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Comparison essay notes Comparison essay notes Presentation Transcript

  • Comparison Essays Some problems many students are having:
  • Problem #1 General Statements about People or Things
  • Use the plural noun with no article OR a + singular noun (same meaning) http://www.govloop.com/forum/topics/do-working-women-in-washington-d-c-receive-equal-opportunities
  • Nowadays, a woman’s role and position has changed OR Nowadays, women’s roles and positions have changed.
  • A woman in the 1980’s earned less money, and a woman now earns more. OR Women in the 1980’s earned less money, and women now earn more.
  • Problem #2 Overstatement!! (Image: http://howtospendit.ft.com/womens-fashion/14641-the-artof-overstatement)
  • For example: “In this century, the breadwinners are women.”
  • **“In this century, the breadwinners are women.” This means that ALL breadwinners are now women! (Not true!)
  • **“In this century, the breadwinners are women.” It means that NO men have jobs any more! (Not true!)
  • You mean: In this century, more women are becoming breadwinners. OR In this century, many women are breadwinners. OR In this century, more women are breadwinners than in the past.
  • Problem #2 Overstatement!! (Image: http://www.realifexhousewife.com)
  • For example: “**Women’s role was always equal to housewives.” NOT TRUE!
  • Even 100 years ago, when MOST women were housewives, not ALL women were housewives! Left: 19th-century nuns: http://www.phatmass.com/phorum/topic/112134-old-habitsdie-hard page-2#.Um10Oxbvw6U. Right: 19th-century prostitutes: http://samanthabvance.wordpress.com/presentation-page/
  • You mean: A woman’s role has traditionally been a housewife. OR Most women have usually been housewives. OR A housewife has always been a woman’s traditional role.
  • For example: “Today, most women are highly educated and occupy high-paid jobs.”
  • Overstatement!! (Image: http://www.bloggernews.net/116430)
  • **“Most modern women are highly educated and occupy high paid jobs.” “Most” means 90-95%, or almost all. That is not true!
  • **“Most modern women are highly educated and occupy high paid jobs.” Today, lot of women are not highly educated.
  • **“Most modern women are highly educated and occupy high paid jobs.” Today, lot of women occupy lowpaid jobs.
  • You mean: Today, more women are highly educated and occupy high-paid jobs than in the past. OR Today, more and more women are becoming highly educated and occupying high-paid jobs.
  • Problem #3: Don’t “dump” a quotation! Image: http://www.outcropacres.net/autos/dumptruck.htm
  • Your reader needs to know: Who said this? Why are you quoting it?
  • Your quote is the filling in a “sandwich”! Quotation
  • For example: According to Dennis Cauchon, author of a USA Today article about rolereversal, “ … wives outearn their husbands Quote 28% of the time when both work, up from 16% 25 years ago.” This figure tells us that American families are depending more on a wife’s income.
  • Normally, we do not begin or end a paragraph with quotation marks!
  • Problem #4 Be sure that you understand the two things you are comparing!
  • 1953 2013 Images (1) : http://social.rollins.edu/wpsites/thirdsight/2013/04/12/support-troops-the-role-of-the-housewife-in-the (2) http://www.thejfblogit.co.uk/2011/11/02/making-meetings-work/
  • 1983 Images (1) http://www.julieanewell.com/schoolsecretary.htm/ (2) http://www.thejfblogit.co.uk/2011/11/02/making-meetings-work/ 2013
  • 1863 Images (1) http://www.fashion-era.com/mid-late_victorian_fashion.htm (2) http://www.thejfblogit.co.uk/2011/11/02/making-meetings-work/ 2013
  • A Very Quick History of Women in the U.S. (Similar in Canada, Europe and Australia)
  • American women  @ 1860 • No vote • Few property rights • No good jobs • Few rights to divorce.
  • American women  @ 1860 If you were: Rich Middle Class Poor Your husband or father decided everything. Your servants did all the work. You wore beautiful clothes and did almost nothing. You were a housewife. Probably you also helped with your family’s farm or business. The man in your life was boss. You were a servant, a slave or a prostitute, or maybe a factory worker. Your life was very, very hard.
  • American women @ 1860  1920 • No vote: trying to get the vote • Increasing property rights • A few more jobs • College education for a few women • Some rights to divorce.
  • American women @ 1860 1920 If you were: Rich Middle Class Your husband or father decided almost everything. Your servants did all the work. Maybe you got some education, but you did not work. You were a housewife. If your husband or father had a store of business, maybe you helped out. If you were single, you could work as a teacher, Poor You were a servant or a prostitute, or very likely a factory worker. Your life was very hard.
  • American women1920  1970 • • • • • • Got the vote in 1920. Equal property rights. Education increasingly equal to men. Lots of jobs, but usually less pay than men. Divorce became easier and more common. Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination
  • American women @ 1920 1970 If you were: Rich You could decide most things about your life. Your servants did some of the work. You had an excellent education, but you only had a job if you wanted one. Middle Class You finished high school, and often went to college. Before you got married, you probably worked as a teacher, nurse or office worker. After you got married, you were probably a housewife. Poor You worked at a low-paying job. Your life was hard.
  • American women1970  Now • • • • • • Equal rights under the law. Education equal or higher than men. More and more equality in job opportunities. Equal employment rights under law, but income gap remain Divorce becomes very common. Most married women work outside the home.
  • American women @ 1970 Now If you are: Rich You decide everything about your life. You have some paid household help. You have an excellent education and probably a highpaying job— maybe you make more than your husband. Middle Class Poor You probably go to college and maybe to graduate school. Your job opportunities are more an more similar to a man’s, but still not completely equal. You probably work after you are married. Maybe you are the breadwinner or make more than your husband. You work at a lowpaying job. Your life is hard (harder than 50 years ago)! Wages for low-level jobs are lower now, adjusted for inflation. If you have a husband, he may be out of work—for poor people, men’s jobs have been hit harder than women’s.
  • “An American role-reversal: Women the new breadwinners” (2013) is about a very specific new phenomenon. Photo: Janice Burton for the U.S. Army http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/24/female-breadwinners/2015559/
  • This article describes how the percentage of women who are primary breadwinners for their families is increasing. Photo: Janice Burton for the U.S. Army http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/24/female-breadwinners/2015559/
  • For example, the percentage of families in which the wife is the breadwinner increased from 6% in 1988 to 23% in 2010. Photo: Janice Burton for the U.S. Army http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/24/female-breadwinners/2015559/
  • BUT remember that these families are STILL the minority! If the wife is the major breadwinner in 23% of families, that means that in 77% of families, it is still the husband. Photo: Janice Burton for the U.S. Army http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/24/female-breadwinners/2015559/