DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING: HOW TO PUT HEART, COURAGE AND MIND INTO YOUR ADVISING SESSIONS!<br />Ashley Borniger and Ashley Ra...
OUTLINE<br />Developmental Advising<br />Student Development Theory<br />Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development<br />...
DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING<br />Definition<br />“A systematic process based on a close student-advisor relationship intended t...
EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING<br />Focus on students’ on-going needs over an extended period of time.  One session buil...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />The seven vectors were first created in 1969 and were revised in 1993. <b...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />The vectors can interact with one another.<br />Students often find thems...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector One: Developing Competence<br />Includes three sub-levels:<br />In...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Two: Managing Emotions<br />Develop the ability to recognize and a...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Three: Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence<br />Include...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Four: Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships<br />Relations...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Five: Establishing Identity<br />Acknowledge differences in identi...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Six: Developing Purpose<br />Develop clear vocational goals (paid ...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Seven: Developing Integrity<br />Establish a personal value system...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Mona Lisa Smile: Developing Purpose<br />(Goldsmith-Thomas, Schindler, &...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Son In Law: Establishing Identity<br />(Rotenberg & Lenkov, [Producers],...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Dead Poets Society: Developing Competence<br />(Haft, Junger-Witt, & Tho...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Discussion<br />
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Facilitates an understanding of adults in transition and leads them to the help they ...
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Situation<br />Trigger<br />Timing<br />Control<br />Role Change<br />Duration<br />P...
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Self<br />Personal and Demographic Characteristics<br />Socioeconomic Status<br />Gen...
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Support<br />Composed of three facets:<br />Types<br />Functions<br />Measurements<br...
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Strategies<br />Three coping response categories:<br />Those that modify the situatio...
SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Activity and Discussion<br />
QUESTIONS?<br />
REFERENCES<br />Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S. & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development 	in college: Theory, research, a...
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Developmental Advising: How to Put Heart, Courage, and Mind Into Your Advising Sessions!

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This was presented at the Texas Academic Advising Network (TEXAAN) State Conference - San Marcos, TX February 18, 2010.

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Developmental Advising: How to Put Heart, Courage, and Mind Into Your Advising Sessions!

