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Mentoring Presentation May 05
 

Mentoring Presentation May 05

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    Mentoring Presentation May 05 Mentoring Presentation May 05 Presentation Transcript

    • Choosing the Right Mentor and the Right Academic Job Digestive Diseases Week James L. Madara, MD Sara & Harold Lincoln Thompson Distinguished Service Professor & Dean Biological Sciences Division & The Pritzker School of Medicine Vice President for Medical Affairs May 18, 2005 University of Chicago
    • Finding the Right Mentor: Characteristics of Mentors
      • Share interests and projects 1
      • Chemistry
      • Define expectations of the mentoring relationship 2
      • Provide availability and accessibility 2
      • Recognize mentees’ independence and are generous in providing credit for their contributions 2
      • Remain open to mentees’ concerns about performance, collegial interactions, and the workplace environment 2
      1. Medical College of Wisconsin Mentor Program. Accessed at http://www.mcw.edu/display/router.asp?docid=1130 , April 11, 2005. 2. UC Davis School of Medicine: Mentoring Program Guide for Selecting a Mentor and Establishing a Mentoring Relationship. Available at http://med-acaffairs.ucdavis.edu/development/Mentor_Guides.htm
    • Finding the Right Mentor: Why a Mentor Is Needed
      • Navigating a new environment
      • Translating academic heritage (promotions, etc)
      • Intellectual sounding-board
      • Compass reference at times of confusion
      • A champion of your career
      • Protection of an investment (from an institutional/dean’s perspective)
    • Finding the Right Mentor: How to Find the “Right” Mentor
      • Understand your aspiration for a mentor
      • Evaluate the mentors
        • Are they available, successful, approachable, well connected both within and outside the institution, and willing to invest time in you?
      • Recognize that more than one mentor may be needed
      • Explicitly state your role in the mentoring relationship and your recognition of the mentor’s contributions to your career development (conversation not interview)
      UC Davis School of Medicine: Mentoring Program Guide for Selecting a Mentor and Establishing a Mentoring Relationship. Available at http://med-acaffairs.ucdavis.edu/development/Mentor_Guides.htm
    • Finding the Right Mentor: What the Mentor Provides
      • Constructive and timely feedback 1
      • Monitor mentees’ academic process 2
      • Direct mentees to appropriate channels for resolving and advancing professional issues 2
      • Advocate for mentees and provide professional exposure 2
      • Alert mentees to appropriate career opportunities in education, skills workshops, funding, etc 2
      • Seriously review mentees’ academic product
      1. Medical College of Wisconsin Mentor Program. Accessed at http://www.mcw.edu/display/router.asp?docid=1130 , April 11, 2005. 2. UC Davis School of Medicine: Mentoring Program Guide for Selecting a Mentor and Establishing a Mentoring Relationship. Available at http://med-acaffairs.ucdavis.edu/development/Mentor_Guides.htm
    • Finding the Right Mentor: What You Owe Your Mentor
      • Meet regularly in a fashion which honors his/her style and schedule
        • Share aspirations and challenges
        • Aim for a professional, collegial relationship (not an emotionally needy one)
      • Seek continuous feedback
      • Be nondefensive
      • Take initiative
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Wants and Direction
      • What is most fulfilling to you
      • What are the actual cadences of such careers
      • Think of the 35-year period of the career but:
        • Recognize flexibility in our field
      • Identify and evaluate those who have established like careers
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: How to Think About Risks
      • Many advise broad training
        • “Buys” insurance
        • However: Less focused and longer duration
      • Do you know what you love?
        • If not, try to define ASAP
        • If so, go with it
      • Principle: In biomedicine, career “insurance” may simply lower your chances of being immersed in what you love. Don’t worry that if you are not broadly trained, you will risk driving a cab—it’s not going to happen.
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Setting Goals
      • Immerse yourself (But recognize: marathon, not sprint)
      • Most careers are a blend of planning and the stochastic (Be attentive to opportunity)
      • Realistically appraise personal elements and consequences (Be proactive in taking account of such)
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Setting Goals (continued)
