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Assignment #3 amendolara & gorosito Document Transcript

  • 1. INSPT – UTN ICT Applied to English Teaching – 2010 Lecturer: Ledesma, Paula Students: Amendolara, Vanina and Gorosito, Marina Unit 3 Assignment #3: Internet-based Project Work The evaluation of each of the websites to be used in this assignment appears at the end of this file. Level: Upper-intermediate – Advanced Topic: Fairy-tale parodies Lesson 1 – Webquest A. Warmer: T will ask questions such as the following so as to activate S’s schemata on the topic of recitals: Do you know what “recitals” are? Have you ever prepared one? When? Did you like it? Do you like acting? Do you like recitals? Do you enjoy reading plays? Etc. B. Web section: S will do the webquest (link: http://zunal.com/webquest.php?w=72093), which includes: - An interview with a scriptwriter. S will do a note-taking exercise. Then, they will share the most important parts they consider the scriptwriter has said. Link to the interview: TheDialogue (Poster) Tricks of the trade [Video] (2007, September 20). Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=YkHk4V3w7ow&feature=related - Watching examples of parodies: 1. Barry Josephson (Producer) Disneyconline (Poster) Enchanted Trailer [Video] (2007, October 27) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zpo7nEc5FHg. 2. Zzaylin (Poster) "Black Snow" a parody of snow white [Video] (2009, December 16) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwyMikHuFa4. - Reading a short script and some reviews on it. 1. Script: Icarus Plays (2010) Bang Bang You're Dead Play. Read Play | Icarus Plays by William Mastrosimone. Retrieved from: http://www.icarusplays.com/preview-plays/ bbyd/read-play. 2. Reviews: Icarus Plays (2010) Bang Bang You're Dead Play Reviews. Reviews and Testimonials | Icarus Plays by William Mastrosimone. Retrieved from: http://www.icarusplays.com/preview-plays/bbyd/reviews-testimonials. - Final task: Writing a review for the parody of Snow White S have already seen.
  • 2. C. What next stage: Brainstorming of some ideas related to the writing of scripts such as: the three main parts (setting-conflict-resolution), the visual structure (e.g.: stage directions, objects, etc.), etc. Lesson 2 A. Warmer: T will draw on S’s ideas of the previous lesson and she will ask S about fairy tales and the ways in which they can be parodied. She will also ask S to give examples (e.g. Shrek). B. Web section: - Complete the following extract with the correct tenses. The aim is for S to review tenses before plunging into the final task of this project (writing a script). This extract has been taken from the following source: Playscripts, Inc. (2001) Rapunzel Uncut by Mariah Everman. Retrieved from: http://www.playscripts.com/playview.php3?playid=68: NARRATOR 1. Once upon a time in a land far, far away there _______________ (1- live) a good man and his wife. (NARRATOR 2 comes out.) NARRATOR 2. Whoa, wait a minute. NARRATOR 1. What? NARRATOR 2. Is that the best you can do? I mean no offense, but all fairy tales _______________ (2- start) out with “Once upon a time”—where’s the originality? NARRATOR 1. I’m trying to tell the story of Rapunzel, do you mind? NARRATOR 2. Oh, that one. Let me tell you, they got that story all wrong. NARRATOR 1. Well maybe you would like to tell it? NARRATOR 2. No, you just keep on going and I’ll tell you when you make a mistake. NARRATOR 1. Great, anyway as I was saying: Once upon a time in a land far, far away there lived a good man and his wife. They _______________ (3- live) in a quaint little house in the country. It was a nice house except for one small problem. (TOWNSPEOPLE cross stage.) TOWNSPERSON 1. Did you hear about the witch? TOWNSPERSON 2. No, what? TOWNSPERSON 1. Well it seems that she _______________ (4- move) in right next to the quaint little house in the country. NARRATOR 1. That’s right, the witch had moved in right next door. TOWNSPERSON 2. No, next to those two dear people? TOWNSPERSON 1. Yes. TOWNSPERSON 2. Do you think we should warn them? TOWNSPERSON 1. I’m sure they already know. NARRATOR 2. See, like that, why _______________ people _______________ (4- always/think) witches are bad? NARRATOR 1. It’s a fairy tale—all witches are bad in fairy tales, now pay attention.
