts, architecture, literature, philosophy, and law. Humanismrepresented the unifying spirit of the entire process. The rediscovery of Greekand Roman literary and philosophical works enabled the intellectuals of thetimes to take a step back ahead of the Middle Ages and lay the foundationsfor a jump forward to modern times, to what has been called ‘civil human-ism’. The rediscovery of ancient juridical works, on the other hand, led to theconstitution of Corpus iuris civilis and the birth of studies in Roman law,creating the premisses for overriding feudal and canon law and the birth ofan advanced law more in keeping with capitalist development. And whilein public law, the concept of a constitutional state with popular sovereigntybegan to take shape under the guidance of Marsilio da Padova, in privatelaw a form of regulation of the employment relationship emerged, which byrestoring the concept of locatio operarum, led to the end of feudal disciple-ship and the birth of the modern employment contract. The hero of humanism is an active subject, open to innovation, a lover offreedom who is proud of his civil virtues: in short a merchant-manufacturer.This new Hercules combined action and reflection, art and accountancy,religion and politics, theory and practice, in the immense effort to create

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