Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Military cdc for web
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Military cdc for web

431

Published on

1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
431
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Remind group that the visit to their base includes assessment of existing play equipment as well as opportunity to look at adding natural enhancements to their outdoor play areas. During visit want to make sure we capture your thoughts on how those might fit in your space with the children you serve.
  • We hear that children are becoming disconnected from nature. As we get started, I’d like for each of you to take a few minutes and share with the person next to you some of the reasons you believe this is happening. I’ll give you 2 minutes (or whatever time you wish to allow) to share your thoughts and listen to those of your neighbor. (After 2 minutes, allow a little time for a few participants to share what they heard with group.)
  • [discuss slide content]
  • All too often, this is the kind of outdoor environment where today’s children play. If children get outside for recess at all, their outdoor play space consists solely of plastic play equipment on asphalt or concrete…with nature a distant view outside a fence.
  • A more sedentary life style has also led to serious heath challenges for children. (Go through bullet points.)
  • The reason the Air Force is looking at nature enhancements for CDCs is due to the growing body of evidence on the positive benefits children gain from spending time in nature-rich outdoor spaces.
  • Research stat
  • Research stat
  • Research documents other great benefits children gain from playing outdoors in natural settings. (Go through list.) Nature benefits children physically, intellectually and emotionally.Taylor and Kuo are the source for the research on ADD
  • Research also documents the great benefits children gain from being outdoors. (Go through list.)Taylor and Kuo are the source for the research on ADDDr. Lars Bo Anderson is the source on physical exercise.
  • Our partner, Dimensions Educational Research Foundation, has spent over a decade conducting research on skills children gain in well-designed natural spaces. Those skills are listed in the more detailed print out sent to the base. (FYI – Those are in the small black folder with images mailed to the base with the Idea Books and DVD.)
  • The following slides of children illustrate some of the ways using experiences with the natural world as a daily part of learning can aid children’s healthy growth and development:(Child drawing)  This little boy is one of many children who are diagnosed each year with Attention Deficit Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Brett had the chance to move from a more traditional educational setting (where he spent most of his time indoors) to one that gave him a chance to learn with nature each day. The change in him was remarkable.  His ability to focus for longer periods of time improved, and his behavior in the indoor classroom became much calmer after having the chance to work in the outdoors.  Research shows that this result is true for many children with ADD or ADHD, and other special needs.
  • (This slide should be up on screen as the group arrives. Welcome group. If appropriate, make announcements specific to site and day’s agenda.Thank group for coming to learn and share ideas for how we can make nature an integral part of children’s daily lives. )
  • (Read quote.) Bringing nature to children’s daily lives…and to yours…can have a life changing benefit for children. As we visit each of your CDCs, we’ll look to you and your teams to let us know what natural enhancements you might wish to have created in a plan. Funding for creation of these spaces is not currently available from HQ, but they want to have basic plans in place should funding become available in the next year.
  • The reason the Air Force is looking at nature enhancements for CDCs is due to the growing body of evidence on the positive benefits children gain from spending time in nature-rich outdoor spaces.
  • We want to work with you and get your ideas for what Natural Enhancements work for you. One guideline to reference is the Learning With Nature Idea Book. Each CDC should have a copy. (CH2 - HAND OUT GUIDING PRINCIPLES SHEET). You might wish to jot notes on this sheet. These guiding principles incorporate concepts from Dimensions research and leading ASLA designers (American Society of Landscape Architects).
  • Along with the assessment of equipment you have the following options for adding nature to your CDC space….read slide details. To have a complete natural outdoor classroom, a site must either have 2500 or more square feet of natural space OR have an area where equipment is old and needs to replaced and they wish to replace it with nature.
  • If you have space for a complete natural outdoor classroom, here are the areas that would be included in the design. Note that Dimensions research and research by others shows the greatest skill development and decrease in behavioral issues takes place when children have a rich mix of natural activity areas that would be found in these complete natural outdoor classrooms. I’m going to show you some examples of these Recommended and Supplemental areas. Again, you might wish to jot notes on your sheet.
  • If you have space for a complete natural outdoor classroom, here are the areas that would be included in the design. Note that Dimensions research and research by others shows the greatest skill development and decrease in behavioral issues takes place when children have a rich mix of natural activity areas that would be found in these complete natural outdoor classrooms. I’m going to show you some examples of these Recommended and Supplemental areas. Again, you might wish to jot notes on your sheet.