  • 3. NARRATOR 2. Sorry. TOWNSPERSON 2. Oh look, here comes the man of the house. (FATHER comes on.) TOWNSPERSON 2. Excuse me sir, but did you know that the witch just moved in next door to you? FATHER. Which witch? TOWNSPERSON 2. The witch. FATHER. You mean the witch with the stitch? TOWNSPERSON 1. No, he _______________ (5- mean) the witch with the itch, not the witch with the stitch. FATHER. Oh, you mean the rich witch? TOWNSPERSON 2. No, she fell in a ditch. FATHER. Well which witch is which? I mean, which witch is the witch next door? TOWNSPERSON 1. The horrible mean witch who grows radishes. FATHER. Oh, that witch. TOWNSPEOPLE. YES, that witch! FATHER. Oh my, I better get home and tell my wife. She loves radishes, which is a problem because of the witch, I mean…oh, never mind. NARRATOR 2. Man, who wrote this stuff! (FATHER and TOWNSPEOPLE go off.) NARRATOR 1. So he rushed home where he found his precious wife, who at the time was pregnant with their first child. (MOTHER comes on, sitting in a chair. FATHER rushes in, out of breath.) NARRATOR 2. Pregnant? This woman looks like she swallowed a car. (Goes over to FATHER:) What did you do, lose a bet? What are you having, a child or a litter? Holy hot wings, girl, call Jenny Craig! NARRATOR 1. Can we continue? NARRATOR 2. Yeah, but after the show this girl needs to call Richard Simmons or something. - Carry out the following vocabulary exercise (a printer will be needed unless S copy and paste the text on a Word document): (Source: Googledocs (2010) rapunzel_vocabulary.doc. Retrieved from: http://docs.google.com/viewer? a=v&q=cache:WOmNQ3Ss48kJ:www.thechildrenstheatre.com/pdfs/2004_rapunzel_gen _vocabulary.pdf+rapunzel+vocabulary+activity&hl=es&gl=ar&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjmtr V06aYvmGO2lJ4KO9k- Ybqujz4xYAdexXBx3HERPcqOlswR119VYU_AWXsNnP2Tdt49pdFNf6SCyGOOSdJq6GOAe1 MA3ztTor4Gr-T4h1P9kqyLcBmBaEk0VQONtfxRab2a&sig=AHIEtbRHJJ_ebw5bWoNn4) - Insert the following “stage directions” in the correct places:  (As the MOTHER is saying her lines, she chases the FATHER in her rolling chair)  (Panting)  (Pause)  (Still panting)
  • 4. (This extract has been taken from the following: Playscripts, Inc. (2001) Rapunzel Uncut by Mariah Everman. Retrieved from: http://www.playscripts.com/playview.php3?playid=68) FATHER. (___:) I…witch…move…witch… (___.) MOTHER. What are you saying? (___.) I sent you out to get some chicken wings, now where are they? FATHER. (___:) Forgot…witch…help… MOTHER. You forgot! Do I look like I kin git up and gittem myself? I’m having a baby here! I knew I shoulduh written it on your forehead. Men, humph. FATHER. We have to move, a witch just moved in next door. MOTHER. A witch! Which witch? C. What next stage: T will hand out different cards with the name of a famous fairy tale and a specific situation in that fairy tale. The idea is that S, in small groups (2-4 students), write about possible ways to parody those situations. Lesson 3 A. Warmer: S’s groups will exchange the parodies they have invented the previous lesson (in the “What next stage”) and each group will have to review them. B. Web section: -. There is no need to use the Internet in this lesson as S will be writing their scripts. However, S will be able to write their parodies in a Word document as it is a powerful and very helpful program for everyone to use when writing. They can even use the spell-checker and the facility that enables users to make comments on texts. The rubric for the activity is: Work in groups of approximately 10 people. Create the layout/ draft and then the script of the play. Consider the following: - Setting - Characters - Conflict - Reactions - Visuals - Sound - Objects Split the work. When you act the play out, you all have to fulfill different roles within the group such as: director, costume designer, sound engineer, set designer, prompter, actors. C. What next stage: Evaluation of the written scripts taking into account language, grammar, spelling, coherence, plot elements, etc. Then S will be asked to act the scripts out at the end of the year.
