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    Achievements Achievements Document Transcript

    • Achievements: CEO of PepsiCo; Ranked No.4 on Forbes magazines annual survey of the 100 most powerful women in the world.Indra Nooyi is the newly appointed CEO of PepsiCo-the worlds second-largest soft drink maker. She joins the select band ofwomen who head Fortune 500 companies. Presently, there are only 10 Fortune 500 companies that are run by women, and IndraNooyi is the 11th to break into the top echelons of power. Prior to becoming CEO, Indra Nooyi was President, Chief Financial Officerand a member of the Board of Directors of PepsiCo Inc.Indra Nooyi spent her childhood in Chennai. Her father worked at the State Bank of Hyderabad and her grandfather was a districtjudge. She did her BSc. in Chemistry from Madras Christian College and subsequently earned a Masters Degree in Finance andMarketing from IIM Calcutta. Indra Nooyi also holds a Masters Degree in Public and Private management from the Yale School ofManagement.Before joining PepsiCo in 1994, Indra Nooyi was Senior Vice President of Strategy and Strategic Marketing for Asea Brown Boveri,and Vice President and Director of Corporate Strategy and Planning at Motorola. She also had stints at Mettur Beardsell andJohnson & Johnson. At PepsiCo, Indra Nooyi played key roles in the Tricon spin-off, the purchase of Tropicana, the public offeringof Pepsi Cola bottling group and the merger with Quaker Foods.Indra Nooyi has been ranked No.4 on Forbes magazines annual survey of the 100 most powerful women in the world.Indra K. Nooyi BiographyAds by GoogleOnline Food Ordering - Food - Home Delivery and Pickups In Chandigarh, Mohali andPanchkula - www.jhatpatmenu.comJobs in Coca-Cola - 1000s of Jobs in Coca-Cola Submit your Resume Free. Now! -MonsterIndia.comBaby Care - Educational programme for mothers to take care of their little ones ! -www.StartHealthyStayHealthy.inGet 50Lac after 15Years. - Invest LIC 3600 p.m Plan -PolicyBazaar.com/2012_InvestmentsOpen Free* Sharekhan A/c - Low Brokerage Fee For Online Trading. Open Account Now! -www.Sharekhan.comOctober 28, 1955 • Madras, IndiaExecutive
    • Ads by GoogleGirls boarding schoolinternational girls schoolin DEHRADUN.9557291888www.ecoleglobale.comNew Batch for 2012-14Electronic Media & TV JournalimCall 099584-98880 for admit today.masscomedia.comBest Free Stock ChartsRealtime, 68 indicators, trendlinealerts, drawing tools, scans, Free!www.FreeStockCharts.comSr Jobs in Top CompaniesHigh Quality, Hand Screened Jobs inSales/Mktg/Finance/HR/Tech/TelecomHeadhonchos.com/India/RegisterTodayNooyi, Indra K..© Najlah Feanny/Corbis SABA.Indra K. Nooyi is the president and chief financial officer of PepsiCo. Best known for its Pepsi softdrinks, the international powerhouse that Nooyi oversees is actually one of the worlds largest snack-food companies. It makes and sells dozens of other products, including Doritos-brand chips, theTropicana juice line, and Quaker Oats cereals. Nooyi is one of the top female executives in the UnitedStates, and is also believed to be the highest-ranking woman of Indian heritage in corporate America.
