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Data, axioms, and principles of strategic communication in the workplace. (c) 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.

Data, axioms, and principles of strategic communication in the workplace. (c) 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • That’s enough to make a celebrity marriage look like a sure thing. I’m being facetious, of course. But when you think about it, what this statistic really means is that you are better off investing in a sector spider—anindustry index mutual fund—thanyou are in companies that have just announced a merger, for 57 percent of the time, the industry index will win.The starlets:Kim Kardashian (upper left)Lisa Marie Presley (upper right)Britney Spears (center)Drew Barrymore (lower left)Jennifer Lopez (lower right)
  • Two otherwise unrelated newspaper articles this morning, one on the front page of The Wall Street Journal and the other on the front page of The New York Times, describe vividly the chaos amid disaster when people suddenly lack the technology to communicate. I encourage you to read both articles. They offer insight for everyday work. Though disasters are thankfully rare, the failure of communication is commonplace. It is rarely a failure of technology, however. Rather, it is a failure of leadership, of will. The Wall Street Journal article reports on the hours and days in the wake of Hurricane Katrina's landfall. It seems that the New Orleans mayor's inner circle was holed up in the Hyatt Hotel with no means of communicating with the outside world for two solid days. A backup generator had run out of diesel fuel, and cellphone towers lay flattened by the 150-mph winds. Even police radios failed to work. The leadership team's isolation compounded the city's paralysis as the levees broke and a deluge swept over New Orleans. The New York Times article focuses on another disaster altogether: the collapse of the World Trade Center towers four years ago. Recall that the south tower collapsed first. Recently disclosed documents reveal that firefighters in the north tower were oblivious to the devastation just 200 feet away. Though it strains our credulity today, they couldn't see it and they didn't hear it. Their lines of communication were entirely out. The Times reports that perhaps 200 firefighters could have escaped death in the north tower had they known it would come crashing down just minutes later. The consequences of these breaches of communication were horrific. People died who otherwise might have lived.   Of course, during the normal course of business, the effects of miscommunication are not nearly so grave. We can be thankful that human life is rarely at stake. But fortunes and livelihoods are. Even in the enlightened 21st century, there are companies whose senior leadership team is in contact mainly with itself and with division heads, with the investment houses, and with McKinsey consultants. Communication with employees on strategic challenges and imperatives often takes a backseat. These unfortunate priorities create a separateness, an isolation, that serves no one's best interest. 
  • Have you ever seen the classic movie Cool Hand Luke? You should rent it. Actor Strother Martin, playing the burly captain of a Southern prison's chain gain, sternly rebukes a prisoner played by Paul Newman. "What we have here is a failure to communicate," the captain drawls. Later, the Newman character sarcastically tosses the same line back at the captain. In so many companies today, we do have a failure to communicate, and it is costly. All other things being equal, ground-level employees who know what matters to the company, who think critically about their work, who appreciate what is at stake, and who grasp their own role and potential contribution will perform better, far better, than their peers who don't. That's a broad, even audacious claim, but it really amounts to common sense.   The converse is also true. Managers who are in regular, routine communication with ground-level employees can get prompt intelligence on the reaction of customers or the tardiness of a shipment or the accuracy of a blueprint. They have an invaluable resource. It never ceases to amaze me that some managers -- indeed many managers -- don't value this ground-level intelligence. Those who do value it have a big advantage over those who don't. Here's the bottom line: Systematic, two-way communication is critical to the execution of any strategy that ultimately depends for its success on the discretionary, aligned behavior of employees. The communication has to be factual, relevant, clear, timely, and important. Given that, it can make the difference between a leadership team's knowledgeable decision and an ignorant one. It can also make the difference between alignment and misalignment. Even apart from the success or failure of a grand corporate vision or a breakthrough business strategy, inclusive communication can spell the difference between living in creative, dynamic community or stagnant isolation. One of those -- community or isolation -- is a path toward intellectual, emotional and even financial richness, the other a path toward intellectual, emotional and even financial poverty. You decide which is which, and you decide which it is that you want for your company
  • We're all familiar with the children's experiment of using two empty tin cans tied together by a string. Supposedly the tin cans can carry a conversation by vibrating in sync as they capture sound waves at one end and then reproduce the same sound waves at the other end.It turns out that something similar happens between people. You can think of each tin can as a primitive human brain. Just as a can absorbs and produces sound through vibration, so the human brain creates and receives sound waves as brain waves. The waves are the embodiment of information—everything from facts to emotions, from observations to ideas, from names to arguments.Researchers at Princeton University recently discovered that, in good communication, a speaker's brain waves closely resemble a listener's. MRI scans of the two brains show them to be in sync. In poor communication, the opposite is true; the brain waves are not in sync. Thus, the power of communication is the power to bring brain waves into alignment.
