Race to the Top Presentation on Integrated Units

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Presented at the first annual Race to the Top conference for Ohio.

Presented at the first annual Race to the Top conference for Ohio.

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  • *While people are entering the room. Part I- Tracy's intro/demographics Part II- Steps 1-10 (cancer unit)  Part III- Arch's posters project slides Part IV- This is where you can put the bullying stuff, Jennifer Part V- Kate's bodies project slides
  • *Introductions/Contact Information
  • *Tracy
  • *Tracy
  • *Tracy
  • *Tracy Projects, portfolios, making work public, partners
  • *Tracy
  • *Kate - Introduction to Team Based Planning Notes: We have developed some common practices for team based planning – it breaks down into a nine step process.
  • *Kate – Learning Targets The first step is to look at the learning targets for the course. Start with National and State Standards, also determine what you want kids to know 5 or 10 years after they leave your class. From these ideas, we create our own learning targets for the course – sometimes they are more general that state/national standards, sometimes they are more sepcific than state/national standards, but all the time they are rooted in the standards. My example – looking at mitosis and cell division…use 2 much more general learning targets, but hit these learning targets through the theme of cancer, which is one of our unifying themes for the year (talk about in cell specialization, cells, genetics, health technology, etc).
  • *Kate – Inspiration Notes: We are using cancer as a unifying theme in both Biology and Wellness/Fitness – we should do something with this topic. Contacted GCCHD to see what we could do, they told the story of a breast cancer intervention several years ago – it was extremely successful but they haven’t been able to do anything like it since due to funding. This is where we come in!
  • *Arch
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Transcript

