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EDS Specializes in Arc Flash Training and Arc Flash Analysis, among many other training modules to provide training needed for todays electrical workers. EDS services can be provided nation wide.......

EDS Specializes in Arc Flash Training and Arc Flash Analysis, among many other training modules to provide training needed for todays electrical workers. EDS services can be provided nation wide. This document highlights our services.

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  • 1. NFPA 70E Safety Training - 7 Hrs.Electrical dangers such as shock, electrocution, electrical explosion, andarc blast will always be present on the job, but a proper electricaltraining program and strategies can minimize the likelihood of injuriesand fatalities. Our NFPA 70E Training focuses on the 2012 NFPA 70E arcflash electrical safety standard that addresses arc flash electrical safetyrequirements for employee workplaces that are  necessary for thepractical safeguarding of employees.Upon completion of class students will be able to:1. Identify electrical hazards2. Identify causes of arc flash3. Explain the biological effects of electrical shock / arc flash4. Select appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) forapplicable situations5. Describe lockout / tagout procedures6. Identify the hazards and risks associated with arc flash7. Respond appropriately to an arc flash incident8. Demonstrate safe work practicesClass Agenda• Introduction to 2012 NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety inthe Workplace• Arc Flash Awareness – How to Identify Potential ElectricalHazards in the Workplace• OSHA 1910.331-335 Regulations• 2012 NFPA 70E Standards• Nature of Electric Arc / Blast• Understanding Shock Boundaries & Hazard Risk Categories• Interpretation of Equipment Warning Labels - NEC & NFPA 70E• PPE Selection & Maintenance Requirement• Electrical Safe Work Practices• Controlling Hazardous Energies (lockout / tagout)• Establishing an Electrical Safety Program, Principles, & Procedures• Recordkeeping Requirements• Safety Videos – PPE, Safe Electrical Work Practices• Testing of Students (tests covering PPE requirements, safeelectrical work practices and a review test covering materialpresented throughout the class) All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certification Card• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Student HandbookNFPA 70Ew w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.net
  • 2. Arc Flash Analysis and Power System StudiesThe NFPA 70E makes it clear the electrical equipment needs to beassessed and labeled properly.Article 130.5 states: An arc flash hazard analysis shall determine the arcflash boundary, the incident energy at the working distance, and the personalprotective equipment that the people within the arc flash boundary shall use.Electrical Diagnostic Surveys (EDS) can help your company comply withall aspects of the NFPA 70E. Our experts have extensive knowledge andexperience with electrical safety, electrical power systems, and theproject management experience necessary to comply with todaysstandards while having minimal impact on your current operations.Through years of diverse project experience EDS has developedinnovative and efficient methods to get the job done right and for lessthan the competition.Data CollectionCollecting the proper data from your power system is the mostimportant aspect of the arc flash analysis. Having correct and concise datais vital to achieving accurate results. EDS offers many options for datacollection to best suite your needs. Some of these options include off-sitesupervision and guidance of site personnel or local contractor, or onsitedata collection working with site personnel or local contractor.One-Line DevelopmentThe one-line diagram is the basis of analysis. Data collected in the field isentered into engineering software to build a snapshot of your existingpower system. Once this data is entered many different types of powersystem analysis can be performed, such as: Short Circuit Analysis,Protective Device Coordination, Load Flow Analysis, Harmonic Analysis,and Arc Flash Analysis.Arc Flash AnalysisAnalysis is performed in order to quantify arc flash energies, provideguidance on what level of personal protection is needed when working onequipment, and establish boundaries to keep non-qualified personnel asafe distance away. The results of the analysis are used to create andprovide arc flash labels to be posted at all electrical equipment, as well asspecific energized electrical work permits to be filled out when energizedwork is scheduled to take place. The labels and work permits includeinformation such as: incident energy, hazard risk category, arc flashboundary, shock boundaries.Other Power System Studies• Protective Device Coordination• Short Circuit Analysis• Load Flow Analysis• Harmonic AnalysisChallenge Questions:Have you performed and Arc Flash Analysis atyour facility?Is all of your electrical equipment labeled inaccordance with NFPA 70E?ARC FLASH ANALYSISw w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.net