  • by Thomas J. LeeBack in the 1980s a onetime IBM salesman and singing cowboy by the name of Robert Fulghum wrote a little book that became a worldwide sensation. All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten stayed atop the best-seller lists for two solid years. It was translated into 27 languages and sold in more than 100 countries.As the title suggests, this marvelous book asserted that the really important verities of life we learn as young children. Perhaps nowhere is that more true than in communication, especially for the sake of leadership.Consider what we learned about communication as youngsters on the playground:Thou shalt not lie.Practice what you preach.Actions speak louder than words.Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me.Seeing is believing.In other words, we learn early on that credibility is the currency of communication. We learn that we cannot get away with just saying whatever we want, when we really don’t mean it. Other people resent and dislike that, and they will resent and dislike us.As we grow into adults, we come to appreciate the significance of this. We realize that all the fast and fulsome talk in the world cannot buy the allegiance and dedication of people: our kids or our employees or our constituents. Only our credibility as leaders can do that. Without credibility, our communication is like counterfeit money.Moreover, we realize that the measuring rod of credibility does not belong to us as leaders. It rather belongs to the people we seek to lead. They and they alone measure our credibility. If they find it in our leadership, we and they can go anywhere. If they don’t, we and they can go nowhere.Those of us who think a little longer about the challenge of credibility also realize that, when we begin to assert ourselves as leaders, credibility becomes more elusive and difficult. It begins with simple trust, for sure, but it also seems to demand more than trust alone. It also requires respect and affinity with people.By trust, we have in mind a high regard for the veracity of one's word. People who trust someone believe the person is telling the truth. The truth that he tells may be a factual depiction of reality. Or it may be a sincere statement of intent, or a frank and honest description of his opinion, values, or perspective. Whatever path it takes, it must square with reality.By respect, we're referring to a high regard for the leader's command, control, and competence: his ability, energy, initiative, resources, and perseverance—in short, his authority. In the colloquial, this quality is often referred to as "street cred." People must recognize and respect a leader's capacity for situational authority in order to believe he is capable of accomplishing that which he is setting out to accomplish.By affinity, we mean a high regard for a common bond of interests, needs, and concerns. Apart from someone under the hypnotic spell of a cult, no one willingly follows a leader whose purpose runs counter to their own well-being. Rather, people look for nobility of intent: an honorable purpose that aligns with their own well-being. What is important and valuable to the leader must be, or must become, important and valuable to the people she would lead, and vice versa.One or even two of these three cornerstones is not enough. Respect and affinity in the absence of trust leaves a residue of doubt. Affinity and trust in the absence of respect leaves a residue of skepticism. Trust and respect in the absence of affinity leaves a residue of opposition. Leaders need all three: trust, respect, and affinity with people.Now most of us didn’t actually learn this part in kindergarten. Those who never learn it at all will never capture the hearts and minds of people. They will never lead.
