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  • They diagnosed her with a bunch of different things but never said ovarian cancer. By the time they found it it was on stage four and too late. My mom was diagnosed of stage IV ovarian cancer in August of 2005. The doctors gave her two to three years to live. There was no way to treat her cancer because it had already spread throughout her body. Even though chemo wouldn’t work she decided to do it anyway. She had chemo twice before she decided to stop because it was only making her more sick. Instead of living for two years she lived for 3 months. My mom passed away on October 3rd of that same year.\n
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  • I am going to ask a series of true and false question about ovarian cancer. The students will call out what they think and then I will give them the correct answer. \n
  • - Ovaries are found on both sides of the pelvis\n- eggs are stored in the ovaries \n- the eggs are used for fertilization \n\n\n
  • Cancer is when a cells grows abnormally \nOvarian cancer is just the growth of abnormal cells in the ovaries\nOvarian cancer could be found in other parts of the body but are still known as ovarian cancer because they originated in the ovary \n
  • NOT an Automatic death sentence\nand cannot be passed from one person to another\n
  • benign tumors are not cancerous, they cannot spread to other parts of the body but should be removed in the case of ovarian cancer\n
  • cancerous and should be worried about\nthey grow by invading near by cells\nthey also spread through the body through a process called metastasis which is where cells break off of the tumor and enter the blood stream\n\n\n\n
  • arise from tumors that produce eggs, most diagnosed in young women\n20% of all ovarian tumors,\n3% are malignant\nIn 90% of cases it involves only ovaries \n\n
  • it is ovarian cancer that arises from the surrounding connective tissue of the ovary\nit makes up about 5% of ovarian tumors\n\n
  • most common in women before menopause\nbut can also happen after\nSimple- thin walled and contains fluid, are common and occur dring egg formation or ovulation\nComplex- determined by the walls within the cyst\nleading to rooms in the cyst\ndifferent appearances \nappearance of the bud in the cyst cavity\ndifferent thickness within the surrounding walls\ncomplex cysts are a huge concern \ncan be cancer- mostly after menopause\ncan also be vascular which can also lead to cancer\n
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  • family history of ovarian cancer\nover the age of 50\nover the age of 35 but have never had kids\njewish decent\ncaucasians are at a higher risk \nLate menopause\nPersonal history or breast cancer\nHaving first child after the age of 30\nStarting menstruation before the age of 12\nHormone replacement therapy \n\n\n
  • swollen or bloated in lower abdomen\nlose of appetite\nweight loss or gain\nfeeling tired more frequently \nleg pains \nurinating more frequently \nShortness of breathe \nVaginal Bleeding (off course of menstruation)\nDiarrhea or constipation\nGas, indigestion, nausea \nLower back pain\nPressure on abdomen\nPain during intercourse \n
  • the first way to diagnose ovarian cancer is to do an ultrasound\nultra sounds help find out if the person has cancer and possibly how bad the cancer is\n\n
  • just like an ultra sound except they go inside of you to do the testing- makes ultrasounds, in this case, more accurate\n\n
  • CA-125 is a protein found in cancerous cells.\nthis test analyses the the disease’s process and tumor response for when the patient has to start treatment \n
  • cancer is only in the ovaries \n\n
  • Cancer is now in other pelvic organs\n\n
  • cancer is now on abdominal surfaces, lymph nodes and intestinal surfaces\n\n
  • cancer has now spread to any part of the body\n
  • stage IV ovarian cancer can spread to anywhere in the body\n
  • traveling through the cleaning system\n\n
  • breaking off of the cancer cells and attaching to other surrounding tissues\n
  • passing through the blood system\nparts of tissue can break off and travel through the blood system and reattach to other parts of the body\n\n
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  • most common treatment, it helps stage cancer, and it is to remove tumors \n\n
  • chemotherapy is a taxane-platinum combination\nplatinum is the most active towards cancer\nWorks by creating breaks into DNA which leads to cell death\nGiven by vain or directly into the abdomen\ntaxane- blocks microtubules- which are a part of cell division \n\n\n
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Transcript

  • 1. Angela Rizzitiello Ms. Rieger Period 4/5 English CPhttp://womensvoicesforchange.org/tag/disease-that-whispers
  • 2. ThesisOvarian cancer is degenerated reproductive disease that hasnot only affected me but has affected many others. Throughmy application I raise awareness about “The Silent Killer.”