  • 3. MEDIUM / HIGH VOLTAGE SAFETYw w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.netMedium / High Voltage Safety Training - 4 Hrs.Our Medium / High Voltage Electrical Safety Training establishes minimumstandards to ensure that worker’s health and safety are protected duringmedium voltage electrical work and is based upon, but not limited to,OSHA 1910.269, 1910.132(D), 1910.137 standards.OSHA makes a distinction between low voltage qualified employees (600volt and below) and those qualified for med/high voltage job tasks. Thereason for this distinction is equipment and conductors that carry med/high voltage warrant particular safety requirements and procedures.Electricians may only be licensed for particular voltage classes in somejurisdictions.There are many issues to consider when measuring med/highvoltage. Taking med/high voltage measurements can be hazardous to theequipment, to the unit under test, and to the employee.Also verifying zeroenergy, proper grounding techniques, and proper switching procedures iscritical to the safety of the employee. Per-requisite to this class is NFPA70E.Upon Completion Students will understand:1. Use of insulating and shielding materials for employee protection.Identify medium / high voltage safety hazards.2. Define the approach boundaries.3. Demonstrate the skills and techniques to distinguish live partsfrom other parts and determine the nominal voltage of live parts.4. Select appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for eachhazard category.5. Demonstrate safe electrical work practices working on or nearenergized equipment.6. Proper selection and use of rated test instruments andequipment.7. Use of insulating and shielding materials for employee protection.Course Agenda• Understand how to use special tools and special workprocedures for greater than 600 volts.• Know the clearance requirements for high voltage equipment,barrier and barricading requirements.• Understand special hazards associated with high voltageequipment.• Understand the approach boundaries (arc flash and shockboundaries).• Understand the definition and importance of each hazard riskcategory.• Selection and maintenance of proper PPE.• Importance of applying grounding clusters (grounding sets).• Understand special procedures and tools for extractingpersonnel from energized circuits.• Maintenance and inspection of voltage-rated gloves.• How to safely perform basic power quality measurements.• Recognizing the dangers of transient voltages and how to avoidthem.• The importance of a qualified observer.• Understand the workspace and guarding specified in the OSHAstandard.• Film and testing of students.Challenge question for your customer: Did youknow OSHA makes a distinction between low voltagequalified and medium/ high voltage qualified employees?All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certificate ofCompletion
  • 4. Lockout/Tagout Training - 2 hoursComment: EDS conducted a 2011 survey of a broad cross section of theelectrical industry that was comprised of 14 companies totaling 507electrical workers who were asked one question... do you implement yourcompanys energy control procedures on every job task?16 out of 507said "yes". These answers revel that our companies are not annuallyauditing their employees or enforcing the energy control program (noreprimand). The annual audit is required by OSHA to ensure thatemployees understand the Lockout/Tagout procedures and theimportance of implementing these procedures.Two of the top 10 OSHAcitations issued to companies are failure to implement an energy controlprogram and failure to enforce energy control procedures.Lockout / Tagout Training – OSHA 1910.147(c)(7)(iii)(C) “Retraining.The retraining shall reestablish employee proficiency and introduce newor revised control methods and procedures, as necessary.”Lockout / Tagout Training – OSHA 1910.269(a)(2)(iii) “The employershall determine, through regular supervision and through inspectionsconducted on at least an annual basis, that each employee is complyingwith the safety-related work practices required by this section.”Class Agenda• Recognizing lockout / tagout devices.• Installing lockout / tagout devices.• Duty of employer in writing and publishing procedures.• Duty of employee in executing procedures.• Duty of person-in-charge.• Authorized and unauthorized removal of locks / tags.• Enforcing execution of lockout / tagout procedures.• Individual employee control of energy.• Simple lockout / tagout.• Complex lockout / tagout.• Using single line and diagrammatic drawings to identify sources ofenergy.• Use of tags and warning signs.• Release of stored energy (electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic,thermal, chemical, mechanical, etc.)• Video and testing of students.Challenge question for your customer: Do youperform an annual adit of employees  regarding energycontrol procedures?All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certificate ofCompletionLOCKOUT / TAGOUTw w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.net
