Governor’S Council Stratagic Plan
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Governor’S Council Stratagic Plan

on

  • 923 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
923
Views on SlideShare
922
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Governor’S Council Stratagic Plan Governor’S Council Stratagic Plan Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • Oklahoma’s Advantage “ GROWING OUR OWN”
  • Governor’s Council Strategic Plan
    • Vision
    • Oklahoma HAS a competitive advantage through integrated workforce and economic development objectives
    • Mission
    • ADVANCES demand-driven workforce and economic development systems
    • Result ACHIEVES wealth-creation for business, individuals, and communities throughout Oklahoma
  • Guiding Principles For Creating Oklahoma’s Competitive Advantage
    • Oklahoma Will Always ----
    • Know its status relative to changing employer and workforce conditions due to globalization, new science, technology, and demographics.
    • Have a competitive labor pool that addresses the quality needs of current and anticipated industry clusters and employer groups.
    • Command a strong base of public awareness and support for workforce and economic development issues and initiatives, including education.
    • Work through collaborative systems of policy-governance, benchmarking, evaluation, and rewards.
  • OKLAHOMA YOUTH COUNCIL
  • Oklahoma’s Advantage The beginning of a new day…
  • What’s at Stake?
    • For Business
      • Expansion
      • Quality workforce
    • For Oklahomans
      • Higher wages
      • Quality Jobs
      • Better standard of living
    • For Communities
      • Population growth
      • Economic vitality
      • Oklahoma’s reputation
  • Issues
    • Baby Boomers are will be retiring at an increasingly rapid pace for the next 15 years
    • Potential shortage of 10 million workers by 2010
    • Only significant source for additional skilled workers is from immigration
    • Homeland Security issues are currently problematic for immigration
    • Skills Gaps: Mismatch of worker skills and job profiles
    • Increased diversity of the workforce will create language and cultural challenges
  • WHAT MATTERS TO YOU, NOW?
    • THE RIGHT WORKERS WITH THE RIGHT SKILLS FOR THE RIGHT JOB-----IN YOUR REGION!
  • Oklahoma Solutions
    • Industry Sector Studies
    • Career Management System
    • Career Readiness Certificate
    • Workforce Board Development/ Certification
    • State Partnership Agreement
    • Talent development strategies
    • Grow Our Own
    • ADVANTAGE CENTERS
    • Existing Worker Training
    • State Youth Council for Workforce Initiatives
  • Issues
    • Worker Shortages
    • Skills Shortages
  • Annual employment growth, projected 2004-2014 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 1.30%-1.50% 1.20%-1.29% 1.11%-1.19% 0.98%-1.10%
  • From 1994-2004, OK met its employment demand largely by population growth… Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau Average annual growth in employment and working age population, 1994-2004 Percent
  • … but also by increased labor force participation Oklahoma United States Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Non-metro Oklahoma may have an advantage: an untapped labor supply Source: U.S. Census Bureau
  • Issues
    • Worker Shortages
    • Skills Shortages
    • The Knowledge Economy
    • “ Because technological advances have freed up companies from traditional business costs,
    • knowledge , skills , and experience
    • embodied in individuals
    • have become more valuable than capital equipment and even capital itself.”
    • - James Irvine Foundation
  • IT IS A NEW DAY
    • Old – Industrial Economy
      • Economies of scale
        • (lower unit costs)
      • Cheap labor & land
        • (keep input costs as low as possible)
      • Access to natural resources for product input
        • (inputs had greatest transportation costs)
    • New – Knowledge Economy
        • Smaller niches in global marketplace
          • (little fish, but big pond)
      • Knowledge labor applying technology-based solutions
        • (heads not hands)
      • Entrepreneurial emphasis ( creativity, innovation, & flexibility key)
    • Skill Requirements are Increasing
    • --Jobs are smarting up
    • • Need broader array of skills
    • • Need for continuous upgrading of technical
    • --Changing workplace organization •Teamwork, creativity, problem- solving, adaptability
    • --Technology
    • • Training needed to adapt to new technologies
    • --Increased need for basic skills and strong work ethic
    • • Strong academics skills for ALL!!!!
