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3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
3 kinds of clauses
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3 kinds of clauses

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  • 1. + THREE KINDS OF CLAUSES ADJECTIVE, ADVERB, AND NOUN CLAUSES
  • 2. + ADJECTIVE CLAUSES = RELATIVE CLAUSES
  • 3. + Examples of adjective clauses in “My Long Distance Life”: I was born in Berkeley, where I lived in a small house in the hills surrounded by firs and redwoods. One friend whose dad moved to New Hampshire sees him at Christmas and for one month during the summer.
  • 4. + Some adjective clauses have a comma before them: I was born in Berkeley, where I lived in a small house in the hills surrounded by firs and redwoods. Some adjective clauses do not: One friend whose dad moved to New Hampshire sees him at Christmas and for one month during the summer. We will study this problem later in the semester.
  • 5. + An adjective clause usually follows a noun. It modifies the noun that it follows. I was born in Berkeley, where I lived in a small house in the hills surrounded by firs and redwoods. One friend whose dad moved to New Hampshire sees him at Christmas and for one month during the summer. .
  • 6. + Words used as relative pronouns to begin adjective clauses: that which who whose whom when where
  • 7. + An adjective clause cannot change its position in the sentence: Correct: One friend whose dad moved to New Hampshire sees him at Christmas and for one month during the summer. Incorrect (and make no sense): **One friend sees him whose dad moved to New Hampshire at Christmas and for one month during the summer. **One friend sees him at Christmas and for one month during the summer whose dad moved to New Hampshire.
  • 8. + ADVERB CLAUSES = SUBORDINATE CLAUSES
  • 9. + Examples of adverb clauses in “My Long Distance Life”: When I was 12 and on my way to L.A. for Christmas, a lady refused to check her bag and shoved a flight attendant. I couldn't join them because I had to fly to L.A. As the school year came to a close, I began to shut down.
  • 10. + An adverb clause = a subordinate clause (two words for the same thing) When I was 12 and on my way to L.A. for Christmas, a lady refused to check her bag and shoved a flight attendant. I couldn't join them because I had to fly to L.A. As the school year came to a close, I began to shut down.
  • 11. + An adverb clause, or subordinate clause modifies the verb in the main clause: When I was 12 and on my way to L.A. for Christmas, a lady refused to check her bag and shoved a flight attendant. I couldn't join them because I had to fly to L.A. As the school year came to a close, I began to shut down.
  • 12. + An adverb clause, or subordinate clause begins with a subordinator = subordinating conjunction = adverbial expression
  • 13. + There are many of these! Here are just a few: before, after, because, if, as, when, while, as soon as, whenever …
  • 14. + An adverb clause can be the first or second half of the sentence. Notice how the punctuation changes, however: The writer dreaded flying because several bad things had happened to him on the plane. Because several bad things had happened to him on the plane, the writer dreaded flying.
  • 15. + NOUN CLAUSES
  • 16. + Examples of noun clauses in “My Long Distance Life”: Everyone said I'd spend time with both parents, but I wanted to know where I would live. It wasn't that I didn't want to see my mom and stepdad.
  • 17. + A noun clause can do all the same jobs in a sentence that a noun does.
  • 18. + It can be the subject of a verb: Where he would live was the problem that worried him.
  • 19. + It can be the object of a verb: Everyone said I'd spend time with both parents, but I wanted to know where I would live.
  • 20. + It can be the object of a preposition: I worried about where I would live.
  • 21. + It can be the complement of a linking verb: It wasn't that I didn't want to see my mom and stepdad.
  • 22. + It can be the complement of an adjective: It is too bad that his mother moved to Los Angeles.

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