Sociodynamic Counselling

1,351 views
1,238 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,351
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
56
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Sociodynamic Counselling

  1. 1. SocioDynamic Counselling Theory and Practice Kai Koivumäki [email_address] June 2006 Vilnius
  2. 2. What is counselling? <ul><li>” Counselling is the skilled and principled use of relationships which develop self-knowledge, emotional acceptance and growth, and personal resources. The overall aim is to live more fully and satisfyingly. Counselling may be concerned with addressing and resolving specific problems, making decisions, coping with crises, developing personal insight and knowledge, working through feelings and inner conflicts, or improving relationships with others. </li></ul><ul><li>The counsellor’s role is to facilitate the client’s work in ways that respect the client’s values, personal resources, and capacity for choice within his or her cultural context.” (British Association for Counselling) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Guidance To promote the client’s ability to improve his or her life by means of dialogue. The goals are based on the preferences expressed by the client. Advice To give the client advice about a proper procedure to meet his or her needs. Information To provide the client with the information he or she needs. Goals
  4. 4. Phases of counselling in Finland <ul><li>Psychometric phase in the mid-1950`s; differential psychology, differences between individuals, testing </li></ul><ul><li>Clinical-diagnostic phase from 1950-1960; methods of counselling from clinical psychology </li></ul><ul><li>1960-65: Ego ja self-theories (Rogers), personality was the key element, psychometric approach no more important </li></ul><ul><li>Therapy orientation at the end of 1960, emphasise a psychogist as a professional, methods: ability, personality, and interest testing </li></ul>
  5. 5. ...phases <ul><li>Consultative phase, 1960-70: attention on group and consultative methods. Communication and group theory. Later psycho- and sociodrama </li></ul><ul><li>New professionalism, 1977: periods of life and development task/life period. Cognitive learning theories and sociodrama </li></ul><ul><li>New phase ongoing, change of paradigm </li></ul><ul><ul><li>changes in the labour market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>lifelong learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>unclear and dusty future </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>multiform careers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>constructivist perspective </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. CAREERS AND VOCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRIAL WORKLIFE A) Relationship to work: permanent jobs, static, vocational/professional development straightforwarded: PHASE, CLEARNESS, LONG WORK HISTORIES, SAME EMPLOYER POST INDUSTRIAL WORKLIFE SECOND MODERN B) Relationship to work: flexible, continuous professional development, not straightforwarded ei-suoraviivainen; development is continuous discontinuous progressive stopping rational irrational harmonious unexpected FROM A CLEAR CAREER TO RISK MANAGEMENT, MISTINESS and INDIVIDUAL PATHS ?
  7. 7. System theory Linguistics Existential philosophy Active Engagement /counselling /Amundson Cognitive theory, Constructivist approach, Social constructivism SocioDynamic NLP Solution focused theory Appreciative inquiry Narrative thinking Humanistic psychology Cultural perspective Equity, uniqueness
  8. 8. Vance Peavy’s life story <ul><li>Born in 1929, Colorado Rockies, USA </li></ul><ul><li>Worked at the family farm and other ranches for 18 years, took care of sheep, 15 years in construction and steel mill work </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult family situation, left home at age 14, lived with a neighbour ”Auntie” and ”Uncle” John (Indian) </li></ul><ul><li>Studied and got his first job as a counsellor in 1954 </li></ul><ul><li>Worked as a school counsellor for 10 years, studied and completed his doctorate in counselling psychology at the University of Oregon 1965 </li></ul><ul><li>Worked as a counsellor, teacher, therapist and researcher </li></ul>
  9. 9. Vance Peavy’s life story <ul><li>Moved to Canada in 1967, found a job at the University of Victoria (Vancouver), developed the training of employment counsellors in Canada, established Canada’s national counselling journal </li></ul><ul><li>Director of a research project 1988-1992 (examined all current counselling methods, began to create a new form of counselling </li></ul><ul><li>Retired in 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>Continued to research, mentor, train and write </li></ul><ul><li>Had lots of courses in Canada, Portugal, Sweden, Finland and Denmark </li></ul><ul><li>Died in July 2002 </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>SOCIODYNAMIC COUNSELLING IS: </li></ul><ul><li>A. PERSPECTIVE ON CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL LIFE AND THE NATURE OF </li></ul><ul><li>SELF </li></ul><ul><li>B. A PHILOSOPHY OF HELPING </li></ul><ul><li>C. A SET OF COUNSELLING CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES </li></ul><ul><li>BASED ON A & B ABOVE </li></ul><ul><li>SOCIODYNAMIC PERSPECTIVE, PHILOSOPHY, AND PRACTICE COMBINE IN A </li></ul><ul><li>HOLISTIC FASHION TO HELP PEOPLE SEEK ANSWERS TO THE QUESTION: </li></ul><ul><li>HOW SHOULD I LIVE MY LIFE? </li></ul><ul><li>Across a wide range of concerns, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employment and job seeking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Career choice and development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace adjustment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training and education questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relationship conflict and repair </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social problems </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Some concepts <ul><li>Socio – dynamic </li></ul><ul><li>Autobiographical self </li></ul><ul><li>Self/Identity </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-voiced self </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Co-construction, joint action </li></ul><ul><li>Guided participation </li></ul><ul><li>Mindful problem-solving </li></ul><ul><li>Counselling as bricolage </li></ul><ul><li>Life space </li></ul>
  12. 12. Identity Construction - as the basis for SocioDynamic Counselling <ul><li>to internalise / to externalise </li></ul><ul><li>process of identification: unconscious for children, conscious for adults </li></ul><ul><li>to ”negotiate” the identity using a language </li></ul><ul><li>to give meaning to work, education, career, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>positive identity > positive relationship to the environment </li></ul>
  13. 13. Counselling as Empowering Identity Negotiation Vision = What do I want to become? Membership of a community/ communities = Where do I belong? Meaning making = What kind of work, education, etc. experiences do I have? Everyday practices and routines = What do I do?
