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Reading Reasons Motivational Mini-Lessons for Middle and High School Jocelyn Downs,  FLaRE Central Area Coordinator Based ...
Often, when we think  of reading— <ul><li>Some think of reading as: </li></ul><ul><li>novel </li></ul><ul><li>great litera...
Why Should I Read? <ul><li>Think-pair-share: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What have you read today? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wh...
But how often do you  think about reading as: <ul><li>Recipes </li></ul><ul><li>Maps </li></ul><ul><li>Income tax instruct...
Fiction and Fact <ul><li>In the Information Age, 96% of the  sites on the World Wide Web are expository in form. </li></ul...
Nine Reading Reasons <ul><li>Reading is rewarding. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading builds a mature vocabulary. </li></ul><ul><li...
Reading is rewarding “ Tuning”  from  The Winter Room  by   Gary Paulson
Why do some students not  find reading rewarding? <ul><li>Reading at frustration level </li></ul><ul><li>No choice for rea...
Reading Don’t Fix No Chevys   Michael W. Smith & Jeffery Wilhelm, 2002 <ul><li>Jimmy Santiago Baca, poet, in an interview ...
How can we fix this? <ul><li>Humorous and/or interesting read alouds </li></ul><ul><li>Books that students want to read (b...
Reading Builds a  Mature Vocabulary <ul><li>“ A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged, it is the skin of a livi...
Why is a mature vocabulary important? <ul><li>A mature vocabulary: </li></ul><ul><li>Makes you more precise </li></ul><ul>...
What are some other reasons a mature vocabulary is helpful? <ul><li>Three minute buzz </li></ul>
Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>“Reading and writing have been thought of as opposites—with reading regarded as ...
Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>Both readers and writers actively  engage in constructing meaning  from and with...
Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>They use a common tool of cognitive strategies—planning and setting goals, tappi...
Reading is hard,  and “hard” is necessary <ul><li>Can you think of a time when you struggled with a text? </li></ul><ul><l...
Reading makes you smarter <ul><li>“Terrance Paul notes that: </li></ul><ul><li>‘The quantity of books available is the bes...
Reading makes you smarter (and may keep you smart as you age) <ul><li>“ A landmark study released in 2000 by the Alzheimer...
Reading prepares you  for the world of work <ul><li>“ As recently as the 1950’s, twenty percent of the jobs in America wer...
Reading prepares you  for the world of work <ul><li>“ No longer will today’s high school diploma lead to a job that will g...
<ul><li>Career Cluster </li></ul><ul><li>Agriculture/Natural Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture/Construction </li></...
<ul><li>Grade Level </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade ...
Reading well is  financially rewarding <ul><li>The average lifetime earnings for a student who does not finish high school...
Reading well is  financially rewarding <ul><li>Four years of high school (assuming some  time off for illness) amounts to ...
Reading well is  financially rewarding <ul><li>Therefore, students earn $66.67 to attend one class each day (based on a si...
Reading opens the door  to college and beyond <ul><li>There are a number of factors admission officers consider when revie...
Reading opens the door  to college and beyond <ul><li>Reading well in junior and senior high not only allows students to g...
Reading arms you  against oppression <ul><li>The fourth grader who is significantly below grade level in reading will most...
Reading arms you  against oppression <ul><li>“Kati Haycock, Director of the Education Trust, notes that recent research ha...
Reading arms you  against oppression <ul><li>“A 1998 Boston study of the effect public school teachers have on learning: ‘...
Reading arms you  against oppression <ul><li>“ Groundbreaking research in Tennessee and Texas shows that these effects are...
Reading arms you  against oppression
Works Cited <ul><li>Bertrand, Diane Gonzales. (1999).  Trino’s Choice.  Houston: Pinata Books.  </li></ul><ul><li>Daggett,...