    • • Motivation and responsibility
    • • Self-esteem and confidence
    • Chart source: Council on Competitiveness
    What’s changing?
  • • Labor Market – Enhanced Mobility of People – Loss of internal career paths and company commitments – Cultural barriers • Increased inequality – Wages related to educational attainment • Chart Source: Council on Competitiveness WHAT’S CHANGING?
    • OKLAHOMA EMPLOYER SURVEYS
    • 2004 – 78%
    • NEEDED WORKERS WITH HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
    • 2006 – 71%
    • SEE INCREASE IN NEED FOR WORKERS WITH POST-SECONDARY CREDENTIAL OR DEGREE
  • Source: National Association of Manufacturers – The skills gap 2004 Why are manufacturers rejecting job applicants?
    • Inadequate basic employability skills – 69%
    • Inadequate reading/writing skills – 32%
    • Inadequate math skills – 21%
    • Inadequate oral communications skills- 17.5%
  • Source: National Association of Manufacturers – The Skills Gap 2004 Most Serious Skill Deficiencies Current Employees
    • Poor basic employability skills – 59%
    • Poor reading/writing skills – 32%
    • Inadequate math skills – 26%
    • Inability to communicate verbally- 25%
  • PRODUCTIVITY RISES WITH EDUCATION
    • When education level is increased one-year, productivity rises:
        • Manufacturing workers: 8.0%
        • Non-manufacturing workers: 13%
    • When average educational attainment is increased by 10% (about one grade level):
        • Firms experience a 8.6% rise in productivity
        • National Center on the Educational Quality of the Workforce
  • Source: Forecasts from Regional Dynamics, calculated by CREC 100.0% 100.0% $44,837 30,016,818 174,132,926 Total 34.4% 36.3% $25,275 10,312,306 63,244,115 Less than HS Degree 17.7% 21.8% $38,055 5,300,947 37,931,763 HS or GED for Entry 11.2% 13.3% $50,040 3,352,418 23,161,040 HS or GED & Some Experience 11.1% 8.4% $49,305 3,319,873 14,680,694 Tech-Some Post 20.6% 16.5% $80,623 6,171,171 28,672,368 4-year College Degree 5.2% 3.7% $88,639 1,559,103 6,442,947 Advanced Degree % New Jobs (2007-2017) % Total Employment (2007) Average Earnings 2007 Net New Jobs (2007-2017) Projected Employment 2007 Educational Band USA Projected Employment By Education Level
  • Oklahoma must ensure potential workers obtain the training necessary to succeed Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 15 U.S. industries projected to ADD jobs the fastest through 2014*
    • * Among industries with more than 100,000 employees
    Business services 3. Management consulting services 5. Facilities support services 6. EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 7. Office administrative services 13. Accounting, tax, & payroll services High-tech services 2. Software publishers 8. Computer systems design Health and social services 1. Home health care services 4. Residential care facilities 9. Outpatient & laboratory services 10. Child day care services 12. Offices of health practitioners 15. Rehabilitation services Education services 11. Other educational services 14. Colleges & universities Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 15 U.S. industries projected to SHED jobs the fastest through 2014*
    • * Among industries with more than 100,000 employees
    Nondurable manufacturing 1. Cut and sew apparel mfg. 2. Fabric mills 3. Basic chemical mfg. 6. Rubber product mfg. 8. Synthetic materials mfg. 13. Pulp & paper mills 14. Petroleum & coal mfg. Durable manufacturing 4. Industry machinery mfg. 5. Electrical equipment mfg. 7. Foundries 10. Computer mfg. 12. Metalworking machinery mfg. 15. Other machinery mfg. Natural resources 9. Sawmills & wood preservation 11. Crop production Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • U.S. and Oklahoma job growth is projected to be fastest among high-paying occupations Projected Annual Job Growth by Average Pay Through 2012 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Oklahoma City is projected to have a higher share of the long-term job growth Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Percent
  • SHIFT IN THINKING
    • FROM: OKLAHOMA HAS WONDERFUL, PRODUCTIVE WORKERS WITH A STRONG WORK ETHIC…
    • TO: OKLAHOMA HAS A HIGHLY SKILLED PRODUCTIVE WORKFORCE WITH A STRONG WORK ETHIC
  • Economic Development Depends on Talent Development and Management: How do we get it?