  14. 14. EXPERIENCE ROLE IDENTITY
  15. 15. Where is the Future The future is not out there – some place ahead of me that I am going to. It is not a place I must get ready for, that I must prepare to find. The future is not found, it’s MADE. The future is a place I create. I give birth to the future, first of all, in my imagination. I must be able to IMAGINE what kind of future I would prefer.. Then, I orient towards that future by my DESIRE to actualise it. The possibility of this future MATTERS to me. It has MEANING for me. Finally, I must act to create the future I desire. By ACTING and INTERACTING, I transform the future from possibility into actuality. The formula for future creation is: IMAGINE, DESIRE, ACT .
  16. 16. Entering the Life Space of a Client <ul><li>dialogic listening </li></ul><ul><li>to find the other where the other is </li></ul><ul><li>create a holistic equilibrium between the client and the counsellor </li></ul><ul><li>life space mapping </li></ul><ul><li>studying: experience > voices/roles > identity </li></ul><ul><li>taking into account the client’s social environment </li></ul>
  17. 17. Good Questions <ul><li>Who are the other people involved in the concern? </li></ul><ul><li>In what way are they involved? </li></ul><ul><li>What are you thinking/doing at the moment related to the problem? </li></ul><ul><li>Main effect this problem has on your daily life? </li></ul><ul><li>How would your life change if this problem did not exist? </li></ul><ul><li>What is stopping you from resolving this difficulty? </li></ul><ul><li>If you suddenly got the power to change the situation, what is the main thing you would change? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do yourself? </li></ul><ul><li>Who else could help you? </li></ul><ul><li>If someone else has this problem, what would you suggest they do? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Mapping (the meanings) <ul><li>Clarifying and simplifying complex situations </li></ul><ul><li>Creating new insights and ideas about the concern </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying strengths and barriers </li></ul><ul><li>Serving as a preliminary plan of action </li></ul><ul><li>Revealing influences and patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Revealing important relationships and connections </li></ul><ul><li>Making the self visible </li></ul><ul><li>Revealing a sense of self within the existing reality </li></ul><ul><li>Producing descriptions of actions, feelings, and interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Contextualising the concern </li></ul>
  19. 19. Methods <ul><li>Life space, visualising, other mappings </li></ul><ul><li>Drawing the line of my life </li></ul><ul><li>Life as a book, the chapters of my life </li></ul><ul><li>My story </li></ul><ul><li>House of voices </li></ul><ul><li>Metaphors </li></ul><ul><li>My possible futures </li></ul>
  20. 20. Methods <ul><li>Making meaning through relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Magic wand </li></ul><ul><li>Talking circle </li></ul><ul><li>Now that I am older </li></ul><ul><li>Important photos, objects </li></ul><ul><li>My projects </li></ul>
  21. 21. Methods <ul><li>The fruits of my life </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping direction in my life </li></ul>
  22. 22. HELP SEEKER COUNSELLOR I BRING WITH ME I BRING WITH ME 1 MY STORY OF MY CONCERN 1 MY ABILITY TO GUIDE DIALOGUE 2 MY VIEW OF MY PROBLEM 2 A RANGE OF PROBLEM-SOLVING MODELS 3. READINESS/UNREADINESS 3 INTENTION TO CREATE TRUST & SAFETY 4. DESIRE TO EXPRESS MYSELF 4 LISTENING ABILITY 5 MY ATTITUDE TOWARDS HELP 5 MY ABILITY TO LEARN FROM YOU 6. MY RELEVANT EXPERIENCE 6 A DESIRE TO ENTER INTO YOUR LIFE SPACE 7. MY NEEDS, DREAMS, FEARS 7 INTEREST IN AND OPENNESS TO YOU 8. MY DESIRE FOR CAPACITY 8 A DESIRE TO WORK CO-OPERATIVELY 9. WHAT I KNOW HOW TO DO 9 ACCESS TO RELEVANT DATA 10 UNCERTAINTY 10 RESPECT, HOPE AND SUPPORTIVENSS 11 PERCEPTIONS OF CONSTRAINT 11 POSSIBILITY & EXLORATION OF LIMITS 12 CONFUSION 12 CLARIFICATION
  23. 23. Basic Conditions for Group Dynamics <ul><li>Meaning of the Group: </li></ul><ul><li>Task </li></ul><ul><li>Goal of the Group </li></ul>Group Dynamics Participation, communication, norms, roles, leadership, cohesion, motivation, etc. Results Emotional experiences, therapeutic effect, learning experiences, factual results (employment, etc.), productivity, general well being, etc. Environmental factors: Physical, social environment, position of the group in a system Group Members: Diversity (age, gender, educational background), social structures, group leader? Group leaders: One or more? Qualifications Competences