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Reading Reasons Motivational Mini Lessons For Middle And High School

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  • Transcript of "Reading Reasons Motivational Mini Lessons For Middle And High School"

    1. 1. Reading Reasons Motivational Mini-Lessons for Middle and High School Jocelyn Downs, FLaRE Central Area Coordinator Based on the book by Kelly Gallagher
    2. 2. Often, when we think of reading— <ul><li>Some think of reading as: </li></ul><ul><li>novel </li></ul><ul><li>great literature </li></ul><ul><li>students listening to a teacher </li></ul><ul><li>children listening to a parent </li></ul><ul><li>reading groups and reading classes </li></ul><ul><li>basals and phonics </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why Should I Read? <ul><li>Think-pair-share: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What have you read today? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What have you read this month? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What have you read recently for pleasure? </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. But how often do you think about reading as: <ul><li>Recipes </li></ul><ul><li>Maps </li></ul><ul><li>Income tax instructions </li></ul><ul><li>Blueprints </li></ul>
    5. 5. Fiction and Fact <ul><li>In the Information Age, 96% of the sites on the World Wide Web are expository in form. </li></ul><ul><li>M. L. Kamil & D. M. Lane, 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of reading and writing adults do is nonfiction. </li></ul><ul><li>R. L. Venezky, 1982 </li></ul>
    6. 6. Nine Reading Reasons <ul><li>Reading is rewarding. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading builds a mature vocabulary. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading makes you a better writer. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading is hard, and “hard” is necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Reading makes you smarter. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Reading prepares you for the world of work. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Reading well is financially rewarding. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Reading opens the door to college and beyond. </li></ul><ul><li>9. Reading arms you against oppression. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 17
    7. 7. Reading is rewarding “ Tuning” from The Winter Room by Gary Paulson
    8. 8. Why do some students not find reading rewarding? <ul><li>Reading at frustration level </li></ul><ul><li>No choice for reading </li></ul><ul><li>Never experienced “on the knee” reading </li></ul><ul><li>Are not/do not visualize when they read </li></ul><ul><li>Other reasons? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Reading Don’t Fix No Chevys Michael W. Smith & Jeffery Wilhelm, 2002 <ul><li>Jimmy Santiago Baca, poet, in an interview with Bill Moyers, tells why he was filled with a tremendous urge to read more. </li></ul>
    10. 10. How can we fix this? <ul><li>Humorous and/or interesting read alouds </li></ul><ul><li>Books that students want to read (both fiction and informational text) </li></ul><ul><li>Book clubs and literature circles </li></ul><ul><li>Research topics based on student choice and interest </li></ul>
    11. 11. Reading Builds a Mature Vocabulary <ul><li>“ A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged, it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstance and time in which it is used.” </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>in Town v. Eisner , 245 U.S. 418, 425 </li></ul>
    12. 12. Why is a mature vocabulary important? <ul><li>A mature vocabulary: </li></ul><ul><li>Makes you more precise </li></ul><ul><li>Allows you to say what you really mean </li></ul><ul><li>Allows you to interpret what others really mean (such as legal terms) </li></ul><ul><li>Makes you seem more intelligent </li></ul>
    13. 13. What are some other reasons a mature vocabulary is helpful? <ul><li>Three minute buzz </li></ul>
    14. 14. Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>“Reading and writing have been thought of as opposites—with reading regarded as receptive and writing regarded as productive.” Researchers have found that reading and writing are ‘essentially the same process of meaning construction’ and that readers and writers share a surprising number of characteristics.” </li></ul><ul><li>Carol Booth Olson, 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>The Reading/Writing Connection, p. 17 </li></ul>
    15. 15. Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>Both readers and writers actively engage in constructing meaning from and with texts. </li></ul><ul><li>Both move back and forth in a recursive process </li></ul><ul><li>They interact and negotiate with both reading and writing—that is, they keep writing in mind when reading and reading in mind when writing. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Reading makes you a better writer <ul><li>They use a common tool of cognitive strategies—planning and setting goals, tapping prior knowledge, asking questions, making connections, summarizing, monitoring, revising meaning, reflecting and evaluating. </li></ul><ul><li>They use skills automatically. </li></ul><ul><li>They are self-motivated and confident. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Reading is hard, and “hard” is necessary <ul><li>Can you think of a time when you struggled with a text? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you think of a time when someone you know had an unexpectedly easy time with a text you considered difficult? </li></ul><ul><li>All of us are good readers and all of us are bad readers, it depends on what we are reading. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Reading makes you smarter <ul><li>“Terrance Paul notes that: </li></ul><ul><li>‘The quantity of books available is the best single indicator of test score performance and success in schools, and is a better predictor than socioeconomic status or parent education.’” </li></ul><ul><li>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 26 </li></ul>
    19. 19. Reading makes you smarter (and may keep you smart as you age) <ul><li>“ A landmark study released in 2000 by the Alzheimer’s Association examined pairs of elderly twins in which one of the twins had dementia while the other one had remained healthy. The researchers found that low education was a significant risk factor for Alzheimer’s </li></ul><ul><li>disease and all other forms of dementia. </li></ul><ul><li>Further analysis showed that twins who </li></ul><ul><li>later became demented read fewer </li></ul><ul><li>books, particularly as adults, compared </li></ul><ul><li>to their nondemented siblings.” </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 27
    20. 20. Reading prepares you for the world of work <ul><li>“ As recently as the 1950’s, twenty percent of the jobs in America were professional, twenty percent skilled, and sixty percent unskilled. In the 1990’s, twenty percent of the jobs remained professional, but skilled jobs rose to sixty-plus percent while unskilled jobs fell below twenty percent.” Richard Murnane & Frank Levy, 1996 </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy , p. vii </li></ul>