    • Joined Rock BandNooyi was born in Madras, India, in 1955, and was a bit of a rule breaker in her conservative, middle-class world as she grew up. In an era in India where it was considered unseemly for young women toexert themselves, she joined an all-girls cricket team. She even played guitar in an all-female rockband while studying at Madras Christian College. After earning her undergraduate degree inchemistry, physics, and math, she went on to enroll in the Indian Institute of Management inCalcutta. At the time, it was one of just two schools in the country that offered a masters in businessadministration degree, or M.B.A.Nooyis first job after earning her degree was with Tootal, a British textile company. It had had beenfounded in Manchester, England, in 1799, but had extensive holdings in India. After that, Nooyi washired as a brand manager at the Bombay offices of Johnson & Johnson, the personal-care productsmaker. She was given the Stayfree account, which might have proved a major challenge for even anexperienced marketing executive. The line had just been introduced on the market in India, andstruggled to create an identity with its target customers. "It was a fascinating experience because youcouldnt advertise personal protection in India," she recalled in an interview with the FinancialTimes s Sarah Murray.Nooyi began to feel that perhaps she was underprepared for the business world. Determined to studyin the United States, she applied to and was accepted by Yale Universitys Graduate School ofManagement in New Haven, Connecticut. Much to her surprise, her parents agreed to let her moveto America. The year was 1978. "It was unheard of for a good, conservative, south Indian Brahmingirl to do this," she explained to Murray in the Financial Times. "It would make her an absolutelyunmarriageable commodity after that.""Behind my cool logic lies a very emotional person."Could Not Afford SuitNooyi quickly settled into her new life, but struggled to make ends meet over the next two years.Though she received financial aid from Yale, she also had to work as an overnight receptionist tomake ends meet. "My whole summer job was done in a sari because I had no money to buy clothes,"she told Murray. Even when she went for an interview at the prestigious business-consulting firmsthat hired business-school students, she wore her sari, since she could not afford a business suit.Recalling that the Graduate School of Management required all first-year students to take—andpass—a course in effective communications, she said in the Financial Times interview that what shelearned in it "was invaluable for someone who came from a culture where communication wasntperhaps the most important aspect of business at least in my time."
    • Pepsi v. CokeThe rivalry between Pepsi, the flagship product of Indra Nooyis company, and its Atlanta, Georgia-based competitor, Coca-Cola, is one of corporate Americas longest-running marketing battles. In theUnited States alone, the soft-drink industry is a $60 billion one, with the average Americanconsuming a staggering fifty-three gallons of carbonated soft drinks every year.The battle between Coke and Pepsi dates back almost as long as each companys history. Bothemerged as key players in early decades of the twentieth century, when soft drinks first came on themarket in the United States. In the 1920s, Coca-Cola began moving aggressively into overseasmarkets, and even opened bottling plants near to places where U.S. service personnel were stationedduring World War II. Pepsi only moved into international territory in the 1950s, but scored a majorcoup in 1972 when it inked a deal with the Soviet Union. With this deal, Pepsi became the firstWestern product ever sold to Soviet consumers.The battle for market share heated up after 1975, when both companies stepped up their alreadylavishly financed marketing campaigns to win new customers. Pepsis standard cola products had aslightly sweeter taste, which prompted one of the biggest corporate-strategy blunders in U.S.business history: in 1985, Coca-Cola launched "New Coke," which had a slightly sweeter formulation.Coke consumers were outraged. The old formula was still available under the name "Coca-ColaClassic," but the New Coke idea was quickly shelved. This incident is often studied by business-school curriculums in the United States and elsewhere, along with many other aspects of what isknown as "the cola wars."Coke is the leader in market share for carbonated colas, but soft drinks remain its core business.Pepsi, on the other hand, began acquiring other businesses in 1965 when it bought the Texas-basedFrito-Lay company, and has a larger stake in the food industry.Nooyi did not earn a second M.B.A. from Yale. Instead, her degree was a master of public and privatemanagement, which she finished in 1980. After commencement, she went to work at the BostonConsulting Group, a prestigious consulting firm. For the next six years she worked on a variety ofinternational corporate-strategy projects, and went over to Motorola in 1986 as a senior executive.She remained there for four years, leaving in 1990 to join Asea Brown Boveri Inc. as its head ofstrategy. ABB, as the company was known, was a $6 billion Swiss-Swedish conglomerate that madeindustrial equipment and constructed power plants around the world.Nooyis skill in helping ABB find its direction in North America came to the attention of Jack Welch,the head of General Electric. He offered her a job in 1994, but so did PepsiCo chief executive officerWayne Calloway. As she told a writer for Business Week, the two men knew one another, but