  • In addition to clearly defined activity spaces, it is important to have an entry feature that provides a visual clue so children know they are entering a special place. This is especially important for children with sensory integration disorders.
  • Other recommended areas include…
  • An Open Area is important for children to have room for active physical play. (You can make the connection to the importance of active play in light of increased rates of obesity and diabetes, if time permits)
  • The complete outdoor classroom will also include areas for climbing and crawling. It can include a low level climbing structure consisting of low decks and ramps with vertical and horizontal rails for creative play and “drape and cover” activities.
  • These natural classrooms can incorporate existing manufactured climbing equipment as well. The climbing and crawling areas also can include elements for balance and agility that build body competence and body confidence.
  • These Natural Classrooms include areas where children can build with blocks. It is valuable to think about what you might be doing in the indoor classroom that can just as easily be done in the outdoor classroom. Building with natural blocks is one example. In the outdoors children have more room to build and the acoustics of blocks that fall is softened. Its important for children to build on flat surfaces but even a cut log can provide this type of hard, flat area.
  • A place for children for children to sketch and record their visual impressions strengthens their close observation skills and their ability to move from 3-dimensions to 2-dimensions. Plus, it helps them fully appreciate the beauty of nature.
  • “Messy Materials” area is a name given this space by children. It is an area piled deep with wood chips where children can dig and build with loose tree parts like large tree cookies or sections of stumps. It builds large muscle development and social skills as children work together to create forts or other structures.
  • Pairing the music and movement area is natural. Nature inspires creative movement with the rich patterns found in trees and plants, animals and insects, wind, water and weather. Concerns about noise are not as great outdoors. Movement triggers memory and helps children learn. An outdoor area where children can experiment with tonal and rhythm instruments and incorporate movement or dance is one more way children can fully use the outdoor space. Musical instruments are used that can be kept outdoors year round. A small stage can be a wonderful feature to include in the space.
  • Children can gain a great deal from any size garden, from large and spacious, to just a series of small planter boxes, as in this photo on the right.
  • These garden areas can be inspirational…
  • But perhaps, most importantly, when children are able to plant, care for and harvest a garden, they learn a sense of responsibility and often develop increased appreciation for eating fresh produce if vegetables or fruits are grown.
  • These outdoor classrooms can also include pathways through plantings. These areas are created by planting drought tolerant, native plant species (often grasses) on either side of a path. These pathways give children a “secret garden” feel, but still allow visibility of children by educators.
  • A gathering area provides a place large enough for an entire class to gather at one time. Here teachers can help children plan where they will spend their time and later regroup to share individual discoveries.
  • Do not underestimate the importance of outdoor storage. Children need easy access to loose materials like blocks, shovels or scarves… and adults need a way to store materials that doesn’t involve multiple trips back and forth from the indoors. Making materials readily accessible to children ensures a more complete learning experience. Simple open “cubbies” work well. If theft is a concern these storage shelves should have doors that fold back and latch open during the day and then unfold to lock at night.
  • The areas we just discussed are recommended areas that everyone can and should include for children. I’d like to now mention some supplemental areas that, while valuable for children, may be more difficult to implement than the recommended areas. One of these supplemental areas is a water area. Children love water…and it is a ideal element in locations with a hot climate. Hands-on activities allow children to experience and change the flow of water, discover that some objects sink and others float, or predict whether a leaf will be propelled down a waterway faster than a pine cone. Be sure that whatever way you choose to include water…the water does note stand for more than a few hours and is not deeper that regulatory codes for your region allow. A sand area provides children a tactile experience different from working with dirt or wood chips. Sand areas provide ideal settings for positive social interaction as children work together to create villages or canals. Digging in the soil release endorphins and is healthy for children…as well as adults. Providing an area where children can dig directly into soil and experience the rich feel and aroma of this life giving resource can be calming and beneficial to children. And a dirt digging area offers opportunities for children to discover tiny insects or earthworms in the soil.
  • Some early childhood programs have wheeled-toy areas or areas with swings which give children another chance to develop their large muscles. A separate area, away from the flow of the rest of the outdoor classroom areas is best for the wheeled toy area. Swings give children a sense of dynamic movement and moving through space. Swings also provide opportunities for children to work together to strengthen social skills. But swings take up a great deal of space on outdoor classrooms and require intense supervision, so are often not an ideal choice in many locations. Both these areas might exist OUTSIDE the natural classroom space. In cold climates a greenhouse extends learning and growing cycles. But greenhouses can be expensive and might be a place holder in your space rather than a design element.
