Social Exclusion NARCC Expert Roundtable October 23 2004 Grace-Edward Galabuzi Ryerson University
Introduction <ul><li>Canada’s changing population </li></ul><ul><li>Social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Dimensions of socia...
Canada’s Changing Population, Immigration and Labour force <ul><li>Canada welcomed an annual average of close to 200,000 n...
Racialized Groups, Recent Immigrants and Canada’s changing population make-up <ul><li>There has been a significant change ...
Canadian population growth rates  <ul><li>During the census period (1996-2001), the growth of the racialized group populat...
Social Exclusion   <ul><li>Describes  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>structures of inequality  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>processes...
Aspects of Social Exclusion <ul><li>Denial of civil engagement through legal sanction and other institutional mechanisms. ...
Dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>Racialized groups and new immigrants experience differential life chances. Characte...
Economic exclusion <ul><li>A segmented labour market </li></ul><ul><li>Income inequality </li></ul><ul><li>Inequality in a...
Labour Market segregation <ul><li>Racialized group members are over represented in many low paying occupations, with high ...
Inequality in employment incomes <ul><li>The impact of racialized segregation on income distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Dur...
Unemployment rates for Immigrants, Non-Immigrants, and Visible Minorities (%) <ul><li>1981  1991  2001 </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Labour force participation <ul><li>Patterns of lower labour force participation among immigrants coincided with the shift ...
Unequal return to education <ul><li>Average earnings of immigrants and Canadian born with university degree in ‘000 </li><...
Globalization and racial discrimination <ul><li>Neo-liberal restructuring and demands for flexibility have made precarious...
Racial Discrimination in Employment <ul><li>Racial discrimination in Employment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical Racism an...
The Racialization of Poverty <ul><li>The Racialization of poverty is linked to the process of the deepening social exclusi...
Racialization of Poverty  <ul><li>In 1995, the rate for racialized children under six living in low income families was 45...
Low-income rates rise among successive groups of immigrants <ul><li>During the past two decades, low-income rates have inc...
Neighbourhood dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>In Canada’s urban areas, the spatial concentration of poverty or resi...
Racialized neighbourhoods <ul><li>Toronto Area racialized enclaves experience high poverty rates </li></ul><ul><li>  Unive...
Neighbourhood dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>One way to understand the increase in various forms of violence, incl...
Social exclusion and the Criminal Justice System <ul><li>Racialized group members and immigrant communities have historica...
Social Exclusion and Health <ul><li>Discrimination in the health care system is characterized by: </li></ul><ul><li>-langu...
Racism and Mental Health <ul><li>Many racialized group members and immigrants with mental health issues and mental illness...
Social Exclusion: Implications for Social policy <ul><li>The social exclusion framework can be a basis for identifying bar...
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Narcc Expert Roundtable

  1. 1. Social Exclusion NARCC Expert Roundtable October 23 2004 Grace-Edward Galabuzi Ryerson University
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Canada’s changing population </li></ul><ul><li>Social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Dimensions of social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Racialization of poverty </li></ul><ul><li>Social exclusion and neighbourhoods </li></ul><ul><li>Social exclusion and the criminal Justice system </li></ul><ul><li>Social exclusion and health </li></ul>
  3. 3. Canada’s Changing Population, Immigration and Labour force <ul><li>Canada welcomed an annual average of close to 200,000 new immigrants and refugees over the 1990s. </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration accounted for more than 50% of the net population growth between 1991 – 1996. </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration accounted for 70% of the growth in the labour force from 1991- 1996 </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration will account for virtually all of the net growth in the Canadian labour force by the year 2011 (HRDC, 2002). </li></ul>
