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Introduction to infinitives and gerunds
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Introduction to infinitives and gerunds

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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO INFINITIVES AND GERUNDS
  • 2. THE INFINTIVE IS “TO” For example: THE BASE FORM, OR to goDICTIONARY FORM OF to be to study THE VERB: to think
  • 3. ForTHE GERUND IS THE example: goingBASE FORM OF THE being VERB + “-ING”: studying thinking
  • 4. A GERUND IS A KIND OF NOUN. IT CAN OFTEN BE THE SUBJECT OF A SENTENCE:For example:Fishing is my favorite thing to do on theweekend.Learning English is hard.Working in the hot sun is always exhausting.
  • 5. AN INFINITIVE CAN SOMETIMES BE THE SUBJECT OF A SENTENCE, BUT THIS IS FORMAL AND OLD FASHIONED:For example:To err is human. (This an old proverbmeaning that it is natural for people tomake mistake.)To be or not to be is the question. (Famousline from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.)
  • 6. NOTICE THE NEGATIVE FORMS OF A GERUND OR INFINITIVE:For example:To be or not to be is the question.Not using your seat belt isdangerous.
  • 7. A GERUND CAN BE THE OBJECT OF A PREPOSITION, BUT AN INFINITIVE CANNOT:For example:We are thinking about going to SanFrancisco this weekend.Last night I went out with friendsinstead of studying.
  • 8. BOTH A GERUND AND AN INFINITIVE CAN BE THE OBJECT OF A VERB:For example:I don’t like to drive on the freeway.I don’t like driving on the freeway.
  • 9. BUT THE RULES FOR GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES AS OBJECTS ARE COMPLICATED AND DIFFICULT.
  • 10. THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT WHEN YOU MAKE MISTAKES WITH INFINITIVES AND GERUNDS AFTER A VERB, EVERYBODY KNOWS WHAT YOU MEAN—YOU JUST SOUND A BIT FOREIGN.
  • 11. WE WILL WORK ON GERUNDS AND INFINTIVES LITTLE BY LITTLE.For now, study these links on the Moodlesite:Slide Show: Gerunds and Infinitives AfterVerbsOnline Grammar Handout: Gerunds andInfinitives After Verbs