Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Workshop Hedge Funds and Sovereign Wealth Funds - Morgan

802

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
802
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. RESTRUCTURING FORUM THE TRUTH ABOUT HEDGE FUNDS PETER MORGAN ECO SECTION, EESC BRUSSELS 5 JULY 2010
  • 2. AGENDA • INVESTMENT COMMUNITY.  • GLOBAL FUND MANAGEMENT • SEEKING ALPHA. • FACTS AND FIGURES • LONDON MARKETS • HEDGE FUND STRATEGIES • SUB‐PRIME GREECE • FSA ASSESSMENT • SUMMARY
  • 3. Investment Community • CIFM Conventional Institutional Fund Managers Pension Funds, Insurance Funds, Mutual Funds • HNWI High Net Worth Individuals 8.6 million individuals having investable assets> $1 m • SWF Sovereign Wealth Funds Surplus funds of oil producing and Asian exporting  countries • AIFM Alternative Investment Fund Managers Hedge Funds, Private Equity, Venture Capital
  • 4. Global Fund Management Assets under management, $ trillion, 2007 2009 • CIFM Pension Funds 28.2 29.5 Mutual Funds 26.2 23.0 Insurance funds 19.9 20.0 • HNWI  High Net Worth Individuals 40.0 32.8 • SWF Sovereign Wealth Funds 3.3 3.8 • AIFM Hedge Funds 2.3 1.6 Private Equity 2.0 2.6 Source: International Financial Services Ltd, May 2010
  • 5. Seeking Alpha • HF returns, volatility and risk vary enormously. • Many funds hedge against market downturn. • Many deliver non‐market correlated returns. • Many aim for consistency of returns and capital  preservation, rather than magnitude of returns. • Managers are experienced, disciplined, diligent and  highly specialised; they co‐invest with clients. • Performance incentives attract the best brains.  • The Investment Community uses HF to minimize  overall portfolio volatility and enhance returns.
  • 6. HF Sources of Capital
  • 7. Facts and Figures 1 • 9,400 hedge funds world‐wide at December 2009. • About 5,000 Funds went out of business between  2000 and 2009 without any systemic risk or impact. • Funds are only a repository for cash and  investments. • Fund domicile: Cayman Islands 39%, Delaware 27%,  BVI 7%, Bermuda 5%, EU (Dublin and Luxembourg)  5%.  • Funds often operate in low tax environments but  managers and investors taxed by domicile regime. • Manager domicile: 68% US, 23% EU, 6% Asia.
  • 8. HF Investors by Country of Origin
  • 9. Facts and Figures 2 • Assets: NYC 41%, London 20% (75% of EU). • Average fees: 2% management, 20% performance. • Approx 20 Prime Brokers provide global custody,  securities lending, leverage financing, technology  and sometimes, administration. • About 40% Prime Brokerage based in London. • London concentration of EU Hedge Funds linked to  global importance of London equity, bond, currency  and commodity markets.
  • 10. London Markets 1 • Share of Global Equity Markets, 2009: US 32%, Jap 7%, UK 6%, DE 3%. • Foreign Equities Trading, 2009: London 17%, New York 31%, NASDAQ 41%. • International Debt Securities Market 2008: UK 29%, US 24%;    2009 UK 6%, US 30%. • Conventional Investment Fund Assets, 2009 US 50%, UK 9%, Jap 6%, FR 6%, DE 3%. • Hedge Fund Assets: US 41%, London 20% (75% of EU)
  • 11. London Markets 2 • OTC Derivatives, 2007: UK 42.5%, US 23.9%, FRA 7.2%, GER 3.7% • Exchange Traded Derivatives: 4 UK markets. • Foreign Exchange 2009:                                                            UK 36%, US 14%, JAP 6%, SIN 6%. • Commodities: 3 UK exchanges, 15% globally. • Bullion: Largest global OTC market is London. • Carbon and emissions trading: London is a leading  centre.
  • 12. Hedge Fund Strategies 1 Each of the 9,400 funds builds its unique strategy from a  number of different elements: • Style: global macro, equity hedge, event‐driven,  relative value (arbitrage), managed futures  • Market: equity, fixed income, commodity, currency • Instrument: long/short, futures, options, swaps • Exposure: directional, market neutral • Sector: emerging market, technology, healthcare etc. • Method: discretionary or systematic/quantitative • Diversification: multi‐manager,‐strategy, ‐fund, ‐ market
