Ant Phillips and John Hosie WebSphere Message BrokerService Enablement for Mobile ApplicationsWorklight / WebSphere Messag...
Agenda Introduction to Worklight Worklight Adapters Message Broker Mobile Patterns    – Mobile enablement for Microsoft...
Introduction to Worklight                            © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Overview4                    © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Architecture5                        © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Overview6                    © 2012 IBM Corporation
Types of Mobile Application7                             © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Adapters                     © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Adapters Adapters provide the glue between Worklight and back-end applications    – Provides the extensibility ...
Worklight Adapters An adapter contains two files for configuration and implementation     – The first file is XML and con...
Invoking Worklight adapters Adapters are invoked from mobile applications using HTTP/JSON     – This convention makes Wor...
Worklight to Microsoft .NET                              © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight to Microsoft .NET Service Enablement Creates a mobile-ready service around a Microsoft .NET application     – G...
Configuring the Pattern Instance Pattern is configured with Microsoft .NET and Worklight information     – Server address...
Configuring the Microsoft .NET Assembly User-defined editor allows the pattern user to select their .NET assembly     – S...
Generated Message Broker Projects The pattern generates an application and a library     – Application contains the mecha...
Worklight Adapter Worklight adapter generated which reflects the web service methods     – Integrates the mobile applicat...
Mobile Application Pattern also creates a mobile application to test the Worklight adapter     – Each operation has views...
Mobile Application The mobile application has a single mobile web environment     – Application is best suited for browse...
Worklight Mobile Services                            © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Mobile Services Creates a mobile-ready interface around a Message Broker service     – Services are a first cla...
Configuring the Pattern Instance22                                 © 2012 IBM Corporation
Configuring the Pattern Instance The mobile service pattern can also be launched from the Navigator     – Intuitive user ...
Worklight Adapter Generates a Worklight adapter which reflects the web service methods     – Integrates the mobile applic...
Worklight Push Notifications                               © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Push Notification ServicesWorklight supports asynchronous push notifications to mobile applications     – Push ...
Worklight Push Notification Services Users receive notifications when the mobile application is not active     – Efficien...
Worklight Push Notification from WebSphere MQ Creates a push notification adapter from a WebSphere MQ queue     – Generat...
Configuring the Pattern Instance Pattern is configured with Worklight and Message Broker information     – Server address...
Worklight Adapter Worklight adapter generated which periodically checks for notifications     – Integrates Worklight with...
Worklight Resource Handler                             © 2012 IBM Corporation
Worklight Resource Handler Resource oriented architecture is a well known implementation pattern     – Provides a common ...
Implementing Resource Handlers Complete the pattern instance by implementing the resource handlers     – Subflows are gen...
WebSphere Extreme Scale (WXS) WebSphere Extreme Scale is tightly integrated with Message Broker     – Provides a highly s...
Authorization and Authentication Patterns provides a security model based around LDAP     – Caching fits perfectly with a...
Summary          © 2012 IBM Corporation
Service Enablement for Mobile Applications Message Broker provides a rich mobile experience     – Worklight patterns make...
38   © 2012 IBM Corporation
Message Broker    Patterns                 © 2012 IBM Corporation
The ChallengeFrom:                       MQ                WSDLTo:40                          © 2012 IBM Corporation
Patterns for Simplified Development      Creates top-down, parameterized connectivity solutions      Reduces common prob...
Built-In Patterns Message Broker provides a core set of built-in patterns These implement a variety of common scenarios ...
Message Broker Pattern Authoring                     © 2012 IBM Corporation
Pattern Authoring Patterns becomes even more compelling when you can create your own!     – Every organization has their ...
Create Your Working Solution No change at all - design your Message Broker solution as you do today     – Pattern authori...
Design Your Pattern Straightforward to create patterns using the Pattern Authoring editor!     – Design the user interfac...
Pattern Refinement Pattern authoring in Message Broker supports property changes     – Node, user-defined properties (UDP...
Message BrokerPattern Communities                      © 2012 IBM Corporation
Packaging a Pattern49                    © 2012 IBM Corporation
Pattern Communities Pattern authoring creates patterns whose value multiplies as they are  shared and used by a community...
Creating a Community Space51                           © 2012 IBM Corporation
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Mobile Patterns with WebSphere Message Broker

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  • Hello

    Hope you are doing well. Please let me know your availability. And please send me your updated resume ASAP. I would like to talk with you for this position.

    Position : IBM WebSphere Message Broker
    Location : Harrisburg, PA
    Duration : 12 Months +
    Interview Process: Phone and Skype interviews

    Skills:

    Experience using IBM WebSphere Message Broker
    • Message sets with COBOL copybooks and WSDL files
    • ESQL
    • XML concepts

    Proficient with WebSphere MQ
    Knowledge of DB2 and SQL concepts.
    Knowledge of XML
    Ability to perform work which requires a great deal of attention to detail.
    Proficient with OO concepts and how they apply to application design.

