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National Textile Center
 

National Textile Center

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    National Textile Center National Textile Center Presentation Transcript

    • National Textile Center 10 Years of Leadership 1992-2002 Presented by Dr. Thomas J. Malone February 10, 2002
    • The Power of Collaboration Fiber/Fabric Apparel and Other Fabricated Textile Products Retail USA INTEGRATED TEXTILE INDUSTRIES
    • Dr. Joe Cunning CONGRATULATIONS!!! and THANKS!!! for 10 Years World Class Leadership of the National Textile Center
    • National Textile Center 1992 – 2002 10 Years of Change
    • Why is NTC Important for America?
    • Because: NTC can Make a DIFFERENCE
    • National Textile Center Vision and Mission VISION MISSION To be the agent leading change in the industry’s vision and in education for global competitiveness. To enhance the knowledge base that drives the momentum of the U.S. Industry competitiveness.
    • National Textile Center GOALS Research Education To discover, design and develop new materials, innovative and improved manufacturing processes, and integrated systems essential to the success of a modern U.S. textile enterprise.
      • To educate and train personnel
      • Establish industrial partnerships
      • Create transfer mechanisms to ensure utilization of developed technologies
      Partnership To strengthen the nation’s textile research and educational efforts by uniting diverse experts and resources in unique collaborative projects.
    • National Textile Center Original Organizational Chart Oversight Committee Technical Advisory Committee Georgia Tech Clemson Auburn N. C. State
    • National Textile Center 1992-2001 31 Different TAC & Oversight Members from Industry Alabama North Carolina South Carolina Georgia Pennsylvania New York Massachusetts NTC STATES Arizona California Delaware Iowa Illinois Louisiana Nevada New Jersey New Mexico Ohio Oklahoma Rhode Island Tennessee Virginia OTHER STATES COUNTRIES* Australia China England France Israel Japan Investigators have come from 21 Different States and 6 countries *(Mostly Visiting Professors )
    • National Textile Center is growing in both budget and number of schools largely because industry believes in our mission
    • National Textile Center Number of Participating Universities Auburn Georgia Tech Clemson North Carolina State Philadelphia University University of Mass-Dartmouth Cornell UCal Davis
    • National Textile Center ANNUAL FUNDING 1992-2002 Be Between 1992 and 1996 there were 4 Universities: Auburn, Ga. Tech, Clemson, and North Carolina State University of Mass-Dartmouth added in 1997 Philadelphia University added in 1998 Cornell added in 2001 and UCal Davis added in 2002 Total $83.5MM MM$
    • National Textile Center Number of Projects Initiated New projects initiated in that year. Total: 183 Projects
    • National Textile Center Number of Projects Completed by University New projects initiated in that year. Total: 109 Completed 14 Cancelled
    • National Textile Center Number of Investigators Includes only new principal investigators to NTC; i.e. investigators on multiple projects only counted once. Total: 362 Investigators
    • National Textile Center Number of Students Largely graduate students, but also includes some undergraduate and post-doctoral (all categories undercounted due to underreporting. Total: 935 Students
    • National Textile Center Cumulative Breakdown by University 336 183 200 520 82 17 73 69 Updated: 1/28/02
    • National Textile Center Intellectual Property Publications/ Presentations 1,674 Theses Copyrights/Notices of Invention Patents/ Applications 205 37 19
    • 10 National Textile Center Collaborations/Technology Transfer Industrial Collaborations 3766 Non NTC Academic Collaborations Students Involved in NTC Research Government and Other Collaborations 1656 928 735 Technology Transfer Programs Startup Companies 5 Industry Funded
    • National Textile Center 1992-2001 Patents and Applications Copyrights and Notices of Invention Startup Companies Technology Transfer Programs (Industry-Funded) Theses Publications and Presentations Students Involved in NTC Research Industrial Collaborations Non-NTC Academic Collaborations Government and Other Collaborations 19 37 5 10 205 1,674 928 3,766 1,656 735
    • OVERALL 6,157 IP/Collaborations/Tech Transfer 61% Industrial National Textile Center
    • 1992-2002 Decade of Change What has happened to USA Total Manufacturing?
