Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan

  • 784 views
Published

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
784
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. RESTRUCTURING FORUM THE TRUTH ABOUT HEDGE FUNDS PETER MORGAN ECO SECTION, EESC BRUSSELS 5 JULY 2010
  • 2. AGENDA • INVESTMENT COMMUNITY.  • GLOBAL FUND MANAGEMENT • SEEKING ALPHA. • FACTS AND FIGURES • LONDON MARKETS • HEDGE FUND STRATEGIES • SUB‐PRIME GREECE • FSA ASSESSMENT • SUMMARY
  • 3. Investment Community • CIFM Conventional Institutional Fund Managers Pension Funds, Insurance Funds, Mutual Funds • HNWI High Net Worth Individuals 8.6 million individuals having investable assets> $1 m • SWF Sovereign Wealth Funds Surplus funds of oil producing and Asian exporting  countries • AIFM Alternative Investment Fund Managers Hedge Funds, Private Equity, Venture Capital
  • 4. Global Fund Management Assets under management, $ trillion, 2007 2009 • CIFM Pension Funds 28.2 29.5 Mutual Funds 26.2 23.0 Insurance funds 19.9 20.0 • HNWI  High Net Worth Individuals 40.0 32.8 • SWF Sovereign Wealth Funds 3.3 3.8 • AIFM Hedge Funds 2.3 1.6 Private Equity 2.0 2.6 Source: International Financial Services Ltd, May 2010
  • 5. Seeking Alpha • HF returns, volatility and risk vary enormously. • Many funds hedge against market downturn. • Many deliver non‐market correlated returns. • Many aim for consistency of returns and capital  preservation, rather than magnitude of returns. • Managers are experienced, disciplined, diligent and  highly specialised; they co‐invest with clients. • Performance incentives attract the best brains.  • The Investment Community uses HF to minimize  overall portfolio volatility and enhance returns.
  • 6. HF Sources of Capital
  • 7. Facts and Figures 1 • 9,400 hedge funds world‐wide at December 2009. • About 5,000 Funds went out of business between  2000 and 2009 without any systemic risk or impact. • Funds are only a repository for cash and  investments. • Fund domicile: Cayman Islands 39%, Delaware 27%,  BVI 7%, Bermuda 5%, EU (Dublin and Luxembourg)  5%.  • Funds often operate in low tax environments but  managers and investors taxed by domicile regime. • Manager domicile: 68% US, 23% EU, 6% Asia.
  • 8. HF Investors by Country of Origin
  • 9. Facts and Figures 2 • Assets: NYC 41%, London 20% (75% of EU). • Average fees: 2% management, 20% performance. • Approx 20 Prime Brokers provide global custody,  securities lending, leverage financing, technology  and sometimes, administration. • About 40% Prime Brokerage based in London. • London concentration of EU Hedge Funds linked to  global importance of London equity, bond, currency  and commodity markets.
  • 10. London Markets 1 • Share of Global Equity Markets, 2009: US 32%, Jap 7%, UK 6%, DE 3%. • Foreign Equities Trading, 2009: London 17%, New York 31%, NASDAQ 41%. • International Debt Securities Market 2008: UK 29%, US 24%;    2009 UK 6%, US 30%. • Conventional Investment Fund Assets, 2009 US 50%, UK 9%, Jap 6%, FR 6%, DE 3%. • Hedge Fund Assets: US 41%, London 20% (75% of EU)
  • 11. London Markets 2 • OTC Derivatives, 2007: UK 42.5%, US 23.9%, FRA 7.2%, GER 3.7% • Exchange Traded Derivatives: 4 UK markets. • Foreign Exchange 2009:                                                            UK 36%, US 14%, JAP 6%, SIN 6%. • Commodities: 3 UK exchanges, 15% globally. • Bullion: Largest global OTC market is London. • Carbon and emissions trading: London is a leading  centre.