  • The Child Saving Institute is an organization that serves at risk families and children. It is located along a busy street in the center of Omaha, Nebraska. Their original outdoor space consisted of one slide and one climbing structure…with no nature or greenery at all. After hearing about the research on the calming effects nature can have on children and families, the Institute determined they wanted to include a Nature Explore Classroom as part of their major renovation plan.
  • This is their site today…with more yet to be done. Their staff reported that this outdoor space has had a huge, positive impact on the children and families they serve. It has been so successful they are hoping to move the staging location for the construction equipment so the classroom can be completed sooner.
  • Here is an example of a complete Natural Outdoor Classroom…a Nature Explore Classroom at Hurlburt Field.
  • Some settings simply will not have room to incorporate all the elements of a complete Natural Classroom. Nature Nodes are a way that CDCs can incorporate some of the nature experiences for children if the space has lots of concrete or poured-in-place surfacing.
  • These “Nature Nodes” differ from complete natural outdoor classrooms. They are small, somewhat separated spaces often created by putting together various configurations of planter boxes to create little “nodes” that are separated by plant materials.
  • Some nature node examples include a gardening node…
  • A Gardening node design can also frame an area for sand or dirt digging.
  • A small deck surrounded by plant materials can create a building node where children can build on a table or a low flat surface.
  • In a similar way, a deck with a perimeter of planters creates a nook where children can interact with beautiful, natural materials to create 3 dimensional works of art.
  • Or a cozy nooks for gathering can also be created in a small natural space… (These arch configurations could also go over a wheeled toy track to bring a little nature to your space.)
  • A gathering node can be set directly over concrete, framed by planter boxes.
  • A node for music and movement might be a nature node for your CDC space if a full classroom won’t fit.
  • Nodes are also valuable in creating small natural areas for infants and pre-toddlers. Planter boxes can be used to add shade to your space or configured to give a shady area for a resting child.
  • A place for children for children to sketch and record their visual impressions strengthens their close observation skills and their ability to move from 3-dimensions to 2-dimensions. Plus, it helps them fully appreciate the beauty of nature.
  • A hard-surfaced area where children can build outside with natural wooden blocks is another recommended area. Outdoor spaces provide young children more room to experiment with block construction than most indoor spaces. And noise from falling block structures is absorbed outside in a way that is not possible indoors. Most children love to build with blocks, up through the elementary years, and these experiences strengthen visual-spatial, mathematical, and abstract thinking. Here are two examples of block areas. One area uses organic “tree blocks” made from pieces of tree branches. The other area contains rectangular blocks made from four different types of woods… with different colors, weights, patterns and smells. Notice how the “floor” surface differs and helps define each area.
  • The Nature Explore program has proven so effective in diverse settings because it is comprehensive and based on extensive research and field-testing. It involves not only helping organizations design effective outdoor spaces for children, but also provides workshops for educators to help them use these settings effectively, and family involvement materials. Certified Nature Explore Classrooms in all kinds of settingsWorkshops for Educators to help them use Nature Explore Classrooms effectively Family Involvement Materials to help engage families in understanding the importance of nature connectionsAll Nature Explore Programs are based on research
  • The third and final certification requirement is Family Involvement. Understanding the benefits their children gain from connecting with nature helps inspire families to spend time outdoors together. These shared outdoor experiences…away from television and video games… help children build strong emotional bonds to nature… and to the adults with whom they share their explorations. One resource that the Nature Explore program can provide to organizations is called Nature Explore Families’ Club, which provides a wealth of activities and ideas that families can use with their children as they explore the outdoors together.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Connecting Children
      With Nature
      Nature Enhancements for Your CDCs and Youth Center
    • 2. The Problem
      Children’s Growing
      Disconnection From Nature
    • 3. Children occupied with TV and video games
      Lack of access to green space
      Unrealistic worry about “Stranger Danger”
      Frightening media images or environmental problems causing “biophobia”
      Parent concern about children getting dirty
      The Problem: Causes
    • 4. The Problem: Causes
      Common outdoor play space for today’s children
    • 5. The Problem: Consequences
      • Obesity rates for U.S. children ages 6-11 have risen from 4% to 16% since 1971.
      • 6. The number of children on medications to treat ADHD has increased 100-fold in less than 50 years. (50,000 in 1960 and 6 million in 2003)
    • Researchby Dimensions Foundation and Others
      Benefits for Children from Spending
      Time in Nature-Filled Outdoor Spaces
    • 7. Nature buffers the impact of life stress on children and helps them deal with adversity. The greater the amount of nature exposure, the greater the benefits.