    • U. S. Balance of International Trade In Goods Balance in Billions $ Per Year Source: Department of Commerce FT-900 Projected Decrease from 2000 to 2001 of $24B or 5.3%
    • “ If there is one rule of international economics, it is that no country can run a large trade deficit forever. Trade deficits need to be financed, and it is simply impossible to borrow enough to keep up with the compound interest.  Yet all the world trade, especially that on the Pacific Rim, depends upon most of this world being able to run trade surpluses with the United States that will allow them to pay for their trade deficits with Japan.  When the lending to America stops, and it will stop, what happens to current world trade flows?” Lester Thurow The Future of Capitalism
    • Total USA Manufacturing Jobs Data as of Year End +35 +.2% +296 +1.5% -152 -.8% -1322 -7.2% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Milliken Marketing Research 1/4/02 1,475 Thousand Jobs Lost Last 6 Years or 8% Jobs Lost Last 6 Years -189 -143 -1.0% -.8%
    • "I regret that trade policy has been inextricably linked with job creation. We try to promote free trade on the mistaken ground that it will create jobs. [But] it is difficult to find credible evidence that trade has impacted the level of total employment in this country over the long run." Alan Greenspan Federal Reserve Board Chairman Washington Post April 17, 1999
    • 1992-2002 Decade of Change What has happened to the USA Textile Manufacturing?
    • Textile & Apparel Trade Deficit Millions of Dollars: U.S. Exports (F.A.S.) Minus Imports (Customs) for Each Year Source: ATMI Textile HiLights Projected increase from 2000 to 2001 of $.8B or 1.3% NAFTA 59 63 67 71 75 79 83 87 91 95 99 00 01 61.6 52.8
    • Source: Federal Reserve , Last data point December, 2001 Release Date: January 16, 2002 INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION INDEX All Manufacturing and Textiles 1992 = 100
    • USA Integrated Textile Industries Market Plus Exports Textiles, Apparel, and Other Fabricated Textile Products Billion Square Meters Equivalent Changes: 1981-2001E 2001 Est. Change in SME Total USA Market +16.4 SME Potential USA Production w/Market Growth +16.5 SME Imports +19.4 SME Exports +2.8 SME Total USA Production –3.0 SME USA Production for Domestic Markets -5.8 SME Source: Werner International (Note: 2001 estimated market decline was based on 7% reduction in textile mill shipment through October 2001—applied to 2000 Est. of U. S. Prod. And to total market. -1.2 -1.1 +0 -1.2 -0.8 -0.4 NAFTA ASIA DEVALUATION CBI Since NAFTA Domestic Production -6.4B SME
    • USA Integrated Textile Industries Jobs Textiles, Apparel, and Fabricated Textile Products (Excludes Man-Made Fibers, Natural Fibers, and Textile Machinery Production) Data as of Year End 567 Thousand Jobs Lost Last 6 Years or 37% Jobs Lost Last 6 Years -104 7.3% -108 8.2% -89 7.4% -146 13.1% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Milliken Marketing Research 1/4/02 -52 3.5% -68 4.4%
    • US Apparel and Other Fabricated Textile Product Jobs (Excludes Man-Made Fibers, Natural Fibers, and Textile Machinery Production) Data as of Year End 370 Thousand Jobs Lost Last 6 Years or 41.3% Jobs Lost Last 6 Years -72 9.0% -71 9.7% -56 8.5% -79 13.1% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Milliken Marketing Research 1/5/01 -44 5.2% -48 5.4%
    • Total USA Textile Jobs Data as of Year End 197 Thousand Jobs Lost Last 6 Years or 30.8% Jobs Lost Last 6Years -32 5.2% -37 6.4% -33 6.1% -67 13.1% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Milliken Marketing Research 1/5/01 -8 1.3% -20 3.1%
    • TEXTILE PLANT CLOSINGS 414 Plants Last 5 Years
    • US Sewn Apparel down to 10% of US Market Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 Assuming China in WTO and effects of CBI Parity and Sub-Sahara Africa 38% 10% 6% 15% 17% 17% 13% 20% 21% 21% 43% 54% 56% 59% 4% 5% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 1995 2000 2005 2010 SME Share of US Apparel Market Rest of World CBI (Includes 807) Mexico (Includes 807) US Production (US Cut and Sew)
    • Imports from Mexico using less US Fabric Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 Apparel Imports from Mexico (Millions of SME's) - 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001E Non 807 807 807a Portion w/ US Fabric -8%