  • 5. Evaluation of websites 1. TheDialogue (Poster) Tricks of the trade [Video] (2007, September 20). Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=YkHk4V3w7ow&feature=related. Evaluation: • As regards accuracy, the person that is speaking, Billy Ray, is an expert scriptwriter; he has written or co-written the screenplays for several fims like Color of Night, Volcano and Hart's War. • Currency: The page was last updated in 2007. • Content: It is an interesting topic to discuss because the speaker talks about his inspiration to write scripts from movie soundtracks, about taking acting lessons, etc. • As regards functionality, the site works pretty well (especially if you have a high speed Internet connection). 2. Barry Josephson (Producer) Disneyconline (Poster) Enchanted Trailer [Video] (2007, October 27) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zpo7nEc5FHg. Evaluation: • Accuracy: Enchanted is a film which draws on several fairy tales. All of them are parodied. • As regards currency, the webpage was last updated in 2007. • Content: It is an interesting trailer to watch and analyze with students because they will then have to write a fairy tale spoof. • As regards functionality, the site works pretty well (especially if you have a high speed Internet connection). 3. Zzaylin (Poster) "Black Snow" a parody of snow white [Video] (2009, December 16) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwyMikHuFa4. Evaluation: • As regards accuracy: This movie correctly portrays the way in which a fairy tale parody can be acted out in a recital. • Currency: The webpage was last updated in 2009. • Content: It is a stimulating video because students will have to act the play out at the end of the year. • Functionality: The site works pretty well (especially if you have a high speed Internet connection). 4. Icarus Plays (2010) Bang Bang You're Dead Play. Read Play | Icarus Plays by William Mastrosimone. Retrieved from: http://www.icarusplays.com/preview-plays/bbyd/read- play. Evaluation: • Accuracy: This webpage contains the original script of the play Bang Bang You’re Dead, which is intended to be played out in schools across America.
  • 6. • Currency: The content is up-to-date. • Content: It is a good play to see the structure of a script. • Functionality: The site works well, it loads quickly. Another advantage is that the play can be read for free. 5. Reviews: Icarus Plays (2010) Bang Bang You're Dead Play Reviews. Reviews and Testimonials | Icarus Plays by William Mastrosimone. Retrieved from: http://www.icarusplays.com/preview-plays/bbyd/reviews-testimonials. Evaluation: • Accuracy: The reviews were written by people who performed or saw the play, so students will be provided with different viewpoints as regards the criticisms to this play. • As regards currency, the webpage was last updated in 2003. • Content: It is an interesting site to read reviews on the play students have just had a look at. • As regards functionality, the website works well, it loads quickly. 6. Playscripts, Inc. (2001) Rapunzel Uncut by Mariah Everman. Retrieved from: http://www.playscripts.com/playview.php3?playid=68. Evaluation: • Accuracy: The play has been written by Mariah Everman, a scriptwriter who took up this activity in 2000. • Currency: The content is up-to-date. • Content: Some extracts of the play have been adapted twice to suit pedagogical purposes: 1) to make students go over tenses and 2) to make them deal with stage directions, an often neglected part of scripts. • Functionality: The site works well, it loads quite quickly. It does not require the use of plug-ins such as Flash. 7. Googledocs (2010) rapunzel_vocabulary.doc. Retrieved from: http://docs.google.com/viewer? a=v&q=cache:WOmNQ3Ss48kJ:www.thechildrenstheatre.com/pdfs/2004_rapunzel_gen_v ocabulary.pdf+rapunzel+vocabulary+activity&hl=es&gl=ar&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjmtrV06a YvmGO2lJ4KO9k- Ybqujz4xYAdexXBx3HERPcqOlswR119VYU_AWXsNnP2Tdt49pdFNf6SCyGOOSdJq6GOAe1M A3ztTor4Gr-T4h1P9kqyLcBmBaEk0VQONtfxRab2a&sig=AHIEtbRHJJ_ebw5bWoNn4 Evaluation: • Accuracy: The activities were intended for native speakers of English as they were created by the “Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati”, a company that introduces young audiences to the performing arts through professional, fully-staged productions that appeal to parents and educators while teaching morals and values in the USA. • As regards currency, the webpage was last updated in 2009. • Content: The layout is quite sober, but easy to understand. • As regards functionality, the website works well, it loads quickly.