  4. 4. Racialized Groups, Recent Immigrants and Canada’s changing population make-up <ul><li>There has been a significant change in the source countries, with over 75% of new immigrants in the 1980s and 1990s coming from what is called the global South. </li></ul><ul><li>According to the 2001 Census data, those who self-identified as Visible Minorities (racialized group members) were 13.4% of the Canadian population while immigrants accounted for 18.4%. </li></ul><ul><li>Those figures are projected to rise to 20% and 25% respectively by 2015. This does not include non-status residents. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Canadian population growth rates <ul><li>During the census period (1996-2001), the growth of the racialized group population far outpaced the Canadian average. </li></ul><ul><li>While the Canadian population grew by 3.9% between 1996-2001, the corresponding rate for Racialized groups was 24.6%. </li></ul><ul><li>Over the same period, the racialized component of the labour force by (males 28.7%/females 32.3%) compared to (5.5% and 9% ) respectively for the Canadian population. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Social Exclusion <ul><li>Describes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>structures of inequality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>processes of inequality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>unequal outcomes among groups in society. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A form of alienation and denial of full citizenship experienced by particular groups of individuals and communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Its characteristics occur in multiple dimensions. </li></ul><ul><li>In industrialized societies, a key determinant of social exclusion is uneven access to the processes of production, wealth creation and power. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Aspects of Social Exclusion <ul><li>Denial of civil engagement through legal sanction and other institutional mechanisms. </li></ul><ul><li>Denial of access to social goods - health care, education, housing. </li></ul><ul><li>Denial of opportunity to participate actively in society. </li></ul><ul><li>Economic exclusion. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>Racialized groups and new immigrants experience differential life chances. Characteristics include: </li></ul><ul><li>Segmented labour market participation </li></ul><ul><li>A double digit racialized income gap </li></ul><ul><li>Chronically higher than average levels of unemployment, </li></ul><ul><li>Deepening levels of poverty </li></ul><ul><li>Differential access to housing and neighbourhood segregation </li></ul><ul><li>Disproportionate contact with the criminal Justice system </li></ul><ul><li>Higher health risks </li></ul>
  9. 9. Economic exclusion <ul><li>A segmented labour market </li></ul><ul><li>Income inequality </li></ul><ul><li>Inequality in access to employment </li></ul><ul><li>Higher unemployment and under employment </li></ul><ul><li>Lower labour market participation </li></ul><ul><li>Higher exposure to low income </li></ul>
  10. 10. Labour Market segregation <ul><li>Racialized group members are over represented in many low paying occupations, with high levels of precariousness while they are under represented in the better paying occupations with more secure jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>Racialized groups were over-represented in the textile, light manufacturing and service sectors occupations such as sewing machine operators (46%), electronic assemblers (42%), plastics processing (36.8%), labourers in textile processing (40%), taxi and limo drivers (36.6%), weavers and knitters (37.5%), fabrics, fur and leather cutters (40.1%), iron and pressing (40.6%). </li></ul><ul><li>They were under-represented in senior management (2.0%), professionals (6.2%), supervisors (6.3%), fire-fighters (2.0%), legislators (2.2%) </li></ul><ul><li>One area where they faired better is in the information technology industry, with software engineers (36.3%), computer engineers (30.1%) and computer programmers (27.8%). </li></ul>
  11. 11. Inequality in employment incomes <ul><li>The impact of racialized segregation on income distribution </li></ul><ul><li>During 1996-98, a period of relative prosperity in Canada: </li></ul><ul><li>Racialized Canadians in 1996 received pre-tax average earnings of $19,227, while non-racialized Canadians made $25,069, or 23% more or $5,464 - equal to about 6 months rent for average earners. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1997, the gap grew to 25% or $6,189 </li></ul><ul><li>In 1998, it fell back somewhat to 24% or $5,650 </li></ul><ul><li>The median before tax income gap remained statistically stagnant (29% in 1996 and 28% in 1998) and with the government intervention effect, the median after tax income gap grew from 23% to 25% </li></ul>
  12. 12. Unemployment rates for Immigrants, Non-Immigrants, and Visible Minorities (%) <ul><li>1981 1991 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Total labour force 5.9 9.6 6.7 </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian born 6.3 9.4 6.4 </li></ul><ul><li>All immigrants 4.5 10.4 7.9 </li></ul><ul><li>Recent Immigrants 6.0 15.6 12.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Visible Minorities n/a 9.1 12.6 </li></ul><ul><li>_______________________________________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census Analysis Series. The Changing Profile of Canada’s Labour Force, February, 11, 2000 and 2001 Employment Equity Act Report, Human Resource and Development Canada. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Labour force participation <ul><li>Patterns of lower labour force participation among immigrants coincided with the shift to immigration from the global South </li></ul><ul><li>1981 1991 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Total labour force 75.5 78.2 80.3 </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian born 74.6 78.7 81.8 </li></ul><ul><li>All immigrants 79.3 77.2 75.6 </li></ul><ul><li>Recent Immigrants 75.7 68.6 65.8 </li></ul><ul><li>Racial Minorities n/a 70.5 66.0 </li></ul>