  • 1. Race to the TopOhio Annual Conference Fall 2011
  • 2. Creating Authentic Learning Experiences through Team Developed Projects The Dayton Regional STEM School Kate Cook, Biology/Anatomy and Physiology Arch Grieve, World History/Economics/Government Jennifer Leitsch, Language Arts Tracy Weissmann, Assistant Principal/Curriculum http://www.daytonstemschool.org/
  • 3. Mission To prepare students with the skills necessary to compete in the globaleconomy while nurturing inour young people the same enthusiasm for discovery, invention and applicationthat launched the vision for powered flight.
  • 4. Who are we?We serve: 335 students (183 in 2011-11) 29 districts throughout 6 counties 67% white (224) 16% black (55) 11% Multi Racial (37) 4% Asian (15) .8% Hispanic (3) .2% American Indian (1) 25% Free/Reduced Lunch 7 districts transport
  • 5. OUR PHILOSOPHYBy developing these five qualities Persistence Inquiry Communication Creativity Collaboration We create success!
  • 6. OUR APPROACH• Students engaged in authentic, real-world problems• Students assessed in a variety of ways• Meaningful relationships – school staff – students & families – the community – business partners – institutions of higher education
  • 7. 2011 OGT TEST SCORESSubj A Adva Acceler Profic B Limitect LL nced ated ient asic ed Rea 9 35.3 36.8 25 2. 0ding 7.1 9 Mat 9 48.5 30.9 11.8 7. 1.5 h 1.2 4 Writi 9 2.9 60.3 32.4 4. 0 ng 5.6 4 Scie 9 42.6 25 23.5 8. 0nce 1.2 8 Socia 9 49.3 20.3 23.2 4. 2.9 l 2.8 3 Studi es
  • 8. 2011 OAA TEST SCORESSubj A Advan Acceler Profic B Limiect ll ced ated ient asic ted Rea 1 39.6 33.3 27 0 0ding 00 Mat 8 14.6 37.5 31.3 14 2.1 h 3.3 .6 Scie 9 39.6 27.1 31.3 2. 0nce 7.9 1
  • 9. Team Based Planning In Nine “Simple” Steps
  • 10. Step 1: Learning Targets How do we determine what to teach for mastery? National Biology Standard: In multicellular organisms, growth occurs via a process called mitosis: a fertilized cell divides successively into many cells, with each parent cell passing identical genetic material to two daughter cells. -“A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-cutting Concepts, Core Ideas.” 2011.DRSS Biology Learning Targets: Cells - Students will describe structure and function of cells at the intracellular and molecular level, the interactions between cells and their environment, and the impact of cellular processes and changes on individuals. Molecular Basis of Heredity - Students will examine the role of DNA in transferring traits from generation to generation, in differentiating cells, and in evolving new species.
  • 11. Step 2: Inspiration What justifies an integrated unit? Where do ideas come from?• Cancer studies in Wellness/Fitness and Biology• Greene County Combined Health District- real world impact
  • 12. Step 3: IntegrationDetermine connections between learning targets.
  • 13. Step 4: Essential QuestionsDevelop an overarching essential question and sub questions.• Overarching Questions – relevant, meaningful• Specific questions for each content area - designed to help answer the overarching essential question through the lenses of the different classes Cancer Unit Overarching Question: How can we prevent and reduce the incidence of particular cancers in Greene County?
  • 14. Science: What is really going on in the body of a cancerpatient? How can we prevent cancer? How does early detection help?
  • 15. History: Mapping Cancer – What does it reveal? Doesplace matter with regards to cancer? If so, how? How can I use location to select a target audience for my intervention?
  • 16. Language Arts: How do people with cancer copewith their diagnosis and treatment? How do cancerpatients communicate their experiences? How do I design an intervention to help prevent/reduce the incidence of Cancer in Greene County?
  • 17. Math and HealthMath: How likely am Ito get cancer, andhow unique is mycancer profile? Howserious a task is it toremove canceroustissue from a part ofthe body?Health: How can ourbehaviors reduce therisk of cancer?
  • 18. Step 5: Final Product How do we make products relevant, meaningful, and public?Relevant, Meaningful,and Public – Product has real world significance – Product doesn’t already exist – Quality matters – Make the work extend beyond the school – Allow for student choice and voice
  • 19. Step 6: Partners How do we utilize partners to make it meaningful?
  • 20. Step 7: Implementation What are the key aspects of implementation?•Revisions/Multiple Drafts (self, peer to peer, partner,teacher)•Assessing the process, not necessarily the end product• Rubrics (possibly student developed)
  • 21. Models and Rubrics• Collection of models on a Wikispace (http://drsscancer.wikispaces.com/)• Students determine the characteristics that make the models work• They use these critiques to outline their own rubric• Rubrics are created with guidelines/input
  • 22. Step 8: ReflectionHow do students and teachers reflect on the process? • Reflection – Share with staff – before or after project • Lessons Learned from Cancer Project – Make expectations to our partners clear – Allow for student choice and voice
  • 23. Step 9: Public Exhibit Share your work!•Work with partners to make work public•Use as a way to share product but also celebrate students’ work
  • 24. Additional Projects
  • 25. Conflict andGenocide UnitIntegrated unit betweenLanguage Arts and WorldHistoryHighlights • Step 1-Learning Targets • Step 5-Final Product • Step 7- Assessment
  • 26. State Learning Targets “Regional and ethnic conflicts in the post-Cold War era have resulted in acts of terrorism, genocide and ethnic cleansing.” “Oppression and discrimination resulted in the Armenian Genocide during World War I and the Holocaust, the state-sponsored mass murder of Jews and other groups, during World War II.”Academic Content Standards Revision High School Social Studies Course Syllabi, Updated February2011
  • 27. My learning target based on the 10 NCSS ThemesPower, Authority, and Governance : Students will look atthe Rule of Law vs. the Rule of Man and try to determinewhether or not the 20th Century has been one of progress orone of decline in how we relate to one another in the realm ofgovernment. We will study what legitimizes power, howdifferent countries are governed, and how one can bringabout changes in those types of governments. Case studieswill include power struggles in Iran, India, China, NorthernIreland, Israel/Palestine, and South Africa. We will also studyvarious conflicts and genocides of the 20th Century, looking atthe Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, Cambodia, Bosnia,Rwanda, and Darfur, in an attempt to study these tragicoccurrences scientifically so we can understand how theyunfold and, more importantly, how they can be prevented.
  • 28. Grade the process, not the final product
  • 29. Bodies BookUnitIntegrated unit betweenBiology andWellness/FitnessHighlights • Step 3 – Natural Connections • Step 4 – Essential Questions • Step 6 – Using Partners • Step 7 – Multiple Drafts
  • 30. National Learning Targets Systems of specialized cells within organisms help themperform the essential functions of life, which involve chemicalreactions that take place between different types of molecules,such as water, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. All cellscontain genetic information in the form of DNA, which is wheregenes are located. Genes contain the instructions that code for theconfiguration of molecules called proteins, which carry out the workof cells. Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structuralorganization, in which any one system is made up of numerousparts and is itself a component of the next level. Feedbackmechanisms maintain a living system’s internal conditions withincertain limits and mediate behaviors, allowing it to remain alive andfunctional even as external conditions change within some range.Outside that range (e.g., at a too high or too low externaltemperature, with too little food or water available), the organismcannot survive. Feedback mechanisms can encourage (throughpositive feedback) or discourage (negative feedback) what is goingon inside the living system. – “A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices,Cross-cutting Concepts, Core Ideas.” 2011.
  • 31. My Learning Target Human Organism – Students willunderstand how the human organismprovides protection by the immune andnervous systems and cognition. Studentswill explain some of the ways in whichhuman body systems interact to maintain afairly constant environment for cells.
  • 32. Step 3: Determine Natural Connections
  • 33. Step 4: Essential Questions What would it look likeif you could peel back yourskin and take a look insideto see how your bodysystems function?
  • 34. Step 6: Partners How do we utilize partners to make it meaningful?
  • 35. Step 7: Multiple DraftsDRAFT 1 The cardiovascular system mainly depends on the heart and bloodvessels to transport blood throughout the body. Heart is in thecardiovascular system, which pumps blood, with the help of arteries, veins,and transport blood to cells in the body. (Texas Heart Institute)FINAL DRAFT The job of the circulatory system is to transport blood and O2throughout the body. Blood carries oxygen from the lungs and nutrients fromfood to the cells in the body. The circulatory system also helps removewaste products such as CO2, from the cells. The circulatory system carriescarbon dioxide from the cells to the lungs in order be exhaled, and takeswaste products to the kidneys for removal from the body. The heart, themain organ in the circulatory system, contains four chambers which helppump blood throughout the body. The blood is pumped away from the heartthrough the arteries, passes through the capillaries, and returns to the heartthrough the veins (The Franklin Institute.edu).
  • 36. Language Arts: Diversity & Inclusion Ad CampaignIntegrated unit with Language Arts, Math, Wellness &Fitness, and STEM FoundationsHighlights:Step 2 – InspirationStep 3 – ProductStep 6 – Natural Connections
  • 37. Inspiration & Product• Ad Council’s campaigns• Data-driven decisions with class-constructed survey• Cohesive designs
  • 38. Take Home Messages1. Find natural connections2. Find partnerships or help outside the classroom3. Find real world question and issues that matter4. Focus on the process, not necessarily the product
  • 39. Questions?