• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Houston Area Survey
 

Houston Area Survey

on

  • 773 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
773
Views on SlideShare
770
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

http://www.slideshare.net 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Houston Area Survey Houston Area Survey Presentation Transcript

    • MAKING SENSE OF OUR TIMES: Tracking the Economic and Demographic Changes Through 26 Years of Houston Surveys STEPHEN L. KLINEBERG The Latest Findings from the Houston Area Survey March 2007
      • Supported by foundations, corporations, and individuals,
      • the annual surveys have now interviewed 26 scientifically
      • selected representative samples of Harris County residents.
      • In May 1982, just two months after the first Houston survey
      • was completed, the 80-year oil boom suddenly collapsed.
      • The region recovered from deep and prolonged recession
      • in the mid 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of . . .
            • a restructured economy and
            • a demographic revolution.
      • These are the same transformations that have refashioned
      • American society itself in recent years. For more than a
      • quarter-century, the Houston Area Survey has tracked the
      • public’s changing perspectives on these remarkable trends.
      THE HOUSTON AREA SURVEY (1982-2007)
    • FIGURE 1: POSITIVE RATINGS OF JOB OPPOR-TUNITIES IN THE HOUSTON AREA (1982-2007)
    • FIGURE 2: NEGATIVE RATINGS OF JOB OP-PORTUNITIES IN RELATION TO THE OFFI- CIAL UNEMPLOYMENT RATES (1982-2007)
    • THE RESTRUCTURED ECONOMY
      • The resource-based industrial-era economy has now re-
      • ceded into history. It has been replaced by an increasingly
      • high-tech, worldwide, knowledge-based economic system.
      • The traditional “blue collar path” to financial security has
      • largely disappeared. Most good-paying jobs today require
      • high levels of technical skills and educational credentials.
      • In the 2006 survey, 77% disagreed that “a high school
      • education is enough to get a good job.” In 2007, 61% of
      • area residents agreed that “there are very few good jobs in
      • today’s economy for people without a college education.”
      • In the new, increasingly unequal, knowledge-based econ-
      • omy, “What you earn depends on what you have learned.”
    • FIGURE 3: CONCERNS ABOUT HEALTH CARE, POVERTY, AND INEQUALITY (1997-2007)
    • FIGURE 4: CHANGES IN TWO MEASURES OF THE WORK ETHIC (1982-2007)
        • Houston's prospects will now increasingly depend on the
        • city’s ability to attract and retain the nation’s most skilled and
        • creative “knowledge workers” and high-tech companies.
        • This will require significant and sustained improvements in . . .
        • the region’s mobility and traffic congestion
            • the revitalization and preservation of downtown areas
            • the variety of its venues for sports, arts, and culture
            • the enhancement of its parks, trees, and bayous
            • the richness of its hiking, boating, and birding areas
            • the quality of its air and water
      THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE
      • The public’s support for new initiatives along these lines has
      • grown continuously and significantly across the years.
    • FIGURE 5: AIR POLLUTION CONCERNS IN THE HOUSTON AREA (1995-2007)
    • FIGURE 6: ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS AND TRADEOFFS (THE 2007 SURVEY)
    • FIGURE 7: “WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE HOUSTON AREA TODAY?” (1982-2007)
    • FIGURE 8: RATINGS OF THE HOUSTON AREA IN GENERAL AS A PLACE TO LIVE (2005, 2007)
    • FIGURE 9: ASSESSMENTS OF TRAFFIC IN THE HOUSTON AREA AND OF THREE POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS (2003, 2005, 2007)
    • FIGURE 10: “HOW WORRIED ARE YOU THAT YOU OR A FAMILY MEMBER WILL BECOME THE VICTIM OF A CRIME?” (1995-2007)
    • FIGURE 11: SUPPORT FOR ALTERNATIVES TO THE DEATH PENALTY (1999-2007)
    • FIGURE 12: THE IMPORTANCE OF DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT, BY HOME ZIP CODE (1995-2007)
    • FIGURE 13: PERCENT OF ANGLOS “VERY IN-TERESTED” IN MOVING FROM SUBURBS TO CITY AND FROM CITY TO SUBURBS (1999-2007)
    • FIGURE 14: ASSESSMENTS OF POPULATION GROWTH AND URBAN PLANNING (2007 SURVEY)
    • THE DEMOGRAPHIC REVOLUTION
      • Along with the major immigration capitals of L.A. and N.Y.,
      • closely following upon Miami, San Francisco, and Chicago,
      • Houston is at the forefront of the new ethnic diversity that is
      • refashioning the socio-political landscape of urban America.
        • Throughout all of its history . . .
            • this was essentially a bi-racial Southern city,