  • 3. Personal Relevance
  • 4. "Life is not the way its supposed tobe. Its the way it is. The way youcope with it is what makes thedifference."~ Virginia Satir
  • 5. Mini ActivityTrue/False
  • 6. Ovaries Produce eggs Produce female hormonesDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006
  • 7. Ovarian Cancer growth of abnormal cells in the ovaries which keep dividinghttp://www.riversideonline.com/health_reference/Test-Procedure/MY00554.cfmDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006
  • 8. Ovarian Cancer is NOT!http://www.flickr.com/photos/batega/1865482908/http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:No_death.svg Dizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006
  • 9. Benign Tumorhttp://www.web-books.com/eLibrary/ON/B0/B9/09MB9.htmlDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006
  • 10. Malignant Tumorshttp://trendsupdates.com/north-american-researchers-isolate-metastasis-inhibitor/ Freedman, Jeri. Ovarian Cancer. New York: n.p., 2009. Print. This book is different from “100 Questions and Answers about Ovarian Cancer
  • 11. Germ Cell Tumors(http://www.carenewengland.org/body.cfm?id=170&chunkiid=11638)Freedman, Jeri. Ovarian Cancer. New York: n.p., 2009. Print. This book is different from “100 Questions and Answers about Ovarian Cancer
  • 12. Sex Cord-Stromal Tumorhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/euthman/2163477587/
  • 13. Ovarian Cystshttp://www.medicaltourismco.com/oncology/ovarian-cancer-treatment-abroad.php
  • 14. CausesNO KNOWN CAUSES
  • 15. Risk Factors
  • 16. Symptomshttp://www.cdc.gov/cancer/ovarian/basic_info/symptoms.htmhttp://day2day-morningcoffee.blogspot.com/2011/01/dr-ozs-silent-cancer-checklist.html
  • 17. Diagnosis(http://www.ivf-infertility.com/infertility/pcos.php)Guernsey, Diane. “The Silent Killer.” eLibrary. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2010.
  • 18. Inter-vaginal UltrasoundGuernsey, Diane. “The Silent Killer.” eLibrary. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2010.http://www.healthbanks.com/PatientPortal/MyPractice.aspx?UAID=%7BE5E68F03-CDA2-42EF-A187-2D509BEF8EA3%7D&ID=HW5ncicdr0000258010
  • 19. CA-125 Blood TestGuernsey, Diane. “The Silent Killer.” eLibrary. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2010.http://www.asktheazduiattorney.com/?tag=blood-test
  • 20. Stage IDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006(http://cancerpictures.wordpress.com/2009/12/22/ovarian-cancer-stages/)
  • 21. Stage IIDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006(http://cancerpictures.wordpress.com/2009/12/22/ovarian-cancer-stages/)
  • 22. Stage IIIDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006(http://cancerpictures.wordpress.com/2009/12/22/ovarian-cancer-stages/)
  • 23. Stage IVDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006(http://cancerpictures.wordpress.com/2009/12/22/ovarian-cancer-stages/)
  • 24. Stage IV Cancer can spread anywhere in the bodyhttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/9627.htm
  • 25. Spreading ()http://allhealthcare.monster.com/news/articles/2909-scientists-ready-new-nanobots-to-swim-in-human-blood-stream
  • 26. Tissuehttp://health.allrefer.com/health/lymph-system-lymphatic-system-1.html
  • 27. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/medical/IM03917
  • 28. Preventionremoval of ovariesHaving multiple childrenbreast feedingbirth control
  • 29. Treatments Surgery(http://www.ovarian-cancer-facts.com/ovarian-cancer-surgery.html)
  • 30. Chemotherapy(http://www.cancertreatment-wecareindia.com/ovarian_cancer/chemotherapy_for_ovarian_cancer.html)
  • 31. Radiationhttp://www.metrohealth.org/body.cfm?id=1637
  • 32. Nancy Quinn
  • 33. “Being deeply loved bysomeone gives youstrength, while lovingsomeone deeply gives youcourage.” ~Lao Tzu
  • 34. Facts26,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year15,000 women die each year from ovarian cancer1 in 71 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer1 in 95 women die from ovarian cancer
  • 35. More FactsAbout 68% of women are 55 or older when diagnosedAbout 32% are diagnosed at younger agesOvarian cancer has the highest mortality rateOvarian Cancer is the fifth leading cause of death in women
  • 36. Application
  • 37. Class Activity