  • 13. Hedge Fund Strategies 2 The four main strategy groups are based on the investment style  and have their own risk and return characteristics. • Global macro funds attempt to anticipate global  macroeconomic events, generally using all markets and  instruments to generate a return. • Equity Hedge funds make hedged investments with exposure  to the equity market. • Event‐driven funds exploit pricing inefficiencies caused by  anticipated specific corporate events (special situations). • Relative value funds exploit pricing inefficiencies between  related assets that are mispriced (arbitrage). 
  • 14. Hedge Fund Strategies 3 • Global macro: discretionary or systematic; trend or counter  trend; commodities, currencies, equities. • Equity hedge: long/short, short bias, growth, value, sector  specific, quantitative directional. • Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations, activist,  private equity. These are the activities which directly impact enterprise. • Relative value: arbitrage, especially fixed income: sovereign  debt, corporate bonds, convertibles. • Fund of Funds: Conservative, diversified, defensive, strategic. ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ • Emergence of computer based Algorithmic trading and High  Frequency trading.
  • 15. Hedge Fund Strategies 4 • Macro Funds: The best known exponent is George Soros. • Equity Hedge: Alfred Winslow Jones created the first HF.  It used a long/short equity hedge scheme. $10,000  invested in 1949 grew to $480,000 by 1968. • Event Driven: HF played a decisive role in the acquisition  of Cadbury by Kraft. An activist HF provoked the break  up of ABN Amro. • Algorithmic: Renaissance Technologies Millenium fund  made 39% p.a. profit from 1989 to 2006. • High Frequency Trading:  73% of New York equity  trading is carried out by 2% of market traders.
  • 16. Sub‐Prime Greece • Greece has been in default for half its existence  as a nation. • June 1992: Bonds issued at 8.25%; spread +228 bp; deficit 11.5% GDP; debt to GDP 110%; S&P: BBB; onerous debt Ts & Cs, bonds governed by US/UK law. • June 2008: Bonds issued at 4.625%; spread +113 bp; deficit 5% GDP; debt to GDP 98%; S&P: A; debt Ts & Cs  relaxed, debt mainly governed by Greek law.  • Sub‐prime analogy: “Trashy debt is alchemised to gold  through manipulations driven by a political agenda”. • An EU enquiry into the trade in Greek bond related Credit  Default Swaps has apparently found no fault.
  • 17. FSA Assessment, Feb 2010 • Examined: 50 hedge funds, £ 300 billion assets, 20% global  industry plus 14 investment banks (prime brokers). • Concluded: HF do not pose a systemic risk. • HF do not pose a potentially destabilising credit counter party  risk:  ‐ maximum bank lending to one HF: $500m  ‐ maximum borrowing from all banks by one HF: $1billion. ‐ average borrowing: 202% of equity. • Maturity transformation results positive. • Prime brokers hold excess collateral.  • HF presence too small to threaten the system.  • In most asset classes, HF < 3% of market, < 1% EU equities.
  • 18. Summary Impact of Hedge Funds on Enterprise confined to: • Impact of Hedge Funds on Enterprise confined to: Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations,  Event driven: distressed, merger, special situations,  activist, private equity. activist, private equity. • Impact can be positive or negative.  Impact can be positive or negative.  • PE type reporting appropriate for social issues. Short selling is a legitimate strategy ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ • PE type reporting appropriate for employment issues. • Hedge funds pose little threat to financial system. Company Law issues need further consideration. • Short selling is a legitimate strategy Hedge funds pose no systemic risk to financial system. • FSA/IOSCO type reporting provides transparency Sophisticated investors do not need consumer  protection

×