    • Calloway made an appealing pitch for Nooyis talent. He told her, she recalled, that "Welch is thebest CEO I know.... But I have a need for someone like you, and I would make PepsiCo a special placefor you."Nooyi chose the soft-drink maker, and became its chief strategist. Soon, she was urging PepsiCo toreshape its brand identity and assets, and became influential in a number of important decisions.She was also a lead negotiator on the high-level deals that followed. The company decided to spin offits restaurant division in 1997, for example, which made its KFC, Pizza Hut, and Taco Bell holdingsinto a separate company. She also looked at the successful plan by Pepsi rival Coca-Cola, which hadsold of its bottling operations a decade earlier, and had been rewarded with impressive profitmargins on its stock performance. Pepsi followed suit, and the 1999 initial public offering of thePepsi bottling operations was valued at $2.3 billion. The company kept a large share of stock in it,however.Pointed Pepsi in the Right DirectionAt PepsiCo, Nooyi has been the chief dealmaker for two of its most important acquisitions: she puttogether the $3.3 billion-dollar-deal for the purchase of the Tropicana orange-juice brand in 1998,and two years later was part of the team that secured Quaker Oats for $14 billion. That became one ofthe biggest food deals in corporate history, and added a huge range of cereals and snack-foodproducts to the PepsiCo empire. She also helped acquire the edgy beverage maker SoBe for $337million, and her deal beat the one submitted by Coca-Cola.Indra Nooyi (left) and other Pepsi-Co and Quaker Oats executives pose with productsfrom both companies. PepsiCo purchased Quaker Oaks in 2001.AP/Wide World Photo. Reproduced by permission.For her impressive dealmaking talents, Nooyi was promoted to the job of chief financial officer atPepsiCo in February of 2000. It made her the highest-ranking Indian-born woman among the ranksof corporate America. A year later, she was given the title of president as well, when her longtime
    • colleague, Steven S. Reinemund, advanced to the position of board chair and chief executive officer.Reinemund had said he would only take the job only if Nooyi came onboard as his second incommand. "I cant do it unless I have you with me," she recalled him telling her, accordingto Business Week.Upon taking over as president and chief financial officer in May of 2001, Nooyi worked to keep thecompany on track with her vision: "For any part of the day we will have a little snack for you," shetold Business Week in 2001. The company sold a dazzling range of snack foods and beverages, fromMountain Dew to Rice-a-Roni, from Captain Crunch cereal to Gatorade-brand sports drinks. It alsoowned the makers of Doritos-brand snacks and Aquafina bottled water.One of Corporate Americas Top VisionariesNooyis success in the business world landed her on Time magazines list of "Contenders" for itsGlobal Business Influentials rankings in 2003. Many watchers predict that she will someday headone of the companys divisions, such as Frito-Lay, or its core brand, PepsiCo Beverages NorthAmerica. In early 2004, there were mentions in the press that Nooyi, who still wears the occasionalsari to work, was being considered for the top job at the Gucci Group, but she denied rumors that shehad been talking with the Italian luxury-goods giant.Nooyi serves on the board of trustees at the Yale Corporation, the governing board of Yale University.She lives in Greenwich, Connecticut, not far from PepsiCos headquarters across the state line inPurchase, New York. At home, she maintains a puja, or traditional Hindu shrine, and once she flewto Pittsburgh after a tough session with Quaker Oats executives to pray at a shrine there to herfamilys deity. Her predictions that her American graduate education would hamper her marriageprospects proved untrue, for she married an Indian man, Raj, who works as a managementconsultant. They have two daughters who are nearly a decade apart in ages, and Nooyi occasionallybrings her younger child to work. The former rock guitarist is still known to take the stage atcompany functions to sing. Her job, however, remains a top priority. She watches championship-game replays of the Chicago Bulls to study teamwork concepts, for example, and admittedto Forbes journalist Melanie Wells that she strategizes 24-7 sometimes. "I wake up in the middle ofthe night," she told the magazine, "and write different versions of PepsiCo on a sheet of paper."For More InformationPeriodicalsKretchmar, Laurie. "Indra K. Nooyi, 35." Fortune (May 6, 1991): p. 112.