  • The Colorado River (Mohave: 'Aha Kwahwat,[9] Havasupai: Ha Ŧay Gʼam or Sil Gsvgov,[10] Spanish: Río Colorado) is the principal river of the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. The 1,450-mile (2,330 km) river drains an expansive, arid watershed that encompasses parts of seven U.S. and two Mexican states. Rising in the central Rocky Mountains in the U.S., the river flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau before reaching Lake Mead on the Arizona–Nevada line, where it turns south towards the international border. After entering Mexico, the Colorado forms a large delta, emptying into the Gulf of California between Baja California and Sonora.Known for its dramatic canyons and whitewater rapids, the Colorado is a vital source of water for agricultural and urban areas in the southwestern desert lands of North America.[11] The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs and aqueducts, which furnish water for irrigation and municipal supplies of almost 40 million people both inside and outside the watershed.[12][13] The Colorado's steep drop through its gorges is also utilized for the generation of significant hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West.[14] Since the mid-20th century, intensive water consumption has dewatered the lower course of the river such that it no longer reaches the sea except in years of heavy runoff.[15]
  • Striving primarily for clear articulation and influenceLack of empathy for other, divergent viewsReliance on cascading information down the ranksConfusing information with communicationRegarding communication as a task, a one-time eventTendency to oversimplify at expense of credibility

Transcript

  • 1. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.unauthorized reproduction or presentation is strictly prohibited
  • 2. Our Agenda• Offer a business case for leadership and communication• Unpack leadership and management, engagement and alignment• Identify and solve problems of communication for leadership• Analyze barriers and find solutions for building engagement• Give you actionable principles, strategies, and tactics © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 3. We’re here to challengeand grow the businessmodel of your job, toshow you the importance,the impact and thesatisfaction . . . © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 4. . . . of leading people,and to give you the toolsof communication you needto do the job well. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 5. The Importance of Dignity Dignity is as essential to human life as water, food, and oxygen. The stubborn retention of it can hold a man‟s soul in his body long past the point at which the body should have surrendered. The loss of it can carry a man off as surely as thirst, hunger, exposure, and asphyxiation, and with greater cruelty. Laura Hillenbrand Louis Zamperini Unbroken
  • 6. Arceil Leadership• At crossroads of leadership, engagement, and change• Extensive command of best practices• Benchmarked approximately 30 top-tier companies• Powerful, grounded models of leadership communication• Consulting, coaching, speaking, training• Workshops teach managers how to lead people
  • 7. About Thomas Lee• Decades of experience• Former newspaper columnist• Fortune 25 CEO‟s speechwriter• Spoken in 12 countries• Consulting since 1997• Many Fortune 500 clients• Blogs at www.MindingGaps.com
  • 8. The Data
  • 9. Numbers tell a story. Beth Bardens microbiologist © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 10. What is the story the following numbers are telling? © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 11. 80%of all change initiatives fall short of expectations. John Kotter, Leading Change
  • 12. 57%of all mergers return less to shareholders than theaverage for their industry. Harvard Business Review
  • 13. 72% - 91%of all projects fail to achieve their goals and targets. Standish Group
  • 14. 78% of employees report that they are“currently involved” in one or more projects that will fail. VitalSmarts
  • 15. 77%of employees agree the phrase “slow-motion train wrecks”aptly describes these projects. VitalSmarts
  • 16. OMG, that‟s twoout of every three companies! 67% of all companies surveyed report their quality efforts “have stalled or fallen short” of yielding real improvement. McKinsey & Company
  • 17. 85%of all re-engineering projects“just plain and outright fail.” Management Review
  • 18. 90%of employees say they know in advance when a project will fail to meet its goals and objectives . . .. Standish Group
  • 19. . . . but only 19%believe they can notify managementwithout being blamed for the failure. (d’oh!) Standish Group
  • 20. Since 1987 job satisfaction in the United States has plummeted 16 points*, or 26% Conference Board* Most recent data available
  • 21. Job Satisfaction in the United States 1987-200961% 59% 51% 52% 45% Source: Conference Board
  • 22. Distribution of People Engagement United States WorldwideCreative Engagement 28 % 21 %Active EngagementPassive Engagement 41 % 54 %Passive Disengagement 38 %Active Disengagement 18 % Sources: Gallup, Towers Watson
  • 23. Five Tiers of Engagement Passive Passive Engagement Disengagement © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved Active Engagement Active CreativeDisengagement Engagement ~10% ~30% ~40% ~15% ~5% approximate distribution of companies (median of ground-level people)
  • 24. High people engagement accounts for 9.4% growth in corporate net income. ISR
  • 25. On average, disengaged people missmore days of work per yearthan engaged people miss. Conference Board
  • 26. Therefore, physical absenteeism alone costs $902per disengaged person, on average, or a total of$79.2 billion per year in the United States.
  • 27. Altogether, the active disengagement of people costs2.1% - 2.5% of all economic activity, conservatively estimated. (Multiply that by your total revenue.)