  24. 24. <ul><li>Developmental Phases of a Group : </li></ul><ul><li>Planning : to motivate, to understand why </li></ul><ul><li>Start : joining the group, getting to know each other, my </li></ul><ul><li>place in this group, my relationship to others, trust </li></ul><ul><li>3. Working : orientation according to the main goals, </li></ul><ul><li>take responsibility for themselves, activity, </li></ul><ul><li>problem-solving, sharing </li></ul><ul><li>4. Ending : make a resumé of what you have learned, </li></ul><ul><li>evaluate the experiences, evaluate the goals </li></ul><ul><li>5. Follow Up : checking that the new ideas and skills </li></ul><ul><li>become reality, support for the individuals </li></ul>
  25. 25. Some Tasks for a Good Group Counsellor <ul><li>To create good circumstances/frames/space for the group </li></ul><ul><li>To clarify the main tasks of the group </li></ul><ul><li>To stand uncertainty – have contact with personal feelings </li></ul><ul><li>To understand/”manipulate” group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>To create a relationship with all members of the group </li></ul><ul><li>To build up a safe and trusting atmosphere </li></ul><ul><li>To act as a ”container” </li></ul><ul><li>To enable communication between group members </li></ul><ul><li>To encourage creativity </li></ul>
  26. 26. SOME EXAMPLES OF GROUPS: <ul><li>Classroom teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Group counselling in schools </li></ul><ul><li>Career counselling in employment offices </li></ul><ul><li>Starting up a business </li></ul><ul><li>How to achieve a life change – empowerment for career development </li></ul><ul><li>Job clubs </li></ul>
  27. 27. CONCLUSIONS: <ul><li>SOCIODYNAMIC PHILOSOPHY AND METHODS ARE USEFUL IN GROUP COUNSELLING IF CERTAIN CONDITIONS ARE FULLFILLED (TIME, GROUP SIZE, ETC.) </li></ul><ul><li>GROUP COUNSELLING STARTS UP DIFFERENT KINDS OF PROCESSES THAN IN INDIVIDUAL COUNSELLING </li></ul><ul><li>GROUP COUNSELLING CAN FUNCTION AS ”MINI COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE”; OFFER AN OPPORTUNITY TO STUDY EXPERIENCES OF BELONGING AND IDENTITIES </li></ul><ul><li>THE EFFECTS DEPEND ON THE INDIVIDUAL CLIENTS: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE: BASIC IDENTITY CONSTRUCTION AND IDENTIFICATION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYED: IDENTITY CHANGES </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OTHERS: TO SEE NEW POSSIBILITIES, ATTITUDE CHANGES, INFORMATION, NEW PERSPECTIVES, FEEDBACK, ETC. </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. 12 SIGNS OF GOOD SOCIODYNAMIC/CONSTRUCTIVIST COUNSELLING The counsellor presents a human face and not an official or expert face. The counsellor and help seeker converse in a way sensible to both . The counsellor and help seeker find, or create, common ground. The atmosphere is safe, friendly & supportive— both parties feel involved. The counsellor models and promotes dialogical communication . The counsellor guides the discussion but does not impose an agenda. The counselling session is focused, reflective, active and has feeling. The counsellor is attentive to the life experience of the help seeker. The counsellor is prepared to use a range of communication modes— talking, visualising, writing, reflecting, and respectful silence as needed. The counsellor customises the counselling to fit the needs of the particular help seeker. The counsellor knows how to access any data or information that is needed and is able to assist the help seeker convert the information to useful and meaningful personal knowledge. The counsellor and help seeker co-operate in producing and evaluating good ideas about possible solutions; making decisions, formulating goals, and outlining plans of action. The counsellor guides but does not impose the communication and planning.
  29. 29. More information <ul><li>www.sociodynamic-constructivist-counselling.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.taosinstitute.net </li></ul><ul><li>www.cimo.fi </li></ul><ul><li>International network in sociodynamic counselling > next seminar in Stockholm May 2007 </li></ul>

×