  • 12. Hedge Fund Strategies 1 Each of the 9,400 funds builds its unique strategy from a  number of different elements: • Style: global macro, equity hedge, event‐driven,  relative value (arbitrage), managed futures  • Market: equity, fixed income, commodity, currency • Instrument: long/short, futures, options, swaps • Exposure: directional, market neutral • Sector: emerging market, technology, healthcare etc. • Method: discretionary or systematic/quantitative • Diversification: multi‐manager,‐strategy, ‐fund, ‐ market
  • 13. Hedge Fund Strategies 2 The four main strategy groups are based on the investment style  and have their own risk and return characteristics. • Global macro funds attempt to anticipate global  macroeconomic events, generally using all markets and  instruments to generate a return. • Equity Hedge funds make hedged investments with exposure  to the equity market. • Event‐driven funds exploit pricing inefficiencies caused by  anticipated specific corporate events (special situations). • Relative value funds exploit pricing inefficiencies between  related assets that are mispriced (arbitrage). 
  • 14. Hedge Fund Strategies 3 • Global macro: discretionary or systematic; trend or counter  trend; commodities, currencies, equities. • Equity hedge: long/short, short bias, growth, value, sector  specific, quantitative directional. • Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations, activist,  private equity. These are the activities which directly impact enterprise. • Relative value: arbitrage, especially fixed income: sovereign  debt, corporate bonds, convertibles. • Fund of Funds: Conservative, diversified, defensive, strategic. ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ • Emergence of computer based Algorithmic trading and High  Frequency trading.
  • 15. Hedge Fund Strategies 4 • Macro Funds: The best known exponent is George Soros. • Equity Hedge: Alfred Winslow Jones created the first HF.  It used a long/short equity hedge scheme. $10,000  invested in 1949 grew to $480,000 by 1968. • Event Driven: HF played a decisive role in the acquisition  of Cadbury by Kraft. An activist HF provoked the break  up of ABN Amro. • Algorithmic: Renaissance Technologies Millenium fund  made 39% p.a. profit from 1989 to 2006. • High Frequency Trading:  73% of New York equity  trading is carried out by 2% of market traders.
  • 16. Sub‐Prime Greece • Greece has been in default for half its existence  as a nation. • June 1992: Bonds issued at 8.25%; spread +228 bp; deficit 11.5% GDP; debt to GDP 110%; S&P: BBB; onerous debt Ts & Cs, bonds governed by US/UK law. • June 2008: Bonds issued at 4.625%; spread +113 bp; deficit 5% GDP; debt to GDP 98%; S&P: A; debt Ts & Cs  relaxed, debt mainly governed by Greek law.  • Sub‐prime analogy: “Trashy debt is alchemised to gold  through manipulations driven by a political agenda”. • An EU enquiry into the trade in Greek bond related Credit  Default Swaps has apparently found no fault.
  • 17. FSA Assessment, Feb 2010 • Examined: 50 hedge funds, £ 300 billion assets, 20% global  industry plus 14 investment banks (prime brokers). • Concluded: HF do not pose a systemic risk. • HF do not pose a potentially destabilising credit counter party  risk:  ‐ maximum bank lending to one HF: $500m  ‐ maximum borrowing from all banks by one HF: $1billion. ‐ average borrowing: 202% of equity. • Maturity transformation results positive. • Prime brokers hold excess collateral.  • HF presence too small to threaten the system.  • In most asset classes, HF < 3% of market, < 1% EU equities.
  • 18. Summary Impact of Hedge Funds on Enterprise confined to: • Impact of Hedge Funds on Enterprise confined to: Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations,  Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations,  activist, private equity. activist, private equity. • Impact can be positive or negative.  Impact can be positive or negative.  • PE type reporting appropriate for social issues. Short selling is a legitimate strategy ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ • PE type reporting appropriate for employment issues. • Hedge funds pose little threat to financial system. Company Law issues need further consideration. • Short selling is a legitimate strategy Hedge funds pose no systemic risk to financial system. • FSA/IOSCO type reporting provides transparency Sophisticated investors do not need consumer  protection