            • dominated and controlled, in an automatic, taken-
        • for-granted way, by white men.
        • Today . . .
            • Houston is one of the most culturally diverse metro-politan areas in the country, and
            • all of its ethnic communities are now “minorities.”
    • FIGURE 15 : THE DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSFOR-MATIONS OF HARRIS COUNTY (1960-2005) Source: U.S. Census ( www.census.gov ); classifications based on Texas State Data Center conventions; total populations are given in parentheses; *from the 2005 American Community Study, households only.
    • INTERACTIONS OF ETHNICITY AND AGE
      • The other demographic revolution: the remarkable “aging,”
      • or “graying,” of the American population.
      • Today’s seniors are primarily Anglos, as are the 76 million
      • Americans born between 1946 and 1964, now aged 42 to 60.
      • In the next 30 years , the numbers over age 65 will double.
      • The younger populations who will replace the “baby boom”
      • are disproportionately non-Anglo and far less privileged.
      • The “aging of America” is thus almost as much a division
      • along economic and ethnic lines as along generational lines.
      • Nowhere is this ongoing transformation more clearly seen
      • than in the age distributions of the Harris County population.
    • FIGURE 16: THE PROPORTIONS IN FOUR AGE GROUPS WHO ARE ANGLO, BLACK, LATINO, AND ASIAN OR OTHER (2002-2006, COMBINED)
    • FIGURE 17: EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT IN FIVE HOUSTON COMMUNITIES (1994-2006)
    • FIGURE 18: POSITIVE RATINGS OVER THE YEARS OF “THE RELATIONS AMONG ETHNIC GROUPS IN THE HOUSTON AREA” (1992-2007)
    • FIGURE 19: ATTITUDES TOWARD HOUSTON’S INCREASING ETHNIC DIVERSITY (1994–2007)
    • FIGURE 20: CHANGING PERSPECTIVES ON THE NEW IMMIGRATION (1995–2007)
    • FIGURE 21: ATTITUDES TOWARD “ILLEGAL” IMMIGRATION (FROM THE 2007 SURVEY)
    • FIGURE 22: PERSPECTIVES ON ABORTION RIGHTS (HOUSTON AREA SURVEY, 1990-2007)
    • FIGURE 23: PERSPECTIVES ON HOMOSEXU-ALITY (HOUSTON AREA SURVEY, 1991-2007)
    • FIGURE 24: ATTITUDES TOWARD OTHER “SOCIAL AGENDA” ISSUES (THE 2007 SURVEY)
    • FIGURE 25: PERSPECTIVES ON MENTAL ILLNESS (FROM THE 2004 AND 2007 SURVEYS)
    • FIGURE 26: INTERETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN BELIEFS ABOUT EQUALITY OF OPPORTU-NITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY TODAY (2006)
    • FIGURE 27: CHANGING PERSPECTIVES ON THE AMERICAN FUTURE (1988-2007)
    • FIGURE 28: PARTY PREFERENCES AMONG HARRIS COUNTY RESIDENTS (1988-2007)
      • On 29 September 2005, thousands of hurricane evacuees
      • began arriving at the Reliant Complex and the GRB. Some
      • 60,000 Houstonians came out to help, providing unexpected
      • evidence of civic engagement in a city where measures of
      • community connectedness (“social capital”) are generally low.
      • There were unusually favorable stories in the national media;
      • and in January 2006, The Dallas Morning News , despite time-
      • honored rivalries, named Houston as the “Texan of the Year.”
      • But by mid October, concerns were already rapidly mounting,
      • primarily with regard to the strain on public services (on area
      • schools, hospitals, and the criminal justice system); and most
      • of the newcomers were showing little interest in going home.
      KATRINA IN TWO PHASES: FROM CIVIC PRIDE TO “COMPASSION FATIGUE”?
    • FIGURE 29: PERCEPTIONS OF THE EFFECTS ON HOUSTON OF THE EVACUEES (HAS, 2006)
    • FIGURE 30: SUMMARY ASSESSMENTS OF THE KATRINA EXPERIENCE (2006-2007)
    • CAN THE CIVIC ENERGY MOBILIZED BY KATRINA BE RECAPTURED TO MEET HOUSTON’S CENTRAL CHALLENGES?
      • This city and nation will need to nurture a far more educated
      • workforce, and fashion policies that can reduce the growing
      • inequalities and prevent the rise of a new urban underclass.
      • To attract the most innovative companies and talented indi-
      • viduals, Houston will need to become a more environmen-
      • tally appealing urban destination, and develop the research
      • centers that will fuel the new engines of economic growth.
      • If the region is to flourish in the 21st century, it will need to
      • grow into a more inclusive multiethnic society, one with true
      • equality of opportunity, where all communities are invited to
      • participate as full partners in shaping the Houston future.
    • Professor Stephen L. Klineberg Department of Sociology, MS-28 Rice University, P. O. Box 1892 Houston, Texas 77251-1892 Telephone: 713-348-3484 or 713-665-2010 email address: [email_address] Web: www.houstonareasurvey.org For additional copies of the 2005 report, call Rice University at: 713-348-4225. CONTACT INFORMATION