    Nice to have Experience:

    Familiar with SOAP Nodes, Http nodes, Files nodes in Broker a significant plus
    Familiar with SOAP and REST messaging concepts.
    Familiar with JMS concepts
    Familiar with SOA and SOA concepts
    Familiar with Mainframe/CICS/Cobol programming concepts
    Familiar with MQ Clustering, MQ Destination Lists.
    Familiar with MQ Broker as an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB)
    Proficient with using UML to communicate application design
    Knowledge of SOAP and web services.
    Familiar with JAVA/J2EE
    Familiar with Design Patterns and the application of Design Patterns using message flows such as Request-Reply, Composite message flows, Publish/Subscribe etc

    Interested consultants please send me your resume to nancy@aikoninc.com
       Reply 
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Mobile Patterns with WebSphere Message Broker

  1. 1. Ant Phillips and John Hosie WebSphere Message BrokerService Enablement for Mobile ApplicationsWorklight / WebSphere Message Broker © 2012 IBM Corporation
  2. 2. Agenda Introduction to Worklight Worklight Adapters Message Broker Mobile Patterns – Mobile enablement for Microsoft .NET applications – Create flexible mobile services on top of Message Broker – Resource management including security and caching – Outbound push notifications for asynchronous data delivery2 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  3. 3. Introduction to Worklight © 2012 IBM Corporation
  4. 4. Worklight Overview4 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  5. 5. Worklight Architecture5 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  6. 6. Worklight Overview6 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  7. 7. Types of Mobile Application7 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  8. 8. Worklight Adapters © 2012 IBM Corporation
  9. 9. Worklight Adapters Adapters provide the glue between Worklight and back-end applications – Provides the extensibility mechanism for Worklight to call out to back-end systems Worklight has two built-in interfaces that adapters can use (HTTP and SQL) – Worklight has client-side JavaScript APIs so that applications can invoke services – Likewise, server-side JavaScript APIs are available to implement procedures (adapters)9 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  10. 10. Worklight Adapters An adapter contains two files for configuration and implementation – The first file is XML and contains the overall metadata (procedure names, protocol etc) – Second file is JavaScript and contains one function (procedure) for each entry point Adapters are uploaded to Worklight Server ready for mobile applications – Once deployed, adapters are managed through the Worklight Console10 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  11. 11. Invoking Worklight adapters Adapters are invoked from mobile applications using HTTP/JSON – This convention makes Worklight adapters easy to test using web browsers – Client side applications use the XMLHttpRequest object for asynchronous calls – Mobile toolkits (JQuery, Dojo and Sencha) wrap this in a device independent layer11 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  12. 12. Worklight to Microsoft .NET © 2012 IBM Corporation
  13. 13. Worklight to Microsoft .NET Service Enablement Creates a mobile-ready service around a Microsoft .NET application – Generates a web service implementation which is deployed to Message Broker – Builds a Worklight integration adapter and a sample mobile application – Inbound data from the mobile application is sent to Worklight as JSON/HTTP – The adapter converts the JSON data into/from SOAP/HTTP for the .NET web service13 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  14. 14. Configuring the Pattern Instance Pattern is configured with Microsoft .NET and Worklight information – Server address is a key field as it is used to configure both ends of the connection! – Standard set of error handling and logging options are provided by the pattern – Adapter configured with the maximum number of concurrent (HTTP) connections – Once this limit is reached, Worklight will queue inbound requests from applications14 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  15. 15. Configuring the Microsoft .NET Assembly User-defined editor allows the pattern user to select their .NET assembly – Selection proceeds to a class and the (static) methods available in that class – Assembly can be developed in any .NET language (for example, VB.NET or C#) – Return value and parameters are reflected on and displayed by the user-defined editor15 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  16. 16. Generated Message Broker Projects The pattern generates an application and a library – Application contains the mechanics of the pattern instance – Library contains subflows for user customizations – Customizations are never deleted on re-generation! WSDL represents the selected .NET methods – One WSDL operation for each .NET (static) method – Likewise one message part defined per operation – WSDL types are defined in a separate XML schema file – WSDL and XSD are deployed directly to Message Broker16 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  17. 17. Worklight Adapter Worklight adapter generated which reflects the web service methods – Integrates the mobile application with the Message Broker .NET web service – One procedure is generated for each operation (method) on the web service – Adapter manages the conversion between JSON and SOAP/XML data formats – Adapter generated in a separate project so it can be deployed to Worklight Server17 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  18. 18. Mobile Application Pattern also creates a mobile application to test the Worklight adapter – Each operation has views (pages) to configure and invoke the back-end service – Application is built using Dojo Mobile (ensures it is device independent) – More information on the Dojo mobile toolkit here: http://dojotoolkit.org/features/mobile18 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  19. 19. Mobile Application The mobile application has a single mobile web environment – Application is best suited for browsers on small screen mobile devices – Easy to add extra environments for iOS, Android and many more! Android development requires a separate download (Android SDK) – Pick and choose your target Android versions from Android SDK Manager19 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  20. 20. Worklight Mobile Services © 2012 IBM Corporation