  • 28. In the United States, that adds up to between $297 billion and $353 billion per year © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 29. Customers Do Notice © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 30. What Exactly AreWe Talking About?
  • 31. n. en•gage•ment
  • 32. Five Kinds of Positive Mental Attitude Commitment Loyalty Morale / Satisfaction Alignment Engagement © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 33. Commitment _______________________Rising to the level of courage, real commitment in the work place is doing whatever it takes, and more, to satisfy the customer within the constraints of safety, the law, and ethical decency. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 34. Loyalty _______________________The disposition of employees to continue serving the needs of their employer and its customers in an honest, productive manner in exchange for agreed- upon compensation and security. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 35. Morale and Satisfaction _______________________The degree of happiness or contentment that people derive from their employment, as a function of compensation, workplace conditions, personal and professional relationships, employment security, and opportunity. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 36. Alignment _______________________The reliable performance of duties necessary for the organization to meet the expectations of its customers, most commonly in terms of product quality, delivery and service requirements, production and sales quotas, and work processes. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 37. The Four Elements of Engagement _______________________A culture of discretionary effort—focus, curiosity,passion, and courage—that partners bring to theirwork in support and service to the organization, its purpose, and its customers. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 38. The Genome of EngagementFo CuFocus CuriosityPa CoPassion Courage © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 39. Four Elements of Engagement Focus • Focus on strategic situation • Focus on customer needs and expectationsFo • Focus on competitive advantages, disadvantages • Focus on organizational strategy and progressFocus • Focus on personal contribution to success • Focus on future growth and development © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 40. Four Elements of Engagement Curiosity • Curiosity on business situation and needs • Curiosity on customer challengesCu • Curiosity on competitor strengths, weaknesses • Curiosity on vendor quality, pricingCuriosity • Curiosity on personal strengths, weaknesses • Curiosity on implications of strategy • Curiosity on opportunities for improvement © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 41. Four Elements of Engagement Passion • Passion for excellence • Passion for customer satisfactionPa • Passion for the technology or process • Passion for creative solutionsPassion • Passion for collaboration and teamwork • Passion for constant improvement © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 42. Four Elements of Engagement Courage • Courage to change one‟s own habits • Courage to face uncertainty and riskCo • Courage to observe objectively and accurately • Courage to reason rigorously, not impetuouslyCourage • Courage to ask difficult questions • Courage to make innovative suggestions • Courage to speak truth to power © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 43. Our Thesis
  • 44. Nothing of much consequence has ever been achieved, andnothing of much value has ever been created, that wasn‟t, atsome time . . . • the point of someone‟s single-minded, intense focus • the object of someone‟s deep curiosity • the subject of someone‟s consuming passion • the product of someone‟s persevering courage
  • 45. Therefore, we can grow these four things alone • single-minded, intense focus • deep curiosity • © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved consuming passion • enduring courageto change the culture and thus the future of an organization.
  • 46. Five Axiomsof Leadership
  • 47. 1. The Central Axiom The work of leadership is different from the work of management. Their purpose and product are different.They require different competencies, different mindsets,and different communication, in substance and in style. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 48. Management _______________________ The hard work of ensuring performance to a predetermined expectation, as in quantity or quality:a budget, a quota, a standard, or a deadline, for example © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 49. Alignment is the work product,the deliverable, of the work ofmanaging.If you talk about managing, youmust talk about its deliverable:alignment of people.If you talk about alignment, youmust talk about its primarydriver: managing people. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 50. Leadership _______________________The harder work of envisioning, inspiring, and bringingabout significant change or breakthrough performancethrough the discretionary and self-sacrificing efforts of people, often in a state of uncertainty, despair, or risk © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 51. Engagement is the work product,the deliverable, of the work ofleading people.If you talk about leading, you musttalk about its deliverable: theengagement of people.If you talk about engagement, youmust talk about its primary driver:leading people. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 52. Mindset of Managing Managing is concerned with meetingpredetermined expectations, so goodmanagers are always on the lookout for negative deviations from the norm. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 53. Negative deviations from the norm signal problems, and managers want to avoid problems. The sooner they see these problems, the better.Good managers thus discourage deviations from the norm. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 54. Mindset of Leading Leading is concerned with big change or breakthrough performance, so good leaders are always on the lookout for positive deviations from the norm. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 55. Positive deviations from the norm signalopportunities, and leaders want to seize those opportunities. The sooner they see these opportunities, the better. Good leaders thus encourage deviations from the norm. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 56. Contrasting Paradigms I Paradigm of Paradigm of Managing LeadingPurpose Compliance ChangeDeliverable Alignment EngagementAuthority Official MoralElevation Appointment Tacit acclamationDynamic Power over people Power of peopleMotivation Kick in the pants Pride, satisfactionRhetoric “You must do this” “We can do this” © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 57. Contrasting Paradigms II Paradigm of Paradigm of Managing LeadingResources Scarce; zero sum Growing; win/winTone Mandatory AspirationalInformation Data, analysis InvocationConversation Report Talk Rapport TalkThrust Rational, influence Emotional, inspirationMood Pessimism, fear Optimism, confidenceLookout for Problems Opportunities © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 58. Pyramid of Engagement Creative Engagement © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved. Active Engagement Passive Engagement Passive Disengagement Active Disengagement
  • 59. Gear Box for Engagement Awareness Understanding Acceptance Commitment(5.0) OverdriveCreative Engagement Focus Curiosity Passion Courage Attention Clarity Trust Cooperation(4.0) DriveActive Engagement Acquaintance Familiarity Ambivalence Inertia(3.0) NeutralPassive Engagement Distraction Confusion Apathy Neglect(2.0) ParkPassive Disengagement Alienation Denial Cynicism Resistance(1.0) ReverseActive Disengagement
  • 60. Why So Low? _______________________Most successful companies are well-managed,for good management is what it took to succeed in the 20th Century.Few companies even understand the hard workof leadership. Alas, good leadership is what it will take to succeed in the 21st Century. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 61. Increasing Need for LeadershipAttention, Resources, Time Work of Leading Work of Managing © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved 20th Century 21st Century Slow Pace of Change Fast Narrow Geographic Dispersion Broad Little Delegation of Authority Much Simple Stakeholder Expectations Complex Modest Employees Sophistication Great
  • 62. Each of You Wears Two Hats Anyone with responsibility for the work of other people must be both a manager and a leader. Leaders can be primary or collateral. Both are vital. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 63. Distributed Leadership Primary Leadership Collateral Leadership• Identifies the need for change or • Endorses the need for change or breakthrough performance breakthrough performance• Creates the vision of future • Translates big picture to small• Campaigns for the vision • Builds, sustains support for vision• Empowers collateral leaders • Listens to ground-level people for stories• Absorbs real-world stories, data • Speaks truth to power with civility © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 64. Speak it carefully, with respect. Speak it calmly, with civility.But speak it. Always, always speak it. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 65. 2. The Axiom of EnergyBefore it can generate the energy of change, leadership requires the energy of good communication. Without communication,efforts to lead invariably wither and die. In areal sense, leadership is its communication. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 66. Communication is the real work of leadership. Nitin Nohria Dean Harvard Business School
  • 67. Information, like electricity,is kinetic. It is something notto be possessed, but ratherto be circulated. Its power,its capacity to shed light,depends upon its movement.