    21. 21. Reading prepares you for the world of work <ul><li>“ No longer will today’s high school diploma lead to a job that will guarantee entry into middle class.” </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Murnane & Frank Levy, 1996 </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy , p. vii </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>Career Cluster </li></ul><ul><li>Agriculture/Natural Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture/Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Arts/AV Technology </li></ul><ul><li>/Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Business and Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Education and Training </li></ul><ul><li>Health Science </li></ul><ul><li>Hospitality and Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Human Services </li></ul><ul><li>Law and Public Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Lexile Text Measure </li></ul><ul><li>1270-1510 </li></ul><ul><li>1210-1340 </li></ul><ul><li>1100-1190 </li></ul><ul><li>1210-1310 </li></ul><ul><li>1320-1370 </li></ul><ul><li>1260-1300 </li></ul><ul><li>1230-1260 </li></ul><ul><li>1050-1200 </li></ul><ul><li>1420-1740 </li></ul><ul><li>1200-1310 </li></ul>Reading prepares you for the world of work Text Measures of Entry-level Occupational Reading Materials Willard R. Daggett, 2003
    23. 23. <ul><li>Grade Level </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 8 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 9 </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 10 </li></ul><ul><li>11 and 12 </li></ul><ul><li>Reading Level </li></ul><ul><li>665-1000 </li></ul><ul><li>735-1065 </li></ul><ul><li>805-1100 </li></ul><ul><li>855-1165 </li></ul><ul><li>905-1195 </li></ul><ul><li>940-1210 </li></ul>Reading prepares you for the world of work Lexile Measures of Readers (Middle 50% of students the interquartile range at mid-year ) Willard R. Daggett, 2003
    24. 24. Reading well is financially rewarding <ul><li>The average lifetime earnings for a student who does not finish high school is $936,000. </li></ul><ul><li>The average lifetime earnings for a student who does finish high school is $1,216,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, a high school diploma is worth $280,000. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 29
    25. 25. Reading well is financially rewarding <ul><li>Four years of high school (assuming some time off for illness) amounts to 700 days of school. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, students are “paid” $280,000 for 700 days of school. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, students earn $400 per day. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 29
    26. 26. Reading well is financially rewarding <ul><li>Therefore, students earn $66.67 to attend one class each day (based on a six period day). Students who finish college will earn a lot more per day than that. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 29
    27. 27. Reading opens the door to college and beyond <ul><li>There are a number of factors admission officers consider when reviewing a student’s application: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The number of advanced placement classes taken by applicant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The applicant’s SAT and SAT II scores </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The student’s personal essay </li></ul></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 31
    28. 28. Reading opens the door to college and beyond <ul><li>Reading well in junior and senior high not only allows students to gain admittance to college, it also goes a long way in making sure they leave with a diploma in hand. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 34
    29. 29. Reading arms you against oppression <ul><li>The fourth grader who is significantly below grade level in reading will most likely be behind in sixth, ninth and twelfth grade. </li></ul><ul><li>We cannot accept these facts as unsurmountable hurdles. </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 35
    30. 30. Reading arms you against oppression <ul><li>“Kati Haycock, Director of the Education Trust, notes that recent research has shown that ‘what matters most is good teaching.’” </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 36
    31. 31. Reading arms you against oppression <ul><li>“A 1998 Boston study of the effect public school teachers have on learning: ‘In just one academic year, the top third of teachers produced as much as six times the learning growth as the bottom third of teachers.’” </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 36
    32. 32. Reading arms you against oppression <ul><li>“ Groundbreaking research in Tennessee and Texas shows that these effects are cumulative and hold up regardless of race, class, or prior achievement levels. Some of the classrooms showing the greatest gains are filled with low-income students, some with well-to-do students . . . It’s not the kids after all: Something very different is going on with the teaching.” </li></ul>Kelly Gallagher, 2003 Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini- Lessons for Middle and High School. p. 36
    33. 33. Reading arms you against oppression
    34. 34. Works Cited <ul><li>Bertrand, Diane Gonzales. (1999). Trino’s Choice. Houston: Pinata Books. </li></ul><ul><li>Daggett, Willard R. (2003). Achieving Reading Proficiency for All . Available online http://www.icle.net/white_papers.html </li></ul><ul><li>Gallagher, Kelly. 2003. Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini-Lessons for Middle and High School. Portland: Stenhouse . </li></ul><ul><li>Haycox, Kati. (2001). “Closing the Achievement Gap.” E ducational Leadership 58, no. 6: 28-31. </li></ul><ul><li>Kamil, M. L. , & Lane, D. M. (1998). Researching the relation between technology and literacy: An agenda for the 21st century. In D. R. Reinking, L. D. Labbo, M. McKenna, & R. Kieffer (Eds.), Literacy for the 21st Century: Technological transformations in a post-typographic world (pp. 235–251). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. </li></ul><ul><li>Murnane, Richard & Levy, Frank. (1996). Teaching the New Basic Skills: Principles for Educating Children to Thrive in a Changing Economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Olson, Carol Booth. 2003. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. </li></ul><ul><li>Paulsen, Gary. (1989). The Winter Room. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell. </li></ul><ul><li>Smith, Michael W. & Wilhelm, Jeffery D. (2002). Reading Don’t Fix No Chevys: Literacy in the Lives of Young Men. Portsmouth: Heinemann. </li></ul><ul><li>Towne v. Eisner , 245 U.S. 418 (1918). </li></ul><ul><li>Venezky, R. L. (1982). The origins of the present-day chasm between adult literacy needs and school literacy instruction. Visible Language , 16, 112–127. </li></ul>
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