    • Murray, Sarah. "From Poor Indian Student to Powerful US Business-woman." FinancialTimes (January 26, 2004): p. 3."Nooyi Denies Gucci Talks." WWD (February 27, 2004): p. 2.Pandya, Meenal. "No Going Back: Indian Immigrant Women Shape a New Identity." World andI (May 2001): p. 204."A Potent Ingredient in Pepsis Formula." Business Week (April 10, 2000): p. 180."The Power of Two at Pepsi." Business Week (January 29, 2001): p. 102.Thottam, Jyoti. "The Iron Woman Is Ready to Rock." Time (December 1, 2003): p. 73."A Touch of Indigestion." Business Week (March 4, 2002): p. 66.Wells, Melanie. "A General in Waiting?" Forbes (January 20, 2003): p. 74.Ads by GoogleJobs In Infosys - Looking For Jobs In Infosys? Great Salary & Perks! Submit CV Now -www.Shine.com/Infosys_JobsGoogle Business Website - Easily Create A Website In 15 Mins. Free From Google To YourBusiness! - www.indiagetonline.inUser Contributions: 1medhaFeb 2, 2010 @ 2:02 amAs a career woman who has chosen to be a full time mom , i am in awe of you dear Indra Nooyi! I dontknow how you could mange both the home and the career front! As for me i had found it very difficult andnow continue to be a full time mom even after having left a job 8 years ago! Though cant say i regret it ilove and cherish every moment of my life with my daughter.All the best to you i will want my daughter to have you as her role model!medha
    • Read more: Indra K Nooyi Biography - life, family, parents, name, history, school, young, old,information, born, college http://www.notablebiographies.com/news/Li-Ou/Nooyi-Indra-K.html#b#ixzz1mbtJGgSUIndra NooyiFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Indra Nooyi. Nooyi at the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, January 2010 Born 28 October 1955 (age 56) Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India [1] Citizenship United States Alma mater Madras Christian College IIM Calcutta Yale School of Management
    • Occupation Chairman & CEO of PepsiCo Predecessor Steven Reinemund Religion Hindu Awards Padma Bhushan 2007Indra Krishnamurthy Nooyi (Tamil: ) (born 28 October 1955) is an Indian-bornAmerican business executive. She is the current Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of PepsiCo, the second largestfood & beverage business in the world (by net revenue). [2] According to Forbes, she is consistently ranked amongWorlds100 Most Powerful Women.[3] Contents [hide]1 Early life and career2 PepsiCo executive3 Compensation4 Honours, Awards and International Recognition5 Memberships and Associations6 Popular culture and shows7 Personal life8 Notes9 External links[edit]Early life and careerIndra Nooyi was born in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. She completed her schooling from Holy Angels AIHSS, Chennai. Shereceived a Bachelors degree in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics from Madras Christian College in 1974 and a PostGraduate Diploma in Management (MBA) from Indian Institute of Management Calcutta in 1976. Beginning her career inIndia, Nooyi held product manager positions at Johnson & Johnson and textile firm Mettur Beardsell. She was admittedto Yale School of Management in 1978 and earned a Masters degree in Public and Private Management. While at Yale, shecompleted her summer internship with Booz Allen Hamilton.[4] Graduating in 1980, Nooyi joined theBoston ConsultingGroup (BCG), and then held strategy positions at Motorola and Asea Brown Boveri.[5]
    • [edit]PepsiCo executiveNooyi joined PepsiCo in 1994 and was named president and CFO in 2001. Nooyi has directed the companys global strategyfor more than a decade and led PepsiCos restructuring, including the 1997 divestiture of its restaurants into Tricon, nowknown as Yum! Brands. Nooyi also took the lead in the acquisition of Tropicana in 1998,[6] and merger with Quaker OatsCompany, which also brought Gatorade to PepsiCo. In 2007 she became the fifth CEO in PepsiCos 44-year history.[7]According to BusinessWeek, since she started as CFO in 2000,[8] the companys annual revenues have risen 72%, while netprofit more than doubled, to $5.6 billion in 2006. [9]Nooyi was named on Wall Street Journal s list of 50 women to watch in 2007 and 2008,[10][11] and was listed among Time s100 Most Influential People in The World in 2007 and 2008. Forbes named her the #3 most powerful woman in2008.[12] Fortune ranked her the #1 most powerful woman in business in 2009 and 2010. On the 7th of October 2010 Forbesmagazine ranked her the 6th most powerful woman in the world. [13][14][edit]CompensationWhile CEO of PepsiCo in 2008, Indra Nooyi earned a total compensation of $14,917,701, which included a base salary of$1,300,000, a cash bonus of $2,600,000, stocks granted of $6,428,538, and options granted of $4,382,569. [15][edit]Honours, Awards and International RecognitionForbes magazine ranked Nooyi fourth on the 2008 and 2009 list of The Worlds 100 Most PowerfulWomen.[16] Fortune magazine has named Nooyi number one on its annual ranking of Most Powerful Women in business for2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010.[17][18][19][20] In 2008, Nooyi was named one of Americas Best Leaders by U.S. News &World Report.[21] In 2008, she was elected to the Fellowship of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[22]In January 2008, Nooyi was elected Chairwoman of the US-India Business Council (USIBC). Nooyi leads USIBCs Board ofDirectors, an assembly of more than 60 senior executives representing a cross-section of American industry.[23][24]Indra Nooyi has been named 2009 CEO of the Year by Global Supply Chain Leaders Group. [25]In 2009, Nooyi was considered one of "The TopGun CEOs" by Brendan Wood International, an advisory agency.[26][27] In2010 she was named #1 on Fortunes list of the "50 Most Powerful Women" and #6 on Forbes list of the "Worlds 100 MostPowerful Women".[28][29]After five years on top, PepsiCos Indian American chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi has been pushedto the second spot as most powerful woman in US business by Krafts CEO, Irene Rosenfeld.[30]Nooyi was named to Institutional Investors Best CEOs list in the All-America Executive Team Survey in 2008 to 2011.[31]Year Name Awarding organization Ref.