  • 68. A funny thing happensin the absence of communication. Not what you want. Never what you want. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 69. World Trade Center11 September 2001 © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 70. Hurricane Katrina28-29 August 2005 © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 71. What we have here, is failure to communicate. Captain, Road Prison 36 (Strother Martin) Cool Hand Luke (1967) Jalem Productions Directed by Stuart Rosenberg; written by Donn Pearce and Frank Pierson
  • 72. The biggest problem withcommunication is the illusionthat it has taken place. George Bernard Shaw © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 73. Communication as Energy • Responsible people are unlikely to abuse your trust • They need information to work strategically • It must be clear, credible, coherent, constructive • Your retreating to silence or inaccessibility is corrosive • Hiding or hoarding strategic information backfires © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 74. Communicate for a Change! In the modern corporation,leadership without communication is pointless, and communication without leadership is irrelevant. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 75. Management vs. Leadership Communication Differs in Substance and Style Management Leadership• Seeks compliance with standards • Seeks change and breakthrough• Content is specific, detailed • Content is broad, general• “Assign to align” • “On page to engage”• Stresses accountability • Stresses big opportunity• Strives to control and influence • Strives to free up and inspire• Declarative and pessimistic • Aspirational and optimistic• Worries about failure • Expects success Differences in communication reflect difference in purpose. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 76. No pessimist ever discovered Optimism is faith that leadsthe secret of the stars, or to achievement. Nothing cansailed to an uncharted land, or be done without hope andopened a new doorway for the confidence.human spirit. Helen Keller © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 77. Competency Level Unconsciously Competent Consciously Competent Consciously Incompetent Unconsciously Incompetent © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 78. Competency Level Communication for Leading Is Unconsciously Naturally and effortlessly frequent, Competent candid, respectful, substantive, mutual Consciously Deliberate, scheduled, structured, Competent filtered, stressful, forced, scripted Consciously Impersonal, arbitrary, slow, anxious, Incompetent legalistic, euphemistic, unreliable Unconsciously Absent or sporadic; deceitful, Incompetent insubstantial, confusing, threatening © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 79. 3. The Axiom of Choice Leaders need followers. People decide forthemselves whether to follow any particularleader—and how fervently and for how long.The choice is always theirs and theirs alone. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 80. We don‟t usually think ofbusiness as a democracy.Employees don‟t elect theirmanagement, after all.But they can and do “elect”their leaders. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 81. They choose which leaders tofollow and which to ignore.Thus, they and they alonedecide whether to follow you.So you must earn theengagement of your people. Youcannot just assume it. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 82. County Election George Caleb Bingham (1852) What It Does Not Meanabdication of authority • manipulation • groveling © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 83. Freedom of Speech Norman Rockwell (1943) What It Does Meanlistening to subordinates • collaboration • campaigning © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 84. 4. The Axiom of ConnectionLeadership requires a vibrant, resilient connection between a leader and people. That connectiondepends on trust in, respect for, and affinity withthe leader. This trusting connection is everything. © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 85. What Word Is Missing Here?• our fathers brought forth• now we are engaged in a great civil war• we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground• it is for us the living• they gave the last full measure of devotion• we here highly resolve• government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 86. Map of English Pronouns Person and Case Singular PluralFirst Person Nominative I weFirst Person Possessive my or mine our or oursFirst Person Objective me usSecond Person Nominative you youSecond Person Possessive your or yours your or yoursSecond Person Objective you youThird Person Nominative he, she, it theyThird Person Possessive his / her or hers / its their or theirsThird Person Objective him, her, or it them © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 87. 1. This rope represents the connection between leaders and followers.2. My right hand is leadership.3. My left hand is followership.4. The direction of change is to my right.5. As my right hand (leadership) moves toward my right, what happens?6. If we switch the direction of change, and my right hand (still leadership) moves toward my left, what happens?7. What is the natural reaction of anyone who is being pushed?8. What can you infer from this little exercise? © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 88. If you are working on something excitingthat you really care about, you don‟t haveto be pushed. The vision pulls you. Steve Jobs
  • 89. The Practical Limits of CoercionThe trouble with coercivepower is that it onlystrengthens resistance.And, if successful, itscontrolling effect onlylasts as long as the force isstrong. It is not organic. Robert K. Greenleaf Servant Leadership
  • 90. Leadership is a reciprocal relationshipbetween those who choose to lead andthose who decide to follow. . . . If there isno underlying need for the relationship,then there is no need for leaders. James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner Credibility
  • 91. What is the underlying needfor this relationship here?
  • 92. When a relationship is unraveling, the first sign isworsening communication. People avoid the truth,cover up the truth, color the truth, and hide thetruth. They resort to shouting and invective. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 93. Conversely, when a relationship is healthy, thevital signs all have to do with good communication.The communication is frequent, respectful,truthful, and appropriate to the relationship. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 94. How is your brain like a tin can?How are brain waves like string? © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 95. You _______________________Your capacity to lead rides on the perception by prospective followers as to the nobilityof your intent and the fact of your connection to their interests, needs and concerns.
