Venice Italy Design Competition
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Venice Italy Design Competition

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An architectural design entry for the 2008 Venice Biennale Australian Pavilion.

An architectural design entry for the 2008 Venice Biennale Australian Pavilion.

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Venice Italy Design Competition Venice Italy Design Competition Document Transcript

  • A U S T R A L I A N PAV I L I O N VE N IC E BI E N NA LE 200 8 ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION JOURNAL
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  • Final Version of the Australian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 3
  • This new Australian Pavilion expresses a balance between what is in danger of being lost through the rigors of time with what will eventually emerge to replace it. 4
  • Built on massive stone foundations that appear to sink into the shi ing ground, the symbolism is of the Venice we have come to expect as inevitable: the Beautiful Sinking City... but revived by optimism and bluster. The early studies of the form began as an exploration into the architectural expression of “new growth”. The massive foundations were purposely created as imperfect blocks skewed awkwardly into the ground. The roof planes were light and weightless forms carried by a structural system that mimicked the large trees abundant throughout the Gardens. A somewhat rigid geometry played off the sharp angles of the stone pylons. As the design emerged, refinements to the roof to be er enclose and protect the gallery led inevitably to a compromise in the symbolic nature of the form. Too bad it rains in Venice. To properly display art, and to allow the most flexibility in the presentation of a wide variety of venues, the gallery became a more conventional enclosed space. A second floor plaza was added for a sculpture garden or to function as a cafe or other mixed uses. A translucent fabric roof was proposed, then replaced with a more substantial metal roof. This upper roof was always seen as an expression of a lightweight organic treeline. 5
  • The multi-faceted nature of the roof structure invites the sun and allows its light to wander into the space, casting diffuse and complex shadows throughout the volume. This roof took many forms as it was developed. Its final configuration is constructed as lightweight metal panels held in suspension by a discrete la ice of cables and delicate hooped trusses. A crossing transept roof is introduced to accentuate the exterior vertical access and to provide a sculptural clearstory to the roo op garden. The rhythm of the structure is interrupted by occasional non-sequiturs that strike subtle discordant notes into the form without dispelling its unifying harmony. 6
  • With the structure naturally leaning toward and overhanging the water, it was a simple leap of design to add a sculptural pedestrian bridge. 7
  • GENERAL SITE VICINITY STORAGE 22 m2 GALLERY LEVEL PLAN The facility incorporates a large walk through Gallery Shop that leads directly to the Great Hall. This large gallery also houses two smaller Alcoves that serve as adjunct spaces or meeting rooms. The Great Hall also provides a direct connection to the Canal. Vertical access to the Upper Gallery is provided by flanking exterior stairways and an elevator. ALCOVE 1 25 m2 EXISTING PAVILION TO BE RELOCATED FRANCE EXISTING AUSTRALIAN PAVILION NEW AUSTRALIAN PAVILION 8
  • ENTRY SHOP & BOOKSTORE 75 m2 OFFICES 32 m2 ELEV MAIN GALLERY 330 m2 ALCOVE 2 25 m2 9
  • TREETOP GALLERY PLAN A large open-air gallery space is housed on the roo op. It is covered by the sculptural lightweight roof and features an artful pedestrian bridge that links the facility to the opposite side of the Canal. This upper level also hosts a seasonal café & coffee shop and also can serve as a partially enclosed facility for private parties, fund-raisers or other gatherings. It offers a glorious view of the small vessels that traverse along the Rio del Giardini. RESTROOM Pedestrian Bridge Connection 10
  • STORAGE & CATERING KITCHEN ROOFTOP GALLERY ELEV 270 m2 11
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  • BRIEF FOR THE PROPOSED NEW VENICE BIENNALE AUSTRALIAN PAVILION SITE The Biennale is one of the world’s most prestigious cultural events. It was first held in 1895 and now Assume reusing the existing site of the Australian incorporates art, architecture, cinema, dance, music Pavilion in the Giardini, or as an option, entrants may and theatre. The main locations are the Giardini choose to select a completely different site in Venice. and the Arsenale. AUSTRALIA AT THE VENICE BIENNALE BRIEF A pavilion for the exhibition and presentation of Australia has been involved with the Art Bienalle since Australia’s contributions to the Venice Arts Biennale 1954, and with the Architecture Biennale since 2000. (52nd held 2007), and Venice Architects Biennale Aaron Betsky is the curator of the upcoming biennale (10th held 2006). Exhibitions may be static, mobile, “Out There. Architecture Beyond Building”. theatre, visual, sound/music, 3D constructions and video. The team curating the Australian exhibition are Kerstin Thompson, Wendy Lewin, Neil Durbach, Vince Frost SPACE ANALYSIS and Gary Warner. Assume total 500 square metres floor area: Entry and books – 10 sqM.Main hall – 400 sqM. THE CURRENT AUSTRALIAN PAVILION Meeting room/s + second gallery – 30 sqM. Offices + staff facilities – 30 sqM. The current Australian Pavilion was designed by Storage, plant, back-of-house – 30 sqM. Sydney architect Philip Cox and opened in 1988. There was pressure at the time to build quickly or SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS lose the opportunity to the last position available in The date of submission is Tuesday 22 April 2008 the Giardini della Biennale. It was prefabricated, and by 5pm. No entries submitted after this time will be within a month of the planning permit being issued it accepted. was open for the Arthur Boyd exhibition. The pavilion was always viewed as temporary. It has long been DI STASIO COMPETITION criticised as being a very difficult space to curate. C/O 147 Chapel Street St Kilda VIC 3182, Australia VENICE Venice has a dual nature. Water and buildings. The large open piazzas and tight-winding calle. The city with a wafer-thin façade behind which lurks death and decay. The hard stone streets and the lush private gardens. A glimpse through a half open door reveals a private world. The pedestrian nature of the city forces you to physically interact with it, every single step of your journey. The architecture provides a backdrop to Venetian life and this is captured in cinema ranging from Iain Softley’s adaptation of Henry James’s novel “Wing’s of the Dove”, Lucino Visconti’s adaptation of Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice” to action and adventure such as Indiana Jones, Lara Croft and James Bond. For centuries the city has been congested with tourists all seeking this mythical “Venice” during summer, and an empty theatre in winter. It was the decadent playground of Europe, which inspired artists, musicians, writers, architects and romantics. 15
  • ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION JOURNAL The Venice Biennale concept and all presentation materials are the creation of California Architect Steven Alden steve@studiomail.us SaldenStudio.com