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  • 1. The endless opportunities and challenges of developing public access Indigenous knowledge information systems Peter Radoll, Director, Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre, Australian National University
  • 2. Why are we storing Indigenous knowledge?
    • economic, environment and social benefits
    • storing this information for retrieval
    • but for who?
    • ensure it doesn’t prevent modernity
  • 3. Who decides on what Indigenous knowledge will be stored?
    • probably best left up to those who own the knowledge or those who are custodians of the knowledge
  • 4. Storing sensitive materials
    • Men’s and Women’s business
    • Who stores the information?
  • 5. What is public access: who decides who gets access to what?
    • public access can mean many different things to many people
    • Who can access evidence to support Native Title claims?
  • 6. Are copyrights protected online or in a virtual environment?
    • The Australian Copyright Act, 1968 (Cth) is a set of statutory rights that an artist automatically receives. It exists immediately and stays with the artist for their lifetime plus fifty years after their death, providing the work is original and is reduced to material form ( Copyright Act ( Cth )).
  • 7. Are copyrights protected online or in a virtual environment?
    • people have thought of Aboriginal art as "a kind of artistic 'terra nullius' - “theirs for the taking“
    • Most Aboriginal material is considered in this manner
    • Moreover, digitised material is considered free on the Internet
  • 8. Are copyrights protected online or in a virtual environment?
  • 9. Limitation of technology to cope with Indigenous governance structures http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/cgns/adf/library.html
  • 10. Limitation of technology to cope with Indigenous governance structures http://facilities.anu.edu.au/index.php?pid=1139
  • 11. Limitation of technology to cope with Indigenous governance structures Margaret Harnagold, http://content.cqu.edu.au/FCWViewer/view.do?page=5894
  • 12. Summing up
    • Many economic, environment and social benefits
    • Be ethical, don’t store knowledge to prevent modernity
    • Remember copyrights exists in virtual environments
    • Governance structures and Aboriginal Communities considerations
  • 13.
    • Question?
    Peter Radoll Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre Australian National University [email_address]