      (Wells 2003)
    • 8. Nature helps children develop powers of observation and creativity and instills a sense of peace and being at one with the world.
      (Crain 2001)
    • 9. Other Research Shows Children Benefit Greatly From Playing Outdoors in Natural Settings
      • Benefits include:
      Enhanced observation skills
      Improved concentration (especially beneficial for children with Attention Deficit Disorder - ADD)
      Greater recovery from cognitive fatigue
      Improved fine motor skills
    • 10. Other Research Shows Children Benefit Greatly From Being Outdoors
      Children who play outside:
      Get twice as much physical exercise
      • Have more friends
      Have better vision
    • 11. Children who spend time playing and exploring in well-designed Nature Explore Classrooms with nurturing adults develop valuable skills across all learning domains.
      (Miller 2007,
      Dimensions Foundation)
    • 12. Nature also Provides Special Benefits for Special Children
    • 13. Reconnecting the World’s Children to Nature
      National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education
      issued a Call to Action in 2008
      Calls upon families, educators and community leaders to make developmentally appropriate nature education a sustaining and enriching, fully integrated part of the daily lives and education of the world’s children.
    • 14. Organizations that Support Making Nature an Integral Part of Children's Daily Lives
    • 15. “Without continuous hands-on experience, it is impossible for children to acquire a deep intuitive understanding of the natural world.”
      Natural Learning, Creating Environments
      for Rediscovering Nature’s Way of Teaching
      - Robin C. Moore and Herb H. Wong,
    • 16. A Solution
      A National Initiative
      Create outdoor spaces that make nature part of children’s daily lives
    • 17. U. S. AIR FORCE
      Air Force is providing the opportunity for your Air Base Child Development Centers and Youth Centers to add natural enhancements to your outdoor play areas
      Photo - Hurlburt Field
    • 18. Adding Nature to Your Outdoor Space
      Help for creating a
      well-designed natural outdoor space.
      Learning With Nature Idea Book
      (Each CDC and Youth Center
      will receive a copy)
      Research-based, field-tested
    • 19. The Process
      CH2M Hill will call to schedule a visit
      Prior to the visit, packets of materials, including the Learning With Nature Idea Book and a DVD, will be sent to the base for CDC and YC advance review along with a pre-survey
      CH2M Hill and perhaps Dimensions Educational Research Foundation will visit your base. During that time they will conduct the following:
      • Short in-brief presentation
      • 20. One-hour orientation with CDC and YC staff about natural enhancements
      • 21. Outdoor space “walk through” with key staff to discuss and determine any natural enhancements (Options 1 or 2)
      • 22. Evaluation of existing playground equipment
      • 23. Short out-brief
      Follow up with base and HQ on evaluations & designs
    • 24. CDC Nature Enhancement Options
      If you wish to add Natural Enhancements you may choose:
      1. A Complete Natural Outdoor Classroom
      Research-based space
      Comprehensive space with multiple activity areas to meet all learners’ needs
      Need ~ 2000 sq. ft. or more of natural space
      OR
      2. Nature Nodes
      Single nature experience areas
      Nature Nodes are designed to fit into smaller natural areas or sit on concrete
    • 25. OPTION 1
      A Complete Natural Outdoor Classroom*
      Includes Recommended Areas:
      … and option of Supplemental Areas
      *Note: Research shows that the richest learning, greatest skill development, and decrease in behavioral issues takes place when children have a rich mix of activity areas found in a complete natural outdoor classroom.
    • 35. OPTION 1
      A Complete Natural Outdoor Classroom*
      Incorporates
      research-based, field-tested, Guiding Principles
      from the Learning With Nature Idea Book for creating your outdoor space.
      *Note: Research shows that the richest learning, greatest skill development, and decrease in behavioral issues takes place when children have a rich mix of activity areas found in a complete outdoor classroom.
