Developmental Advising: How to Put Heart, Courage, and Mind Into Your Advising Sessions!

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This was presented at the Texas Academic Advising Network (TEXAAN) State Conference - San Marcos, TX February 18, 2010.

This was presented at the Texas Academic Advising Network (TEXAAN) State Conference - San Marcos, TX February 18, 2010.

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  • 1. DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING: HOW TO PUT HEART, COURAGE AND MIND INTO YOUR ADVISING SESSIONS!
    Ashley Borniger and Ashley Ransom
    Texas Academic Advising Network Conference
    February 18, 2010
  • 2. OUTLINE
    Developmental Advising
    Student Development Theory
    Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development
    Schlossberg’s Transition Theory
    Discussion
    Questions
  • 3. DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING
    Definition
    “A systematic process based on a close student-advisor relationship intended to aid students in achieving educational, career, and personal goals through the utilization of the full range of institutional and community resources” (King, 2005).
    Purpose
    Help students become effective agents for their own lifelong learning and personal development (Hemwall & Trachte, 1999).
    Educate advisees about the purpose and meaning of the curriculum, instead of making course requirements seem meaningless or “forced” (Hemwall & Trachte, 1999).
  • 4. EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING
    Focus on students’ on-going needs over an extended period of time. One session builds upon another.
    Challenge students to achieve their learning potential and take academic risks.
    View students as active partners engaged in intellectual and personal growth.
    Help students think about and articulate what is important to them in their academic and personal lives.
    Set short-term as well as long-term goals, discuss ways to achieve those goals, and help monitor students’ progress in fulfilling those goals.
    Know and apply student development theory to advising sessions.
    (King, 2005)
  • 5. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    The seven vectors were first created in 1969 and were revised in 1993.
    Chickering used the term vectors of development because “each seems to have direction and magnitude – even though the direction may be expressed more appropriately by a spiral or by steps than by a straight line.”
    Students move through the vectors at different rates.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 6. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    The vectors can interact with one another.
    Students often find themselves reexamining previously worked through vectors.
    Although not rigidly sequential, the vectors do build on each other, lead to greater complexity, stability, etc.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 7. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector One: Developing Competence
    Includes three sub-levels:
    Intellectual Competence: Gain knowledge and skills related to a particular subject matter as well as increased skills in areas such as critical thinking and reasoning ability.
    Physical Competence: Comes from athletic and recreational activities, attention to wellness, and involvement in artistic and manual activities.
    Interpersonal Competence: Includes skills in communication, leadership, and working effectively with others.
    When all three are achieved, you have a “sense of competence.”
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 8. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Two: Managing Emotions
    Develop the ability to recognize and accept emotions as well as to appropriately express and control them.
    Students learn to act on feelings in a responsible manner.
    Includes emotions such as: aggression, sexual desire, anxiety, depression, anger, shame, guilt, caring, optimism, and inspiration.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 9. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Three: Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence
    Includes three sub-levels:
    Increased Emotional Independence: Defined as “Freedom from continual and pressing needs for reassurance, affection, or approval from others.”
    Develop Instrumental Independence: Includes self-direction, problem-solving ability and mobility.
    Interdependence: An awareness and acceptance of the importance of their interconnectedness with others.
    Chickering placed a greater emphasis on this vector in his revised edition by changing the name from “Developing Autonomy” to the current name.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 10. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Four: Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships
    Relationships contribute to the development of a sense of self.
    Development of intercultural and interpersonal tolerance.
    Respect differences and appreciate commonalities.
    Form healthy and lasting relationships with partners and close friends.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 11. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Five: Establishing Identity
    Acknowledge differences in identity development based on gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.
    Includes: comfort with appearance, comfort with gender and sexual orientation, sense of heritage, concept and comfort with roles and lifestyle, secure sense of self as perceived by significant others, self-esteem, and personal stability.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 12. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Six: Developing Purpose
    Develop clear vocational goals (paid or unpaid).
    Commit to specific interests and activities, even in the face of opposition.
    Lifestyle and family influences affect decision-making and goal-setting.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 13. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Vector Seven: Developing Integrity
    Establish a personal value system.
    Three stages:
    Humanizing Values: interests of others are balanced with one’s own interests.
    Personalized Values: core values are affirmed and beliefs of others are acknowledged and respected.
    Developing Congruence: self-interest is balanced with social responsibility.
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 14. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Mona Lisa Smile: Developing Purpose
    (Goldsmith-Thomas, Schindler, & Schiff, [Producers], & Newell, [Director], 2003)
  • 15. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Son In Law: Establishing Identity
    (Rotenberg & Lenkov, [Producers], & Rash, [Director],1993)
  • 16. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Dead Poets Society: Developing Competence
    (Haft, Junger-Witt, & Thomas, [Producers], & Weir, [Director], 2006)
  • 17. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT
    Discussion
  • 18. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Facilitates an understanding of adults in transition and leads them to the help they need to cope with ordinary and extraordinary life events.
    Transition is defined as “any event, or non-event, that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions, and roles.”
    Transition only exists if it is defined by the individual experiencing it.
    Transition may lead to growth, but the opposite is also possible.
    Four factors influence a person’s ability to cope with transition: Situation, Self, Support and Strategies. (More commonly known as the 4 S’s.)
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 19. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Situation
    Trigger
    Timing
    Control
    Role Change
    Duration
    Previous Experience with a Similar Transition
    Concurrent Stress
    Assessment
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 20. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Self
    Personal and Demographic Characteristics
    Socioeconomic Status
    Gender
    Age (psychological, not chronological)
    State of Health
    Ethnicity
    Psychological Resources
    Ego Development
    Optimism
    Commitment and Values
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 21. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Support
    Composed of three facets:
    Types
    Functions
    Measurements
    Four types of Social Support:
    Intimate Relationships
    Family Units
    Networks of Friends
    Institutions and Communities
    Functions of Support:
    Affect
    Affirmation
    Aid
    Honest Feedback
    Social Supports can be measured by identifying the individual’s:
    Stable Supports
    Supports that are to some degree role dependent
    Supports that are most likely to change
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 22. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Strategies
    Three coping response categories:
    Those that modify the situation
    Those that control the meaning of the problem
    Those that aid in managing the stress in the aftermath
    Four coping modes:
    Information seeking
    Direct action
    Inhibition of action
    Intrapsychic behavior
    (Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)
  • 23. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY
    Activity and Discussion
  • 24. QUESTIONS?
  • 25. REFERENCES
    Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S. & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.
    Goldsmith-Thomas, E., Schindler, D. & Schiff, P. (Producers), & Newell, M. (Director). (2003). Mona Lisa Smile [Motion picture]. United States: Revolution Studies.
    Haft, S., Junger-Witt, P., & Thomas, T. (Producers), & Weir, P. (Director). (2006). Dead Poets Society [Motion picture]. United States: Touchstone Pictures.
    Hemwall, M.K., & Trachte, K.C. (1999). Learning at the Core: Toward a new understanding of academic advising. NACADA Journal, 19(1), 5-11.
    King, M.C. (2005). Developmental academic advising. Retrieved from NACADA Clearinghouse of Academic Advising Resources Web site: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/ dev_adv.htm
    Rotenberg, M. & Lenkov, P.M. (Producers), & Rash, S. (Director). (1993). Son-in-Law [Motion picture]. United States: Hollywood Pictures.