    • 2011 Honorary Doctor of Laws Wake Forest University. [32]2011 Honorary Doctor of Laws University of Warwick. [33]2011 Honorary Doctorate of Law Miami University. [34]2010 Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters Pennsylvania State University. [35]2009 Honorary Degree Duke University. [36]2009 Barnard Medal of Honor Barnard College.2008 Honorary Degree New York University. [37]2007 Padma Bhushan President of India. [38]2004 Honorary Doctor of Laws Babson College.[edit]Memberships and AssociationsIndra Nooyi is a Successor Fellow of the Yale Corporation.[39] She serves as a member of the Foundation Board of the WorldEconomic Forum, International Rescue Committee, Catalyst[40] and the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. She is also amember of the Board of Trustees of Eisenhower Fellowships, and has served as Chairperson of the U.S.-India BusinessCouncil.Indra Nooyi serves as an Honorary Co-Chair for the World Justice Project. The World Justice Project works to lead a global,multidisciplinary effort to strengthen theRule of Law for the development of communities of opportunity and equity.[edit]Popular culture and showsIndra Nooyi has also been mentioned in two episodes of the hit CW show, Gossip Girl, where one of the maincharacters, Blair Waldorf plans to get an internship under her.[41][edit]Personal lifeIndra Nooyi is married to Rajkantilal Nooyi. They have two daughters and reside in Greenwich, Connecticut.[42]
    • [edit]Notes 1. ^ The TIME 100 2. ^ "PepsiCo, Inc. (NYSE:PEP) : Second Quarter 2010 Earnings Preview".IStock Analyst. 15 July 2010. Retrieved 11 December 2010. 3. ^ Sellers, Patricia (2012-10-02). "Forbes Magazines List of The Worlds 100 Most Powerful Women". Forbes. 4. ^ Sellers, Patricia (2006-10-02). "Its good to be the boss". CNN. 5. ^ "Alumni Leaders - Indra Nooyi 80". Yale School of Management. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 6. ^ Levine, Greg (2006-08-14). "Power Women Member Nooyi To Lead Platinum Pepsi". Forbes. Retrieved 2007-09-10. 7. ^ "Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo, Named CEO of the Year by GSCLG". Marketwire. 2009-09-09. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 8. ^ "Forbes Profile: Indra Nooyi". Retrieved 2007-12-09. 9. ^ Brady, Diane (2007-06-11). "Indra Nooyi: Keeping Cool In Hot Water".BusinessWeek. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 10. ^ McKay, Betsy (2008-22-19). "The 50 Women to Watch 2007". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 11. ^ Crittenden, Michael R. (2008-11-10). "The 50 Women to Watch 2008". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 12. ^ The 100 Most Powerful Women, Forbes.com 13. ^ The 50 Most Powerful Women in Business, Fortune.com 14. ^ « The Worlds 100 Most Powerful Women », peoplestar.co.uk, Retrieved on 2010-10-11. 15. ^ 2008 CEO Compensation for Indra K. Nooyi, Equilar.com 16. ^ "The 100 Most Powerful Women: #3". Forbes. 2008-08-27. Retrieved 2008-08-27. 17. ^ "50 Most Powerful Women 2006: #1". CNN. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 18. ^ Benner, Katie; Levenson, Eugenia; Arora, Rupali. "50 Most Powerful Women 2007: #1". CNN. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 19. ^ Shambora, Jessica; Kowitt, Beth (2008-10-16). "50 Most Powerful Women 2008: #1". CNN. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 20. ^ Shambora, Jessica; Kowitt, Beth (2009-09-15). "50 Most Powerful Women 2009: #1". CNN. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 21. ^ "Americas Best Leaders: Indra Nooyi, PepsiCo CEO". Retrieved 2008-11-20. 