  • 5. NEC 2011 Update Training - 4 hoursOur NEC Code Class covers topics from Chapter 1 General, Chapter 2Wiring and Protection, Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials, Chapter4 Equipment for General Use and several important Annexs. We do notselect every topic in the first 4 chapters, but choose to address thosetopics that would be identified relevant to safety and would most affectthe cost of doing business. However we can customize certain areas ofinterest if notified in advance.The purpose of the NEC is the practical safeguarding of persons andproperty from hazards arising from the use of electricity. The NEC iswritten for qualified persons only. If electrical equipment is installedaccording to the code requirements and all the components forinstallation are listed and labeled for the application, and has beeninspected by the local authority having jurisdiction (AHJ), it is consideredsafe to operate. I think everyone would agree the code book can bedifficult to grasp. However, the problem at most industrial facilities is thatmost electrical workers are seldom updated with code requirements andno AHJ is inspecting the installation.The result is: damage to equipment(downtime) and elevated risk to personnel. EDS can help keep youremployees up-to-date, minimizing downtime and increase personal safety.NEC 2011 Update Training - 4 hoursOur NEC class can be customized to fit the needs of your company. Anycombination of the following topics can be included to meet yourrequirements.• Available Fault Current• GFCI Protection• Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Dwelling Units• Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlet Requirements• Outlet Requirements• Bonding Jumper• Grounding Separately• Derived Systems• Electrodes Permitted for Grounding• Use of Equipment Grounding Conductors• Protection Against Physical Damage• Underground Installations• Wiring in Ducts and Other Spaces for Environmental Air (Plenums)• Conductor Ampacity• Power Distribution Block in Junction Box•Switches Controlling Lighting•Receptacle Replacements• Disconnecting MeansChallenge question for your customer: Doesany of your employees attend NEC code update classes?If so, how long ago?All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certificate ofCompletionNEC UPDATEw w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.net
  • 6. w w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.netNFPA 70BNFPA 70B Training - 4 Hrs.In todays global economy, the quest for increased productivity is a givenfor most commercial and industrial facilities. Keeping those facilitiesrunning smoothly at maximum efficiency requires a host of programsinvolving all aspects of the operation, including maintaining the electricalequipment.Based upon OSHAs preamble Subpart S, 33% of incidents and fatalitiesoccur due to failure to maintain the electrical equipments integrity.Although most facilities call on outside contractors to perform Med/Highvoltage equipment maintenance, often low voltage equipment such asmolded case circuit breakers, insulated case circuit breakers, and 600 voltmotor control centers are often neglected. Breaker manufacturers statethat if this type of equipment is not properly maintained in a 5 year period,a failure rate of 40% can occur.Results: extensive equipment damage and elevated risk to employees.An effective electrical preventive maintenance (EPM) program goes wellbeyond that. It must ensure all personnel implementing the maintenanceprocedures are up to speed on what constitutes equipment sustainabilityand an electrical safe work environment for employees. Thats whereNFPA 70B, Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance,comes in.Course Agenda• Substations• Switchgear Assemblies• Auxillary Equipment• Power and Distribution Transformers• Air Circuit Breakers - Medium Voltage• Molded-Case Circuit Breakers in Power Plants• Fuses• Protective Relays• Rotating Equipment• Grounding• Motor Control Equipment• Maintenance Intervals• Power CablesProper maintenance of med/high voltage electrical equipment insuresstability of the power system and prevents personal injuries to employees.Challenge question for your customer: Do youperform maintenance on low voltage molded case circuitbreakers and insulated case circuit breakers?All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certificate ofCompletion
  • 7. Meter Safety Training - 2 hoursWe ask participants in our meter safety program to bring theirdigital multi-meter to class to determine the safety category ratingand compliance with IEC 61010-1 (International  ElectrotechnicalCommission) safety requirements for electrical equipmentmeasurement. Understanding the proper category rating of anelectricians test equipment is important for his or her safety. Thedigital multi-meter and voltage testers are the cause of manyinjuries and fatalities. Failure to confirm zero energy can result inelectrocutions and failure to have the appropriate test equipmentfor the work environment can result in arc flash event to occur.Class Summary• International safety specifications• Identify IEC installation categories• Identification of IEC safety markings• Understand common multi-meter safety issues• Example and case studies of safety incidents• Overvoltage categories and voltage withstand• Dangers of transient voltages• DMM safety hazards, inspections and checklist• Meter and probe safety inspection• Film and testing of studentsStudents may bring their hand-held instrument (DMM andvoltage tester) and test leads for a complimentary safetycheckup.Challenge question for your customer: Are youaware of the International Electrotechnical CommitteeArticle 61010-1 regarding meter safety requirements?All students will receive the following withthe completion of the class:• Electrical Diagnostic Surveys Certificate ofCompletionMETER SAFETYw w w . a r c fl a s h t r a i n i n g . n e tElectrical Diagnostic SurveysFranklin Office8401 Claude-Thomas Rd. Ste. 43Franklin, OH 45005Phone: 888.502.3026Fax: 888.502.3026Email: support@arcflashtraining.netWeb: www.arcflashtraining.net