  21. 21. Worklight Mobile Services Creates a mobile-ready interface around a Message Broker service – Services are a first class artifact in Message Broker alongside applications and libraries – Builds an adapter to integrate Worklight and Message Broker services – Inbound data from the mobile application is sent to Worklight as JSON/HTTP– Makes it very simple to mobile enable a Message Broker service! – The adapter passes the inbound request straight through to the service – Pattern adds an HTTP/JSON message flow (binding) to the service project21 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  22. 22. Configuring the Pattern Instance22 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  23. 23. Configuring the Pattern Instance The mobile service pattern can also be launched from the Navigator – Intuitive user experience for mobile enablement of Message Broker services – The selected service name is passed to the pattern as the launch configuration – Pattern instance is configured automatically and can be immediately generated23 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  24. 24. Worklight Adapter Generates a Worklight adapter which reflects the web service methods – Integrates the mobile application with the Message Broker web service – One procedure is generated for each selected operation in the service – Request-response and one-way interactions for the service are supported24 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  25. 25. Worklight Push Notifications © 2012 IBM Corporation
  26. 26. Worklight Push Notification ServicesWorklight supports asynchronous push notifications to mobile applications – Push notifications have a measurable impact on the success of mobile applications – There are many IT challenges in supporting push notifications (devices, delivery etc)–Push notifications are applicable across many industry verticals – Healthcare, retail, travel, transportation, government, insurance and more!–All the major mobile platforms support push notification services – Apple iOS 3, Google Android 2.2, RIM Blackberry 5 and Windows Phone 726 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  27. 27. Worklight Push Notification Services Users receive notifications when the mobile application is not active – Efficiency gain as application does not need to issue constant queries – Saves battery life and also reduces network bandwidth (communication fees)– Notifications are not always appropriate and have disadvantages – Users need to subscribe on their device to receive push notifications – Notifications are limited in the size of their payload (for example, 256 bytes on iOS) – No quality of service is guaranteed and there is no delivery notification – No guarantee either that the end-to-end delivery chain is secure27 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  28. 28. Worklight Push Notification from WebSphere MQ Creates a push notification adapter from a WebSphere MQ queue – Generates a web service implementation which is deployed to Message Broker – Builds a Worklight integration adapter which polls for pending notifications – Pending notifications are written to a WebSphere MQ queue by a provider application – The adapter converts the notifications into JSON and arranges delivery to the mobile28 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  29. 29. Configuring the Pattern Instance Pattern is configured with Worklight and Message Broker information – Server address is a key field as it is used to configure both ends of the connection! – Standard set of error handling and logging options are provided by the pattern– Application specific fields can be delivered in the push notification – Configured as part of the pattern instance so that an accurate schema can be created29 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  30. 30. Worklight Adapter Worklight adapter generated which periodically checks for notifications – Integrates Worklight with a queue of notifications managed by Message Broker – Generated pattern instance project includes a schema for the notification messages – Adapter manages the conversion from XML to JSON for the Worklight server-side calls– Polling interval for pending notifications is configurable in the pattern – Adapter greedily processes all pending notifications each time it wakes up30 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  31. 31. Worklight Resource Handler © 2012 IBM Corporation
  32. 32. Worklight Resource Handler Resource oriented architecture is a well known implementation pattern – Provides a common set of functions (CRUD – Create Read Update and Delete) – This pattern provides an adapter which implements CRUD operations – A Message Broker service is generated with subflows for each operation – The service integrates security authorization and authentication (LDAP) – Operations optionally integrate with the Message Broker Global Cache (WXS)32 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  33. 33. Implementing Resource Handlers Complete the pattern instance by implementing the resource handlers – Subflows are generated for each CRUD operation in a customization project – Pattern generates a reference implementation of a back end system in ESQL Message Broker has excellent support for enterprise applications – Common design pattern to integrate with SAP, Siebel, JDEdwards and PeopleSoft – Wizards makes it easy to discover the application content (for example, SAP iDocs) – Rich SAP support includes iDocs, ALE, BAPI and query SAP tables (QISS)33 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  34. 