22. ^ "Academy Announces 2008 Class of Fellows". American Academy of Arts & Sciences. 2008-04-28. Retrieved 2009-07- 09. 23. ^ "PepsiCo’s Indra K. Nooyi Elected Chairman of U.S.-India Business Council" (PDF) (Press release). U.S. Chamber of Commerce. 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 24. ^ "USIBC Leads U.S. Commercial Nuclear Executives to Help Implement Historic Nuclear Deal" (Press release). U.S. Chamber of Commerce. 2009-01-16. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 25. ^ India-born Indra Nooyi named CEO of the year 26. ^ The Markets Best Managers - Forbes.com, Forbes.com 27. ^ Brendan Wood International Announces 24 TopGun CEOs in the US, Reuters.com
    • 28. ^ Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/wealth/power-women. 29. ^ Shambora, Jessica; Kowitt, Beth (2010-09-30). "50 Most Powerful Women". CNN. 30. ^ "Indra Nooyi second most powerful woman in US business". Indiavision news. Oct. 1, 2011. 31. ^ The All-America Executive Team Best CEOs, InstitutionalInvestor.com 32. ^ "University of Warwick 2011: Citations for Medalists". 33. ^ "Miami University 2011: Citations for Medalists". 34. ^ "Pennsylvania State 2010: Citations for Medalists". 35. ^ "Duke University Commencement 2009: Citations for Medalists". 36. ^ "Barnard College Commencement 2009: Citations for Medalists". 37. ^ [|Tikku, Aloke] (2007-02-23). "Khushwant, Karnik, Nooyi, Remo, Mittal on Padma list". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 38. ^ "Babson College Commencement 2004: Citations for Medalists". 39. ^ "PepsiCo president Indra Nooyi elected to Yale Corporation". Yale Bulletin & Calendar. 30 August 2002. Retrieved 6 July 2009. 40. ^ "Board of Directors". Catalyst. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 41. ^ [1] 42. ^ Credeur, Mary Jane (15 August 2006). "Pepsis Indra Nooyi Led Non-Soda Growth; Women CEO Exemplar". Bloomberg, L.P.. Retrieved 17 August 2011.[edit]External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Indra Nooyi PepsiCo corporate biography Forbes Profile: Indra Nooyi The Pepsi Challenge, profile Indra Nooyi (Fortune) Reference for Business: Indra Nooho Leadership Biography Video of discussion with Indra Nooyi at the Asia Society, New York, 4/14/2009 Wikinews has related news:PepsiCo names Nooyi CEO as Reinemund retires Preceded by Chairwoman and CEO of PepsiCo Succeeded by Steven Reinemund 2006 – Present Incumbent
    • [show] v d e PepsiCo Inc. View page ratings Rate this page Whats this? Trustworthy Objective Complete Well-written I am highly knowledgeable about this topic (optional) Submit ratings Categories: 1955 births Living people Tamil businesspeople American people of Indian descent American people of Tamil descent Madras Christian College alumni Indian Institute of Management Calcutta alumni Yale School of Management alumni PepsiCo people Boston Consulting Group people Recipients of the Padma Bhushan American Hindus Indian emigrants to the United States
    • Indian chief executivesIndian women in businessPeople from Chennai Log in / create accountArticleTalkReadEditView historyMain pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaInteractionHelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact WikipediaToolboxPrint/exportLanguages‫ال عرب ية‬Bân-lâm-gúDeutschEspañolFrançaisItalianoРусскийTürkçeУкраїнська中文This page was last modified on 9 February 2012 at 17:03.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of use for details.Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
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