  14. 14. Unequal return to education <ul><li>Average earnings of immigrants and Canadian born with university degree in ‘000 </li></ul><ul><li> Male Female </li></ul><ul><li>1990 2000 1990 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>1yr in Can. $33 $31.5 $21 $19.8 </li></ul><ul><li>10yr in Can. $52 $47.5 $32.5 $32.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Can. Born $60 $66.5 $37 $41 </li></ul><ul><li>_________________________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Conference Board of Canada study - $8,000 - $12,000 (5.9B) </li></ul><ul><li>Jeffrey Reitz study - $55 billion loss to economy </li></ul>
  15. 15. Globalization and racial discrimination <ul><li>Neo-liberal restructuring and demands for flexibility have made precarious employment the fastest growing forms of work - contract, temporary, part-time, piece meal, shift work or self-employment. And it has combined with historical racism discrimination in employment to make racialised groups more vulnerable in the Canadian economy </li></ul><ul><li>Characteristics of these types of employment include low pay, no job security, poor and often unsafe working conditions, intensive labour, excessive hours and low or no benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>Racialized workers and new immigrants are disproportionately over-represented in precarious work, as a consequence of their vulnerability. This translates into lower incomes and occupational status than other Canadians </li></ul>
  16. 16. Racial Discrimination in Employment <ul><li>Racial discrimination in Employment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical Racism and gendered racism in access to employment practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most jobs are filled through word of mouth reproducing existing networks and privileged access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Barriers to occupational mobility in workplace and among sectors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Barriers to access to professions and trades </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-recognition of international credentials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Devaluing human capital on basis of source country </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demands for Canadian experience </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. The Racialization of Poverty <ul><li>The Racialization of poverty is linked to the process of the deepening social exclusion of racialized and immigrant communities. </li></ul><ul><li>It represents a disproportionate and persistent experience of low income among racialized groups </li></ul><ul><li>A key contributing factor is the concentration of economic, social and political power in fewer hands that has emerged as the state has retreated from its regulatory role in the economy. </li></ul><ul><li>The experience of poverty includes powerlessness, marginalisation, voicelessness, vulnerability, and insecurity. </li></ul><ul><li>Different dimensions of the experience of poverty interact in important ways to reproduce and reinforce social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>This idea is well articulated using the discourse and framework of social exclusion. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Racialization of Poverty <ul><li>In 1995, the rate for racialized children under six living in low income families was 45 per cent - almost twice the overall figure of 26 per cent for all children living in Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1996, while racialized groups members accounted for 21.6 per cent of the urban population, they accounted for 33 per cent of the urban poor. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1996 36.8% of women and 35% of men in racialized communities were low-income earners, compared to 19.2% of other women and 16% of other men </li></ul><ul><li>In 1998, the family poverty rate for racialized groups was 19% compared to 10.4% for other Canadian families. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Low-income rates rise among successive groups of immigrants <ul><li>During the past two decades, low-income rates have increased among successive groups of recent immigrants </li></ul><ul><li>In 1980, 24.6% of immigrants who had arrived during the previous five-year period were below the poverty line. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1990, the low-income rate among recent immigrants had increased to 31.3%. </li></ul><ul><li>After peaking at 47.0% in 1995, the rate fell back to 35.8% in 2000. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Neighbourhood dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>In Canada’s urban areas, the spatial concentration of poverty or residential segregation is intensifying along racial lines </li></ul><ul><li>Immigrants in Toronto are more likely than non-immigrants to live in neighbourhoods with high rates of poverty </li></ul><ul><li>Young immigrants living in low income areas often struggle with alienation from their parents and community of origin, and from the broader society. They are disproportionate targets of criminalization. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Racialized neighbourhoods <ul><li>Toronto Area racialized enclaves experience high poverty rates </li></ul><ul><li> University unemployment low income lone parent </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese 21.2% 11.2% 28.4% 11.7% </li></ul><ul><li>South Asian 11.8% 13.1% 28.3% 17.6% </li></ul><ul><li>Black 8.7% 18.3% 48.5% 33.7% </li></ul>