34. WebSphere Extreme Scale (WXS) WebSphere Extreme Scale is tightly integrated with Message Broker – Provides a highly scalable, fault tolerant, elastic in-memory data grid – One or more execution groups manage a single logical cache of key-value data – WXS components are hosted within the execution group processes – Default scope is one cache per broker but this can be extended to multiple brokers– Vital for mobile applications where the number of devices can be huge – Caching fits perfectly with a CRUD model of many readers and (generally) few writers – Message Broker activity log shows the cache activity as CRUD operations complete34 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  35. 35. Authorization and Authentication Patterns provides a security model based around LDAP – Caching fits perfectly with a CRUD model of many readers and (generally) few writers – Users are authenticated using HTTP basic authentication by the HTTP Input node – Authorization is then done by splitting the users into two groups (readers/writers) – A user is authorized if they are a member of the group in the LDAP directory – The LDAP queries are issued by the message flow using the Security PEP node – Caching changes are made through WXS after the user has cleared security35 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  36. 36. Summary © 2012 IBM Corporation
  37. 37. Service Enablement for Mobile Applications Message Broker provides a rich mobile experience – Worklight patterns makes this integration quick and simple – Mobile service enablement is compelling with Message Broker Both inbound and outbound scenarios are provided – Mobile enablement for Microsoft .NET applications – Create flexible mobile services on top of Message Broker – Resource management including security and caching – Outbound push notifications for asynchronous data delivery Patterns address time-to-value for your solutions – It takes just a few minutes to create a pattern! – Why not create a patterns community in your organisation? Tell us what you need in Message Broker – we really do listen37 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  38. 38. 38 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  39. 39. Message Broker Patterns © 2012 IBM Corporation
  40. 40. The ChallengeFrom: MQ WSDLTo:40 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  41. 41. Patterns for Simplified Development  Creates top-down, parameterized connectivity solutions  Reduces common problems in flow development  Communicates best practices to the broker community  Reduces time-to-value for solution development  Complements regular solution development in broker41 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  42. 42. Built-In Patterns Message Broker provides a core set of built-in patterns These implement a variety of common scenarios – Web service front end to a MQ based application – Processing data stored in a file and routing to one or more queues – Adding a proxy in front of a web service provider – Processing data from an SAP system and routing to MQ – Shredding messages and routing to one or more queues Patterns are selected based on client feedback and field experience This core set of patterns continues to grow with each release42 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  43. 43. Message Broker Pattern Authoring © 2012 IBM Corporation
  44. 44. Pattern Authoring Patterns becomes even more compelling when you can create your own! – Every organization has their own repeating connectivity patterns! – Pattern authoring is the name we give to this technology in Message Broker We recommend you start with a working solution – One or more Message Broker projects Pattern authoring is a design activity – It may be long lived – It is often not sequential Using patterns is a top-down activity driven by a requirement, but: – Authoring a working solution is (typically) a bottom-up activity – So pattern authoring bridges these two different approaches Patterns have their own development cycle – Pattern Authoring editor supports this design activity44 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  45. 45. Create Your Working Solution No change at all - design your Message Broker solution as you do today – Pattern authoring does not change the tools you use to create solutions – The key to a good pattern is to create a good working solution!45 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  46. 46. Design Your Pattern Straightforward to create patterns using the Pattern Authoring editor! – Design the user interface which is presented to your pattern users – Easy to add branding - style sheets, images and other files as required46 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  47. 47. Pattern Refinement Pattern authoring in Message Broker supports property changes – Node, user-defined properties (UDPs) and promoted node properties Property variability is the most common type of variability that a pattern might need to express - there are many others: – Generate application text files such as ESQL scripts – Make structural changes to Message Flows – Create administration files such as MQSC scripts It is impossible to try and predict all the possible extensions that a pattern author might wish to implement In Message Broker we provide two ways to extend pattern authoring – Java code that is invoked when pattern instances are generated – PHP templates that generate text files in pattern instance projects47 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  48. 48. Message BrokerPattern Communities © 2012 IBM Corporation
  49. 49. Packaging a Pattern49 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  50. 50. Pattern Communities Pattern authoring creates patterns whose value multiplies as they are shared and used by a community of developers Public and private communities are equally interesting! A community needs to offer more than just a repository of assets! – Space for content such as patterns and subflow nodes – Forums to host discussions and threaded conversations – Categorisation is important as the community grows! (taxonomies) – Essential administrative functions such as user management – News articles and broadcasts keep the site fresh There are literally dozens of content management systems available On the commercial side we have tried Lotus Connections and Rational Asset Manager Open source projects such as Drupal and Joomla are compelling!50 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  51. 51. Creating a Community Space51 © 2012 IBM Corporation

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