    • Recruit it
    • Retain it - Graduate Retention
    • Develop it / Grow our Own
    • Education/ Training Pipeline
      • Demand Driven education system
      • Demand occupations
      • Industry sector development
  • Percent 93-94 Oklahoma 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College ( percent ) 100% 42% 76% 30% Fall 1997 College Freshmen
  • 93-94 Oklahoma 9 th Grader’s Progression into High School and College ( number ) 100% 76% 42% 30% Fall 1997 College Freshmen
  • IMPLICATIONS FOR YOUNG OKLAHOMANS
    • ACE (END OF INSTRUCTION TESTS ARE THE LAW)
    • WITH INTERVENTION STRATEGIES
    • WITHOUT INTERVENTION
    • WHATEVER IT TAKES
    • TUTORING, SUMMER, REPEATING, ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL, APPLIED COURSES,
    • THE ALLIANCE, OHLAP, GEAR UP, YEAR 13, SCHOLARSHIPS, ACADEMIES, (PRE-ENGINEERING, ADV. MFG, HEALTH, CONSTRUCTION, BIO-TECH,
    • GETTING READY! O-3, 3-6, 1 ST – 3 RD , 4 TH – 6 TH , 7 TH – 8 TH , 9 TH , 10 TH – 13 TH (GED PLUS POST SECONDARY)
    • OKLAHOMA’S CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE
    • - OCRC
    • READY FOR COLLEGE, FOR WORK, LIFE
  • Measuring up: National Report Card on Higher Education (2004)
    • Oklahoma has made notable improvements over the past decade in preparing young people for higher education.
    • However, the state’s performance is weak in providing students with an affordable higher education, which may undermine its efforts to send clear messages to them about the importance of being prepared academically for college.
  • Measuring up: National Report Card on Higher Education (2004)
    • Oklahoma has had a substantial decline in the percentage of working-age adults enrolling in college-level education.
    • A smaller proportion of high school students enroll immediately in college.
    • POST SECONDARY EDUCATION INCLUDES CAREER TECH APPLIED CREDENTIALS
    • HEALTH CAREERS, ADV. MFG., FAST TRACK
  • Linear Movement of 2004 Oklahoma High School Graduates into Oklahoma Public & Private Colleges by County of Origin
  • Remediation Rates of 2004 Oklahoma High School Graduates as Fall 2004 Freshmen in Oklahoma Public Higher Education
  • Remediation Rates of 2004 Oklahoma High School Graduates as Fall 2004 Freshmen in Oklahoma Public Higher Education
  • State Per Capita Personal Income v. Share of Adult Population with Bachelor's Degree or Higher (2004) From 2000 to 2004, Oklahoma increased in the number of bachelor’s degrees for Oklahomans age 25 and older from 20.2 to 22.2 and from 47th to 42nd in the state rankings . NV MT ID LA AL TN IN KY AR MS WV CT MA DC NM SD TX NE OR KS UT CA HI MN NY WA VT CO NH VA MD NJ ND IA OH WY GA FL ME RI AK DE IL AZ SC NC MO MI PA WI OK
  • State Population Age 25 Years and Older with Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, 2004 22.2 23.6 33.7 25.6 28.3 24.3 21.5
  • EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES REPORT
  • EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES REPORT
  • EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES REPORT
    • “ Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today.  Teach a man to fish; and you have fed him for a lifetime” —Author unknown
    • Average Salary of 1999-00 Bachelor Degree Holders After Five Years:
    • Engineering ($49,150)
    • Computer Science ($47,568)
    • Transportation ($46,738)
    • Health professions ($44,773)
    • Engineering technologies ($41,537).
  • Which of the following satisfaction measures were found to be correlated to Academic success?