  • 96. The Optimal Connection Is . . . • Factual, providing the foundation for focus • Rational, providing the foundation for curiosity • Emotional, providing the foundation for passion • Behavioral, providing the foundation for courage. . . and you are responsible for it. (Yes, you.) © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 97. Never doubt the ability of asmall group of thoughtful,committed individuals with acommon purpose to change thecourse of history. Indeed, it isthe only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
  • 98. 5. The Axiom of Integrity Communication is much more than the expression orexchange of information and ideas. It is the wholenessof thinking, speaking, and acting. It may be inadvertent, indirect, and implicit, and it is often misinterpreted. © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 99. in•teg•ri•ty in•te•grate in•te•ger in•te•gral[Origin: 1450-1510: late Middle English integrite < Latin integritās: untouched, hence undivided, whole, oneness] © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 100. Saying and Doing havequarrel‟d and parted. Benjamin Franklin
  • 101. Respect Trust Robust Credibility Affinity© 2010 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 102. The Heart of Your Leadership Leadership Your Self Your Leadership © Copyright2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved
  • 103. You are the message. Roger Ailes
  • 104. Music is your own experience,your thoughts, your wisdom. Ifyou don‟t live it, it won‟t comeout in your horn. Charlie Parker
  • 105. Three Voices Must Become One• Together the voices must  send consistent messages  honor the nobility of an organization‟s values  encourage congruence of behavior with strategy  facilitate a mutually respectful dialogue with partners• Otherwise, it‟s a roll of the dice The formal voice can never operate in a vacuum.
  • 106. Thinking AboutCommunication
  • 107. Only 50%of American employees say their supervisors give them the information they need to do their job well. DG&A
  • 108. Only 42%of American employees say their supervisors keep them informed as to whatis happening elsewhere in the organization. DG&A
  • 109. Only 41%of American employees feel that their supervisors take action on ideas and concerns expressed by the people on their team. DG&A
  • 110. 46% of workers in the United States saythey cannot discuss issues of workplace ethics with their boss. Spherion
  • 111. Poor communication ofbusiness information by management is the No. 1 frustration of corporate employees. Opinion Research
  • 112. Just what is communication, anyway?
  • 113. Communication _______________________Anything that conveys information or creates meaning for people © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 114. Purpose of Communication in Business It Enables Leaders to Lead!• By conveying vision, principles, goals, strategies• By teaching people about the business © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.• By providing reliable data and coherent rationale• By bringing expectations into line with reality• By restoring the meaning of work through trust• By inspiring engagement with a leader‟s vision
  • 115. Imagine Two Teams Playing SoccerThey are evenly matched except the players on one team know whose goal is whose, and the players on the other team are confused as to whose goal is whose. Which team will win: the team that knows whose goal iswhose, or the team that doesn’t know whose goal is whose? © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 116. Strategic Communication _______________________Communication—which, remember, is anythingthat conveys information or creates meaning—of, on, or about business strategy © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 117. Safety on the jobCustomer satisfactionGoals and commitmentsProduction plans, cap exRoles and responsibilitiesProcesses and procedures © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.Training mandatesWorkplace securityCompensation, benefitsPersonnel reassignmentsOffice 2010 training scheduleEmployee recreation, hobbies
  • 118. Strategic Messages Require . . . • Systematic process to ensure dissemination • High levels of clarity, credibility, coherence • Speed, repetition, redundancy, memorability • Interpretation for application by workers • Appeal on both factual and emotional wavelengths • Ultimately, collaboration with workers © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 119. Do You See Much of This?• Stifled, choked flow of upward information• Tendency for positive spin on negative news• Departmental isolation and rivalries• Actions bearing no resemblance to strategy• Buzzwords or euphemisms obscuring reality• Hoarding useful information• Saying one thing but intending to do something else• Relying on fine print or half-truth to make the numbers © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 120. If So, You Will See This . . . • Little sense of common purpose • Apathy toward the sincerity of leadership • Widespread resistance, obstruction to change • People “going through the motions” or worse ▪ distraction or alienation Passive or ▪ confusion or denial Active ▪ apathy or cynicism Disengagement ▪ neglect or resistance © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 121. . . . Instead of This• Deep commitment to achieving a vision• Rapid sharing of vital information up, down, across• Effective response to competitor threats• Openness to new