  22. 22. Neighbourhood dimensions of Social Exclusion <ul><li>One way to understand the increase in various forms of violence, including the explosion of gun violence among youth in low income neighbourhoods in Toronto are the high levels of marginalization, hopelessness and powerlessness brought about by the economic restructuring of these neighbourhoods, allowing for conditions under which generalized violence can thrive. </li></ul><ul><li>Research of community violence suggests that it is largely a function of social breakdown pertaining to social inequality. It represents a nihilism that arises out of the disconnection and distorted evaluation of the worth of human life that emerges in conditions of despair, powerlessness, and hopelessness in some socially excluded environments. </li></ul><ul><li>Young racialized group members who grow up in these conditions are often caught up in a culture of alienation both from their parents and community of origin, and from the broader society. </li></ul><ul><li>But these neighbourhoods also have a complex role as communities for their immigrant and racialized residents by providing a space in which a sense of belonging is created. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Social exclusion and the Criminal Justice System <ul><li>Racialized group members and immigrant communities have historically been racially profiled as dangerous foreigners. </li></ul><ul><li>In the Post-September 11 period, national security has been constructed in ways that have led to the racial profiling and targeting of certain racialized groups - Muslims, Arabs and West Asians, South Asians </li></ul><ul><li>Low income, marginal communities tend to bear the brunt of the law and order agenda of the neo-liberal era mostly through targeted policing. </li></ul><ul><li>Immigrants and racialized groups being over represented in those communities are subjected to a process of criminalization. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Social Exclusion and Health <ul><li>Discrimination in the health care system is characterized by: </li></ul><ul><li>-language barriers </li></ul><ul><li>-lack of cultural sensitivity </li></ul><ul><li>-absence of cultural competencies </li></ul><ul><li>-barriers to access of health services </li></ul><ul><li>-inadequate funding for community health services </li></ul><ul><li>The psychological pressures of daily resisting racism and other forms of oppression add up to a complex of factors that undermine the health status of racialized and immigrant group members. </li></ul><ul><li>Many racialized and immigrant workers are forced to accept work in workplaces where they face poor and sometimes hazardous working conditions that compromises their health. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Racism and Mental Health <ul><li>Many racialized group members and immigrants with mental health issues and mental illness' identify racism as a critical issue in their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the reasons the health status of immigrants declines is because of the experiences of dealing with everyday forms of racism. </li></ul><ul><li>A study conducted by Noh and Beiser confirms that Southeast Asian refugees in Canada reporting discrimination experienced higher depression than their counterparts who reported none. </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled immigrants experiencing mounting barriers in gaining employment and access to civil society, also report impacts on their mental health (Beiser, 1988) </li></ul>
  26. 26. Social Exclusion: Implications for Social policy <ul><li>The social exclusion framework can be a basis for identifying barriers to access and equity in addressing structural inequalities and barriers to full participation. </li></ul><ul><li>A multidimensional approach to confronting the problems of social exclusion . </li></ul><ul><li>Naming the processes that perpetuate structures of inequality and social exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on communities in distress and the needs of all excluded groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering excluded groups to become active participants reversing exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>A multi agency response that mobilizes all relevant actors </li></ul><ul><li>Structuring policy interventions around a life cycle approach, where necessary to meet both individual and community development needs </li></ul><ul><li>Fighting discrimination and oppressions in their various, often intersecting dimensions </li></ul><ul><li>Using Community based research as a basis for policy formulation </li></ul>

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