    • 1. Classroom Instruction
    • 2. Number and Variety of Course Offerings
    • 3. Grading Practices and Policies
    • 4. Number and kinds of tests given
    • 5. Guidance Services provided by Guidance Office
    • 6. School Rules, Regulations and Policies
    • 7. Library or Learning Center
    • 8. Laboratory Facilities
    • 9. Provisions for Special Help in Reading, Math, etc
    • 10. Provisions for Academically Outstanding Students
    • 11. Adequacy of Programs in Career Education Planning
    • 12. Overall Rating of High School
  • Which of the following satisfaction measures were found to be correlated to Academic success?
    • 1. Classroom Instruction
    • 2. Number and Variety of Course Offerings
    • 3. Grading Practices and Policies
    • 4. Number and kinds of tests given
    • 5. Guidance Services provided by Guidance Office
    • 6. School Rules, Regulations and Policies
    • 7. Library or Learning Center
    • 8. Laboratory Facilities
    • 9. Provisions for Special Help in Reading, Math, etc
    • 10. Provisions for Academically Outstanding Students
    • 11. Adequacy of Programs in Career Education Planning
    • 12. Overall Rating of High School
    • Enable people with at least two years of college to finish a bachelor’s degree
    • Flexible and accelerated schedule to meet the needs of working adults
    • Curriculum designed to ensure that students are prepared to succeed in the workplace
    Adult Degree Completion Program Program Design
    • Involve multiple learning environments.
    • Common curriculum and offered at multiple locations.
    • Developed by faculty from participating universities.
    • Will be approved through academic processes.
    • There will be a greater need to:
    • Upgrade the skills of workers at all levels: existing, transition, emerging workers
    • Retrain middle income existing workers
    • Upgrade skills of low wage and low-skilled workers
    • Retrain middle age and seniors
    • Retrain AND REEMPLOY dislocated workers
    • Retain and Retrain Exiting Military
    • There will be a greater need to:
    • Retrain retirees
    • Continuous development of innovative skills through lifelong learning
    • Increase percent of disabled workers
    • Transition offenders into workforce
    • Increase of dropouts recovered and high school completion success
  • Desired State:
    • The State of Oklahoma will have a labor pool which is:
    • Competitive: SKILLED, HEALTHY
    • Advances the economic objectives of the state and local communities,
    • Meets the employment interests of industry clusters and employer groups.
  • 1970’s 1990’s 2010
  • Implications
    • Application, application, application
      • Of Math
      • Of Science
    • New technologies
    • Current and emerging Industries
      • Aerospace/ Manufacturing/ Energy/ Health Care
      • Biotechnology/ Nanotechnology
  • 21 st Century Curriculum
    • Analytical and problem solving skills
    • Business organization and environment
    • Communications skills
    • Core hardware/ Software computer skills
    • Project and process flows
    • Content (engineering, accounting etc.)
    • Oklahoma State of the Workforce Report
  • 21 st Century Employability Skills
    • Communication
    • Organization
    • Team contribution and leadership
    • Team collaboration
    • Critical thinking and decision making
    • Self-directed and continuous learning
    • Customer relations
    • State of the Workforce Report
  • SOFT OR JOB SUCCESS SKILLS
    • SOCIAL SKILLS IN THE WORKPLACE
    • APPROPRIATE WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR
    • ANGER MANAGEMENT
    • TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING AND WELLNESS AS FACTORS IN JOB SECURITY
    • AVOIDING DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOR
    • COMMUNICATION SKILLS
    • PROBLEM SOLVING AND FLEXIBILITY
  • Results
    • Connecting the dots between workforce and economic development across all levels so that we -
    • LEAVE NO WORKER BEHIND!
  • Retain & attract more graduates Produce more graduates Partner with business Attract new, high-quality businesses Employ graduates
  • OUR YOUTH COUNCIL ISSUES
    • DECREASING THE MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE
    • GREATER LEARNING SUCCESS
    • INCREASE THE NUMBER OF YOUTH PREPARED FOR HIGH DEMAND/HIGH SKILLED JOBS
    • SUCCESSFUL INTERVENTION STRATEGIES THROUGH YEAR 13
    • INCREASE GRADUATE RETENTION RATES
    • EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT IN EDUCATION
    • COMMIT TO FACT BASED DECISION MAKING
    • TWO-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN (3 PRONG)