  1. 1. DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING: HOW TO PUT HEART, COURAGE AND MIND INTO YOUR ADVISING SESSIONS!<br />Ashley Borniger and Ashley Ransom<br />Texas Academic Advising Network Conference<br />February 18, 2010<br />
  2. 2. OUTLINE<br />Developmental Advising<br />Student Development Theory<br />Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development<br />Schlossberg’s Transition Theory<br />Discussion<br />Questions<br />
  3. 3. DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING<br />Definition<br />“A systematic process based on a close student-advisor relationship intended to aid students in achieving educational, career, and personal goals through the utilization of the full range of institutional and community resources” (King, 2005). <br />Purpose<br />Help students become effective agents for their own lifelong learning and personal development (Hemwall & Trachte, 1999).<br />Educate advisees about the purpose and meaning of the curriculum, instead of making course requirements seem meaningless or “forced” (Hemwall & Trachte, 1999).<br />
  4. 4. EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENTAL ADVISING<br />Focus on students’ on-going needs over an extended period of time. One session builds upon another.<br />Challenge students to achieve their learning potential and take academic risks.<br />View students as active partners engaged in intellectual and personal growth.<br />Help students think about and articulate what is important to them in their academic and personal lives.<br />Set short-term as well as long-term goals, discuss ways to achieve those goals, and help monitor students’ progress in fulfilling those goals.<br />Know and apply student development theory to advising sessions.<br /> (King, 2005)<br />
  5. 5. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />The seven vectors were first created in 1969 and were revised in 1993. <br />Chickering used the term vectors of development because “each seems to have direction and magnitude – even though the direction may be expressed more appropriately by a spiral or by steps than by a straight line.”<br />Students move through the vectors at different rates.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  6. 6. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />The vectors can interact with one another.<br />Students often find themselves reexamining previously worked through vectors.<br />Although not rigidly sequential, the vectors do build on each other, lead to greater complexity, stability, etc. <br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  7. 7. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector One: Developing Competence<br />Includes three sub-levels:<br />Intellectual Competence: Gain knowledge and skills related to a particular subject matter as well as increased skills in areas such as critical thinking and reasoning ability. <br />Physical Competence: Comes from athletic and recreational activities, attention to wellness, and involvement in artistic and manual activities. <br />Interpersonal Competence: Includes skills in communication, leadership, and working effectively with others. <br />When all three are achieved, you have a “sense of competence.”<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  8. 8. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Two: Managing Emotions<br />Develop the ability to recognize and accept emotions as well as to appropriately express and control them.<br />Students learn to act on feelings in a responsible manner. <br />Includes emotions such as: aggression, sexual desire, anxiety, depression, anger, shame, guilt, caring, optimism, and inspiration.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  9. 9. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Three: Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence<br />Includes three sub-levels:<br />Increased Emotional Independence: Defined as “Freedom from continual and pressing needs for reassurance, affection, or approval from others.”<br />Develop Instrumental Independence: Includes self-direction, problem-solving ability and mobility. <br />Interdependence: An awareness and acceptance of the importance of their interconnectedness with others. <br />Chickering placed a greater emphasis on this vector in his revised edition by changing the name from “Developing Autonomy” to the current name. <br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  10. 10. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Four: Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships<br />Relationships contribute to the development of a sense of self.<br />Development of intercultural and interpersonal tolerance.<br />Respect differences and appreciate commonalities.<br />Form healthy and lasting relationships with partners and close friends.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  11. 11. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Five: Establishing Identity<br />Acknowledge differences in identity development based on gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.<br />Includes: comfort with appearance, comfort with gender and sexual orientation, sense of heritage, concept and comfort with roles and lifestyle, secure sense of self as perceived by significant others, self-esteem, and personal stability.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  12. 12. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Six: Developing Purpose<br />Develop clear vocational goals (paid or unpaid).<br />Commit to specific interests and activities, even in the face of opposition.<br />Lifestyle and family influences affect decision-making and goal-setting.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  13. 13. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT<br />Vector Seven: Developing Integrity<br />Establish a personal value system.<br />Three stages:<br />Humanizing Values: interests of others are balanced with one’s own interests.<br />Personalized Values: core values are affirmed and beliefs of others are acknowledged and respected.<br />Developing Congruence: self-interest is balanced with social responsibility.<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  14. 14. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Mona Lisa Smile: Developing Purpose<br />(Goldsmith-Thomas, Schindler, & Schiff, [Producers], & Newell, [Director], 2003)<br />
  15. 15. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Son In Law: Establishing Identity<br />(Rotenberg & Lenkov, [Producers], & Rash, [Director],1993)<br />
  16. 16. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Dead Poets Society: Developing Competence<br />(Haft, Junger-Witt, & Thomas, [Producers], & Weir, [Director], 2006)<br />
  17. 17. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT <br />Discussion<br />
  18. 18. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Facilitates an understanding of adults in transition and leads them to the help they need to cope with ordinary and extraordinary life events.<br />Transition is defined as “any event, or non-event, that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions, and roles.”<br />Transition only exists if it is defined by the individual experiencing it.<br />Transition may lead to growth, but the opposite is also possible.<br />Four factors influence a person’s ability to cope with transition: Situation, Self, Support and Strategies. (More commonly known as the 4 S’s.)<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  19. 19. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Situation<br />Trigger<br />Timing<br />Control<br />Role Change<br />Duration<br />Previous Experience with a Similar Transition<br />Concurrent Stress<br />Assessment<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  20. 20. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Self<br />Personal and Demographic Characteristics<br />Socioeconomic Status<br />Gender<br />Age (psychological, not chronological)<br />State of Health<br />Ethnicity<br />Psychological Resources<br />Ego Development<br />Optimism<br />Commitment and Values<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  21. 21. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Support<br />Composed of three facets:<br />Types<br />Functions<br />Measurements<br />Four types of Social Support:<br />Intimate Relationships<br />Family Units<br />Networks of Friends<br />Institutions and Communities<br />Functions of Support:<br />Affect<br />Affirmation<br />Aid<br />Honest Feedback<br />Social Supports can be measured by identifying the individual’s:<br />Stable Supports<br />Supports that are to some degree role dependent<br />Supports that are most likely to change<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  22. 22. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Strategies<br />Three coping response categories:<br />Those that modify the situation<br />Those that control the meaning of the problem<br />Those that aid in managing the stress in the aftermath<br />Four coping modes:<br />Information seeking<br />Direct action<br />Inhibition of action<br />Intrapsychic behavior<br />(Evans, Forney, & Guido-DiBrito, 1998)<br />
  23. 23. SCHLOSSBERG’S TRANSITION THEORY<br />Activity and Discussion<br />
  24. 24. QUESTIONS?<br />
  25. 25. REFERENCES<br />Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S. & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.<br />Goldsmith-Thomas, E., Schindler, D. & Schiff, P. (Producers), & Newell, M. (Director). (2003). Mona Lisa Smile [Motion picture]. United States: Revolution Studies. <br />Haft, S., Junger-Witt, P., & Thomas, T. (Producers), & Weir, P. (Director). (2006). Dead Poets Society [Motion picture]. United States: Touchstone Pictures.<br />Hemwall, M.K., & Trachte, K.C. (1999). Learning at the Core: Toward a new understanding of academic advising. NACADA Journal, 19(1), 5-11.<br />King, M.C. (2005). Developmental academic advising. Retrieved from NACADA Clearinghouse of Academic Advising Resources Web site: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/ dev_adv.htm<br />Rotenberg, M. & Lenkov, P.M. (Producers), & Rash, S. (Director). (1993). Son-in-Law [Motion picture]. United States: Hollywood Pictures.<br />

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