In defense of cyberwar
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In defense of cyberwar

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  • Photo credit: Fazard Bishop collection
  • The unconfirmed report is from NHK quoting unnamed South Korean intelligence officialsPhoto Credit: digital globe
  • Photo credit: http://csis.org/files/publication/120906_Iran_US_Preventive_Strikes.pdfhttp://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/20/world/middleeast/united-states-war-game-sees-dire-results-of-an-israeli-attack-on-iran.html?pagewanted=all

In defense of cyberwar Presentation Transcript

  • 1. In Defense of CyberwarWhy digital warfare is a good thing
  • 2. A brief history of nuclear weapon prevention1979: Saddam Hussein beginsbuilding a nuclear reactor withthe help of the French1980: During the Iran-Iraqwar, Iran tries to bomb thereactor. Minimal damage. Nocasualties.1981: Israel bombs thereactor, destroying it. 11People are killed (10 Iraqisoldiers, 1 French civilian)
  • 3. A brief history of nuclear weapon preventionEarly 2000s: Syria beginsbuilding a nuclear reactor withhelp from North Korea.2007: Israel destroy thereactor. Unconfirmed reportsstate that 10 North Koreanswere killed.
  • 4. A brief history of nuclear weapon preventionIran’s nuclear program:• Dispersed• Underground• Protected The Natanz Nuclear site: Under 30 feet of reinforced concrete
  • 5. A brief history of nuclear weapon preventionAn attack on Iran would bedifficult, and likely cost manymore lives than the previoustwo examples.Attack would takehundreds of planes, shipsand missiles- CSISA government simulationof an Israeli attack led to200 dead Americans andfull scale Americaninvolvement.
  • 6. A brief history of nuclear weapon prevention2008: Operation OlympicGames• Stuxnet• Duqu• Flame• Any Others?Targeted at destroying Iran’snuclear capability.
  • 7. What makes Stuxnet unique? Stuxnet SQL SlammerTarget Very specific EveryoneBreadth of damage Narrow WidespreadDepth of damage Physical Internet only, minor secondary effectsCost to develop Very high ModerateComplexity Very high ModerateTime to detection Years Hours
  • 8. Weaponizing SQL slammer is MAD• MAD = Mutually Assured Destruction. It’s what kept the USSR and the USA from starting a nuclear war for several decades.• Creating a worm that destroyed the internet would likely hurt the originator as much as the recipient.
  • 9. Weaponizing SQL slammer is MAD• How many parasites destroy their entire ecosystem?
  • 10. Cyberweapons ageExploit for sale!• Full root, 100% of the time• Windows machines• No patches available• Can be launched remotely• “Point and click” simplicity• Bypasses all AV, firewalls, and can even traverse NAT• How much is this worth?
  • 11. Cyberweapons ageRT-2PM Topol AK-47First deployed by the USSR,1988. Still in use.
  • 12. Yes, we are vulnerable tooDo you really think refraining from useof cyber weapons will stop others formdoing the same?
  • 13. Yes, we are vulnerable too Which would you rather face?
  • 14. The law is always playing catchupThere are currently nointernational conventions,treaties, standards, etc…..They always come afterthe weapon is used –policymakers have a hardtime acting in a vacuum.
  • 15. In the future, I hope we use and areconfronted by digital weapons and notkinetic onesAri Elias-Bachrachari@defensium.com@angelofsecuritywww.defensium.com