      • Trust instinctual senses
      • Search for those at the institution being considered who have like aspirations, career phenotypes (Are they successful? Are they attractive colleagues?)
      • Identify potential mentors
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Importance of the Department Chair
      • Does the Chair value your career type? (Attention to actions, objectivity here)
      • Does the Institution reflect the Chair’s values?
      • Has the Chair had a career phenotype like that you aspire to?
      • Do those of your career phenotype do well in the setting?
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Importance of the Department Chair (continued)
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Importance of the Department Chair (continued)
      • Is the “job description” defined? (If not, is that due to your vagueness)
      • The “Madara rule” (If two people are hit by a bus…)
      • What if leadership is turning over soon? (Risk exists, analyze institutional nature)
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: The Package
      • Resources: Not just money and space (Intellectual resources often overlooked, often are the most important)
      • Time resources: Is there a plan to use it well and a fertile environment for such (If not, it will dissipate)
      • Salary: AAMC data exist
        • Benefits: Not the deciding factor/not to be overlooked
        • At-risk component: Who decides and how?
        • Malpractice: Is this in your P&L? Is investigation so “taxed”?
        • Clinical: Is there a reasonable period of protection?
        • Research: What are the salary recovery expectations?
      • Space (investigative):
        • Dry—more predictable
        • Wet—400 to 1000 sq ft
          • Policies of space distribution
          • Meaning to you
        • Consider Cores
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: The Package (continued)
      • Nonsalary $:
        • Dry—computation sufficiency/variable
        • Wet—$300K to $1 million over 3 to 4 years (± unrecovered salary accounts partly for wide spread)
      • Other:
        • Clinical versus Basic Science Departments
        • Access to students
        • Record of Postdocs
        • Access to training grants
        • Cores
      • PhD:
        • Clinical versus Basic Science Departments (Evaluate Institution, remember Madara rule)
        • AAMC data exist
    • Finding the Right Academic Job: Job Search Process
      • First Visit: View as first date (Focus on fit, not detail)
        • Importance of seminar
        • Recognize interview/interviewee mix
        • Help set up day(s)
        • Bidirectional analysis of colleagues
        • Meeting the PM challenge
        • Follow-up
      • Second Visit: Now we’re serious
        • Try to identify the “closet”
        • Resources (often Chair at visit’s end)
        • Negotiation
          • Prepare overview
          • Know why a resource is needed
          • Think “business plan,” get it right the first time
          • Recognize your accountabilities
            • Ask for mentoring committee
          • Never exclude significant other(s) from this visit
          • Evaluate personal elements (housing, schools)
      • Other
        • A pre-first visit
        • A third visit
      • Differences in Academic Medical Centers
        • When you’ve seen one, you’ve seen one
        • Applies to promotions
      • Study criteria for evaluation/promotion
        • Attend workshops if given
        • Reality test published criteria
      • Be pro-active
        • ie, Letters of support required in five years? Is there a Departmental seminar series?
      Finding the Right Academic Job: Understanding the Future
      • Other: Women and underrepresented minorities
        • Assure the environment is healthy; is there a venue for fellowship
        • Watch out for over-participation in administrative areas (What you need trumps what others need in this area; good citizenship does not require that you do more than others)
      • Other: Adapting to a new environment
        • Be flexible; when “closet” opens, expect it
        • Begin with benefit of doubt extended to others
        • Assure there is enjoyment; life is too short
      Finding the Right Academic Job: Understanding the Future (continued)
    • Summary
      • Academic Careers: a good choice
      • Success requires your input:
        • Not just in clinical care/research
        • In identifying mentoring system
        • In biasing toward promotion
        • In displaying pragmatism and practicality
      • Put yourself in others’ shoes:
        • Your Chair
        • Your colleagues, particularly during tense times
        • Your significant other