    • CBI growth weakens despite CBI Parity Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 Apparel Imports from CBI (Millions of SME's) - 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 4,000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001E Non 807 807 807a Portion w/ US Fabric - 2%
    • Mexico and CBI exports fall despite CBI parity U.S. TEXTILE EXPORTS*     Percent Change Percent Change YTD 9/00 - YTD 9/01 1996 - 2000 World -9% 36%   - Mexico and CBI -8% 73%   - Asia -6% -4%   - EU -9% -23% *Includes exports of cut pieces of US fabric to Mexico and the CBI for reassembly into garments. Source : US DOC and US ITC via ATMI Based on US$ value of exports, not SME’s as in Import data Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
    • Imports from Asia explode Post-Devaluation Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 IMPORTS FROM ASIA Textiles and Apparel in Year-Ending Change Millions of square meters   September 2001 from 1996 Asia 16,108 69%   - Pakistan 2,107 159%   - Thailand 1,308 108%   - Indonesia 1,159 92%   - South Korea 1,392 91%   - Bangladesh 1,186 90%   - Sri Lanka 661 55%   - Philippines 909 46%   - India 1,220 40%   - China 2,163 32%   - Hong Kong 1,092 22%   - Japan 261 6%   - Taiwan 1,224 2% Source : US DOC and US ITC via ATMI
    • USA Integrated Textile Industries Market Plus Exports Textiles, Apparel, and Other Fabricated Textile Products Billion Square Meters Equivalent Changes: 1994- 2001E 2001 Est. Change in SME Total USA Market +3.4 SME Potential USA Production w/Market Growth +3.5 SME Imports +9.8 SME Exports +1.6 SME Total USA Production –6.4 SME USA Production for Domestic Markets –8.0 SME Source: Werner International (Note: 2001 estimated market decline was based on 7% reduction in textile mill shipment through October 2001—applied to 2000 Est. of U. S. Prod. And to total market. -1.2 -1.1 +0 -1.2 -0.8 -0.4 NAFTA ASIA DEVALUATION CBI Since NAFTA Domestic Production -6.4B SME
    • Textile profits plunge after Asian devaluation Source : ATMI Textile Highlights - December 2001 Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Billion Dollars 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Index 1995=100 Textile Profits Asian Currency Index
    • “ Our manufacturing base is being eroded as dollars are diverted from wealth creation to wealth consumption. If economic history has any lesson for us, it is that a nation’s well-being is determined by what it produces, not by how much it consumes.” Roger Milliken Textile Hall of Fame September 10, 2001
    • What We Need to Do To Survive as a Healthy Industry
    • Kurt Salmon Associates January 24, 2002 The Textile Industry “ Current Status and Actions Needed to Win”
    • Future Wins
      • Block new agreements that allow duty-free foreign fabric
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
    • Effect of Recent Trade Agreements
      • NAFTA
        • Dramatic textile over-capacity in Mexico as a result of NAFTA
        • Leading to closures of US Denim and Knitwear plants
      • CBTPA (Caribbean Basin Trade & Partnership Act)/CBI Parity
        • Apparel costs reduced by 6% to 12% into US
        • But not enough to offset Asian prices
        • If dyeing and finishing is allowed, further over-capacity would ensue
      • AGOA (African Growth & Opportunity Act)
        • Opened trade for the Sub-Saharan nations mainly with Asian fabric
        • Apparel Imports up 38% (YTD October)
      • US/Jordan Free Trade Agreement
        • Removes quotas and duty for participating zones
        • Explosive growth YTD (>600%) with non-US fabrics
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
    • Current Trade Issues
      • Continued Developments in the Caribbean
      • Supply Base
        • Expansion of fabric capabilities ( Dye and Finish) is a major threat
        • “ 807” with foreign fabrics
        • Enforcement of US origin provisions under the current act
      • New “Free Trade” agreements with other regions:
        • Andean Pact
        • Central America
        • Free Trade of the Americas
        • Etc. (Bangladesh, Pakistan, Turkey, et al)
      • ASEAN, South Asia and China
        • Participation under WTO eliminates quotas
        • Industry policy and investment strategies
        • Relative cost position
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
      • Educate yourself and representatives about the importance of U. S. manufacturing jobs and the “unfair” advantages foreign countries are exercising.