ideas, change• Creativity, urgency, alignment, initiative• Ethically grounded, strategically shrewd decisions © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 122. Metamessage _______________________ A message in the context of itsenvironment, expectations, and experience: what people think they hear and see © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 123. Prism of the MetamessageManagement’s Employee Messages Metamessages• Information • Perceptions• Strategy Their • Conclusions• Priorities • Judgments Environment Experiences Expectations by observation and speculation © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 124. Prism of the MetamessageManagement’s Employee Messages Metamessages• Information • Perceptions• Strategy • Conclusions• Priorities Their • Judgments EnvironmentWhat You Say What People Experiences Hear and See Expectations by observation and speculation © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 125. Prism of the Metamessage What PeopleWhat You Said Remember Their © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved. Environment Experiences Expectations by observation and speculation
  • 126. What We KnowFor Sure AboutCommunication
  • 127. What We Know for Sure About Communication1. Messages count, but metamessages count more2. Formal, verbal communication alone usually fails3. Facts that people don‟t know, or are mistaken about, matter most4. Communication is more than moving information5. Faster communication is better than slower, but not too fast6. Dialogue is essential, not optional, and central to meaning7. Nonverbal communication is critical but more than body language8. Cascading is tricky, slow, and usually self-defeating © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 128. Electric communication will never be a substitute for the faceof a person who with his soul encourages another person to bebrave and true. Charles Dickens (1870)
  • 129. “You’ve Got (More) Email”• Limit use when conversation and dialogue are easy or necessary• Do rely on email to:  Communicate data in detail or simultaneously  Convey information with immediacy, especially across time zones  Build and maintain a paper trail when necessary• Power up the Subject: line with FYI, RSVP, or Action Needed• Save and re-read messages later before sending (best a whole day)• Beware lack of emotion, humor, and irony common to conversation• Avoid routinely sending CYA copies to senior managers © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 130. BewareAn Urban Myth! Albert Mehrabian Interpersonal communication supposedly consists of: • 7% spoken words • 38% tone of voice • 55% body language © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 131. Implicit Language That Does Count• Punctuality • Eye contact• Courage to speak up * • Etiquette• Temperament • Greeting people *• Poise under stress • Smile or frown• Attentiveness • Physical energy• Courtesies, deference * • Use of profanity *• Attire, hats, tattoos • Off-color humor * * Words are secondary to the decision to use them © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 132. Multnomah Falls, Oregon by Dan Monnier The Myth of Cascading © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 133. Colorado River south of Lake Powell The Reality of Cascading © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 134. Which of these insightsstrike you as the mostpowerful or revealing?Why? What difference can itmake to you?
  • 135. As Business Changes . . .• Collapse of the “implied contract” and its benefits• Good staff jobs increasingly outsourced, even offshored• Globalization of markets and operations• Less reliance on organic growth, more M&As• Explosion of social media, blogging, texting• Powerful search engines compromise intellectual security• Nominal use of balanced scorecards, but P&L the big driver• Broader spans of control undermine traditional management• Six Sigma, ISO standards raise the bar on expectations © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 136. . . . So Must Communication• Must be an essential, integrated part of any business plan• Becomes the essential energy of leadership and thus key to change• Requires fundamental changes in mindset:  Not just burnishing a reputation, but also leading internal change  From „owning‟ communication to creating culture of communication  Involves working with messy, unintentional, implicit messages• Issue of accountability may be sensitive• Cascading must yield to rain forests of leadership communication © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 137. Wrong WayDon’t Make These Common Mistakes • Communication by a single announcement (invisible ink) • Lack of empathy for other points of view • Cliché-ridden visions, plastic or boilerplate values • Oversimplifying, tin ear for nuance and complexity • Failure to manage implicit communication you already own • Hoarding information in middle management • Lack of explanations, context, stories, metrics, metaphors • No effort to grasp and manage the metamessage © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • 138. Apply These Tests• Is it true? Is it real?• Does it matter? Is it relevant, specific, actionable?• Is it clear? Does it answer the questions it creates?• Is it timely? If late, does it explain why?• Is it participative and inclusive, a dialogue not a monologue?• Does it reflect your nobility and humanity?• Does it honor and validate the values you espouse? © Copyright 2012 Arceil Leadership Ltd. All rights reserved.