    • 36. Guiding Principle 1
      Divide the space into clearly delineated areas
    • 37. Guiding Principle 2
      Include a complete mix of activity areas
    • 38. Guiding Principle 3
      Give areas simple names
    • 39. Guiding Principle 4
      Identify each area with a sign or visual clue
    • 40. Guiding Principle 5
      Be sure every area is visible at all times
    • 41. Guiding Principle 6
      Use a variety of natural materials
    • 42. Guiding Principle 7
      Choose elements for durability and low maintenance
    • 43. Guiding Principle 8
      Maximize beauty and visual clarity in the overall design
    • 44. Guiding Principle 9
      Personalize the design with regional materials and ideas from children and staff
    • 45. Guiding Principle 10
      Be sure the space meets all regulatory standards for your region
    • 46. Recommended Areas - Examples
      For Complete Natural Outdoor Classrooms
    • 47.
    • 48.
    • 49. Open Area
    • 50. Climbing Crawling Area
    • 51. Climbing Crawling Area
      Building body competence and body confidence
    • 52.
    • 53. Nature Art Area
    • 54. Nature Art Area
    • 55. Messy Materials Area
    • 56. Music and Movement Area
    • 57. Garden Area
    • 58. Garden Area
    • 59. Garden AreaHealthy Eating
    • 60. Pathway Through Plantings
    • 61.
    • 62.
    • 63. Supplemental Areas
      Water
      Sand
      Dirt-Digging
    • 64. Supplemental Areas
      Wheeled-Toy
      Dynamic Equipment including Swings
      Greenhouse
    • 65. Nature Enhancement Transformation Example
      Before
      Child Saving Institute
    • 66. Nature Enhancement Transformation Example
      After
      Child Saving Institute
    • 67. Military Impacted School
      Early Childhood Program
      Bellevue, NE
      (Serves Offutt AFB)
    • 68. Natural Outdoor Classroom Example Hurlburt Field Air Force Base Florida
    • 69. Natural Outdoor Classroom Example Hurlburt Field Air Force Base Florida
    • 70. Donna Love quote to follow
    • 71. A Certified Nature Explore Classroom
      Hurlburt Field Air Force Base Florida
    • 72. OPTION 1
      A Complete Natural Outdoor Classroom
      OUTCOMES
      • Your base will get a functional diagram and summary for each play area that incorporates a full natural outdoor space
      • 73. Design and summary will be used by HQ to request future funding for creating the natural outdoor space.
      Functional Diagram Example
    • 74. OPTION 2 Nature Nodes For CDCs wanting natural enhancements but with a smaller amount of natural space or lots of concrete or poured-in-place surfacing
    • 75. Nature Node example in a small natural area
    • 76. Nature Node design examples for sites with lots of concrete
    • 77. Nature Node Examples
      Gardening Node
    • 78. Gardening Nodes
    • 79.
      • Gardening Nodes
      • Garden Node, Sand or Dirt-Digging Node
    • Gardening/Dirt Digging Node
    • 80. Block Building Nodes
    • 81. Nature Art Nodes
    • 82. Gathering Node
    • 83. Gathering Nodes
    • 84. Music & Movement Node
    • 85. Music &
      Movement Nodes
    • 86. Music & Movement Nodes
    • 87. Dramatic Play Area
    • 88. Node for Infants & Pre-Toddlers
      Nature Node Examples
    • 89. OPTION 2
      Nature Nodes
      OUTCOMES
      • Your base will get requested Nature Node designs for each play area based on available space
      • 90. Design and summary will be used by HQ to request future funding for creating the Nature Node
      Nature Node design examples
    • 91. Examples of simple nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
    • 92. Examples of simple nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
    • 93. Examples of simple nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
      Toddler Shoe Garden
    • 94. Examples of simple nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
    • 95. Examples of simple nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
    • 96. Examples of nature componentsyour CDC can create on your own
    • 97. Helpful Community Resources
      Are you are a Tree City USA Base?
      Do you live by a Keep America Beautiful (KAB) community?
      If so, they may be able to help you…
      Obtain and replenish natural materials
      Find connections to
      reduced-price trees or plants
      Plant or care for trees or gardens
      Compile lists of native plants
      Offers a Tree City USA Growth Award opportunity for the Base
    • 98. Certified Nature Explore Classrooms
      Workshops for Educators
      Free Family Involvement Materials
      • All Nature Explore Programs are based on research by Dimensions Educational Research Foundation
    • Getting Families Involved
      Family involvement
      such as:
      Nature Explore
      Families’ Club
      Copy for each CDC
      All Nature Explore Programs are based on research
    • 99. Getting Families Involved
      Pizza Pavers
    • 100. "I think that playgrounds should be renamed ‘research environments.’ This is what the children are doing so vigorously. They are not just playing. They are finding out how the universe works.” - R. Buckminster Fuller

    ×