      • Demand that trade laws be enforced and blow the whistle on violators.
      • Ask for definitions of free trade from those who criticize or may be uninformed.
      • Look for American products as much as possible.
      FIGHT FOR BUSINESS Andy Warlick Southern Textile Association January 2002
    • Future Wins
      • Block new agreements that allow duty-free foreign fabric
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
      • Prevail in CBI “dye and finish” issue
    • Northern Textile Association Promises made to Textile Caucus Members for TPA Vote December 2001
      • Foreign Market Opening
      • Enforcement of Trade Agreements
      • Quota Phase-Out
      • (a) Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act dyeing, printing, and finishing
      • (b) Andean Trade Preferences Act dyeing, printing and finishing
      • Export Promotion
      • Transshipment
      • War on Terrorism
      • Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)
      • Trade remedy laws
    • Northern Textile Association Promises made to Textile Caucus Members for TPA Vote December 2001 4. (a) Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act dyeing, printing, and finishing House Leadership Promise: “ Pledge to bring no future bills with trade provisions to the House floor until the TDA 2001 (sic) is corrected to require that U.S. knit and woven fabrics be required to undergo all dyeing, finishing, and printing procedures in the U.S. in order to qualify for the benefits under the CBTPA.” Secretary Evans’ Promises: “ The Administration recognizes the importance to Members of the dyeing and finishing issue under the provisions of the CBTPA. We support an agreement by Congress that would address this issue while maintaining the balance of benefits provided under the program .” (Emphasis added.)
    • Future Wins
      • Block new agreements that allow duty-free foreign fabric
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
      • Prevail in CBI “dye and finish” issue
      • Improve competitiveness of US fiber : cotton and MMF
    • US Polyester prices averaged 32% higher than Asian prices from 1988 to 2001 Polyester Short Staple Prices : US vs Asia 0 50 100 150 200 250 1988 Q1 1990 Q1 1992 Q1 1994 Q1 1996 Q1 1998 Q1 2000 Q1 2002 Q1 US Cents per Kilo US Prices Asian Prices Source : PCI - Fibres and Raw Materials Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
    • In 2001 US producers had a significant cotton price disadvantage to foreign mills Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002 World Cotton Prices - Cotlook A Index 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 2000 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2001 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2002 Q1 US cents/pound Effective Foreign Price $0.43 / lb in 2001 Effective US Price $ 0.58 / lb in 2001 $700 million
    • Future Wins
      • Block new agreements that allow duty-free foreign fabric
      Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
      • Focus on differentiated products and short lead times:
        • Strategic supplier and customer relationships for innovation
        • Reduce lead times through supply chain technology/strategies
      • Prevail in CBI “dye and finish” issue
      • Improve competitiveness of US fiber : cotton and MMF
      • Focus on differentiated products and short lead times:
        • Reduce lead times through supply chain technology/strategies
        • Strategic supplier and customer relationships for innovation
      FUTURE WINS Fernando Silva Kurt Salmon Associates January 2002
    • “ Now as our country stands alone as the world’s last remaining super power, we in textiles and almost all of U.S. manufacturing find ourselves at risk of losing what our forefathers fought so hard to create.  This is neither necessary nor wise! ” Roger Milliken Textile Hall of Fame September 10, 2001
    • Why is NTC Important for America? National Textile Center
    • Because: NTC can Make a DIFFERENCE
    • We Survive!! Each year is a new funding cycle for Congress and we get through it! National Textile Center
    • NTC CHALLENGE Focus on Making Your Research Useful “ Make A Difference”
    • Make a Real Difference!!
      • Organize a collective effort to communicate the importance of:
      • A. Manufacturing
      • B. Textile Industry
          • Value Added
          • Innovation
      National Textile Center CHALLENGE
    • NTC CHALLENGE Focus On Innovation (Technology/Products) and Short Lead Times (Speed)
    • With Vision, Commitment and Passion The Industry can WIN!!
    • If the Industry Wins NTC Wins!!!
    • The Power of Collaboration Fiber/Fabric Apparel and Other Fabricated Textile Products Retail USA INTEGRATED TEXTILE INDUSTRIES
    • Dr. Joe Cunning CONGRATULATIONS!!! and THANKS!!! for 10 Years World Class Leadership of the National Textile Center
    •