  • 38. Works CitedDizon, Don S., and Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum. 100 Questions & Answers about Ovarian Cancer. N.p.: Christopher Davis, 2006. Print. Ovarian cancer is shared by 20,000 women each year in the United States. It is the eight most common cancer in women with a lifetime risk of 1%. The book goes over explain where and what the ovaries are. It talks about what cancer and cysts’ are. It tells about the risk factors, diagnosis’s and the stages of ovarian cancer. The book tells about all the different treatments, side effects of the treatments, and what happens if the treatment fails. Finally it talks about remission and relapse. The book has a lot of detail and it is just what I needed. The has exactly what i need for my project! It breaks everything down and makes everything a lot simpler to understand.Freedman, Jeri. Ovarian Cancer. New York: n.p., 2009. Print. This book is different from “100 Questions and Answers about Ovarian Cancer,” because “100 Questions and Answers about Ovarian Cancer,” breaks every step down. That book is also a general book about most cancers and what can happen. The Ovarian Cancer book focuses just on ovarian cancer and how it works. It tells what ovarian cancer is, detections, treatments and how to live with it. This book is also a great source. Like the other book it is easy to understand and has exactly want i need. It goes into great detail about ovarian cancer. This book, like the other, will help me so much with my project.Guernsey, Diane. “The Silent Killer.” eLibrary. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Oct. 2010. The article is about Ovarian Cancer being a silent killer. Ovarian Cancer is not found until late stages for most cases because the person may not show symptoms. Women have a 1 in 70 chance of getting ovarian cancer but 1 in 20 if a relative has it. They percent of survival decreases as the person gets on higher stages. There are four stages of cancer and at the fourth stage the chances of living is 20%. It tells the different symptoms but says that the symptoms are not always caught until late stages. FInally it says that people should be tested for it even though the test may show no sign of ovarian cancer. The article helped me learn a lot more. It is coming from someones point of view and shows that people realize it is “The Silent Killer.” The article has given good facts for my project and inspired me to want more people to become more aware of ovarian cancer.Olson, S.H, et al. “Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer.” Obstetrics & Gynecology (Aug. 2001): n. pag. PDF file. THe most common symptoms shown from the women were unusual bloating, fullness and pressure in the abdomen. OVarian Cancer strikes about 23,000 women each year in the US, out of those 23,000 women about 14,000 die. The study shows that, that number is so high because Ovarian cancer is not found unto later stages which makes it harder for women to survive. In one of the charts it shows the statistics of women and the likeliness of getting ovarian cancer. Women over the age of 40 are more likely to get ovarian cancer. Women over the age of 35 that have never had children are the most likely to get ovarian cancer. Women with history in the family of, either, ovarian or breast cancer also have a high risk of getting ovarian cancer. The symptoms of ovarian cancer are very hard to make out ovarian cancer because it could be anything but ovarian cancer. The symptoms are very common and can happen in many sicknesses. THat is another reason why ovarian cancer is very hard to beat, because of the common symptoms it is one of the last things doctors look for.“Ovarian Cancer.” American Cancer Society (2009): n. pag. PDF file. Treatment- Surgery is the first step you can take in treating ovarian cancer. Surgery involves removing one or both ovaries, the uterus and the fallopian tubes. They would all be removed because they are all at risk of keeping or forming more ovarian cancer. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are also ways to treat ovarian cancer. Statistics- Survival rate for early stages is a 94%. ONly about 15% of of all ovarian cases are found in early stages. Survival rate for later stages are less than 45%. Risk- Women who are over the age of 35 that have never had children. Women over the age of 40 are more likely to get ovarian cancer. Women that have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer can form ovarian cancer. Women who breast feed reduce the risk of getting ovarian cancer.Vasilev, Steven. “Ovarian Cancer; How does cancer arise?” Article*: n. pag. The New York Times. Web. 22 Dec. 2010. <http:/‌http://ovariancancer.about.com/‌od/‌ovariancancerbasics/‌a/‌ovarian_cancer.htm>. This article is all about how ovarian cancer comes about and the different way to handle it. It tells about the ovaries and how the cancer is formed. The early signs of ovarian cancer. The article mentions the different tissues in the ovaries and the different types of tumors that can form.WebMD. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Dec. 2010. <http:/‌www.webmd.com/‌ovarian-cancer/‌default.htm >. This website has many different parts to it. It first has the basics of the ovaries and what the cancer is. It than goes into the different risk factors and how to get tested for it. It also talks about the diagnosis’s and the treatments that people can go through to get rid of ovarian cancer. That is what the website is all about. It has a lot of the same information as the article and the books I have reviewed but it also has a little more and breaks down somethings a little further.
  • 39. Conclusion