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  • 1. WORKFORCE 2010-2020 Board of Trustees’ Retreat November 16, 2004
  • 2. “ We cannot produce twenty-first century knowledge workers in nineteenth century public school, early-twentieth century higher education institutions, or mid-twentieth century federal job training programs.” Workforce 2020
  • 3. Overview
    • Forces shaping the workforce landscape
    • U.S. & Minnesota Jobs
    • Models and tools for assessing higher education response
    • Next steps
  • 4. Components for Future of Minnesota Workforce Future POPULATION TRENDS Workforce Needs Education
  • 5. Forces Shaping The American Economy
    • Rapid technological change
    • Global integration – the rest of the world matters; outsourcing will continue
    • Rapid economic growth in certain nations
    • Deregulation and liberalization
    • Demographic change
    • Technological change - automation
  • 6. Rising To The Challenges Of Workforce 2020
    • Labor market will demand highly educated workers
    • Low skilled jobs that can be done elsewhere will disappear in U.S.
    • New technology and global competition will create unprecedented volatility in the world of work
    • Work environments will improve
    • Workplace will be increasingly diverse
  • 7. Will There Be A Skills Gap?
    • Skill levels in language, mathematics, and reasoning development need improvement
    • Productivity and quality of life dependent on a more highly skilled, educated workforce
    • Declining jobs, declining skill levels
    • Expanding occupations, high skills
  • 8.
    • What are the effects of these trends that you witness in your business or other areas of your life?
  • 9. Trends in Occupations
  • 10. The 10 Occupations With The Largest Job Growth, 2002-12 Percent & Education Or Training
    • Registered nurses
    • Postsecondary teachers
    • Retail salespersons
    • Customer service representative
    • Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food
    • Cashiers, except gaming
    • Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners
    • General and operations managers
    • Waiters and waitresses
    • Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants
    • 27% Associate degree
    • 38% Doctoral degree
    • 15% Short-term on-the-job training
    • 24% Moderate-term on-the-job training
    • 23% Short-term on-the-job training
    • 18% Short-term on-the-job training
    • 13% Short-term on-the-job training
    • 8. 18% Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience
    • 9. 18% Short-term on-the-job training
    • 10. 25% Short-term on-the-job training
    Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 11. Fastest Growing Occupations 2000-2012
    • Medical assistants
    • Network systems and data communications analysts
    • Physician assistants
    • Social and human service assistants
    • Home health aides
    • Medical records and health information technicians
    • Physical therapist aides
    • Computer software engineers, applications
    • Computer software engineers, systems software
    • Physical therapist assistants
    • Fitness trainers and aerobics instructors
    • Database administrators
    • Veterinary technologists and technicians
    • Hazardous materials removal workers
    • Dental hygienists
    • Occupational therapist aides
    • Dental assistants
    • Personal and home care aides
    • Self-enrichment education teachers
    • Computer systems analysts
    Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 12. Fastest Declining Occupations 2000-2012
    • Telephone operators
    • Word processors and typists
    • Textile knitting and weaving machine setters, operators, and tenders
    • Sewing machine operators
    • Shuttle car operators
    • Textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine setters, operators, and tenders
    • Radio mechanics
    • Textile bleaching and dyeing machine operators and tenders
    • Roof bolters, mining
    • Fishers and related fishing workers
    • Shoe machine operators and tenders
    • All other communications equipment operators
    • Fabric and apparel patternmakers
    • Railroad brake, signal, and switch operators
    • Textile cutting machine setters, operators, and tenders
    • Sewers, hand
    • Farmers and ranchers
    • Continuous mining machine operators
    • Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers
    • Bridge and lock tenders
    • Computer operators
    • Shoe and leather workers and repairers
    • Brokerage clerks
    • Loan interviewers and clerks
    • Meter readers, utilities
    Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • 13. Minnesota Outlook
  • 14. Minnesota Is Bigger, Older And Better Educated: 1960-2000
    • 3.4 million
    • 28.5
    • 37.6%
    • 1.2%
    • 7.5%
    • 4.9 million
    • 35.4
    • 26.2%
    • 11.8%
    • 27.4%
    • Source: University of Minnesota
    1960 2000 Population Median Age Under age 18 Percent minority 4+ years of college
  • 15.
    • Educational Attainment
    • Migration Patterns
    • Diversity & Education
    • Population Distribution
    • Earnings by Educational Attainment
    • Aging of the Baby Boomers
    Minnesota Themes Tom Gillaspy, State Demographer
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  • 23. Nearly 3/5ths of the State’s labor force lives in the 7-county Twin Cities Region Source: LAUS, DEED-LMI
  • 24.  
  • 25. Tom Gillaspy, State Demographer
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  • 31. Occupational Trends in Minnesota
    • Over 70 percent of Minnesotans work in service-producing industries
    • Service and retail trade industries are projected to add the most jobs in Minnesota between 2000 and 2010
    • Sales, information technology, office and health occupations are projected to add the most jobs.
    • While short-term OJT jobs are booming, jobs requiring Bachelor’s or Associate’s degree are the fastest growing.
  • 32. How is MnSCU responding to the need to be more responsive to workforce needs?
  • 33. Models and Tools for Aligning Workforce Needs and Higher Education
    • Visits with Business and Industry
    • Competitive grants for curricular development in high need areas
    • Matched Leveraged equipment grants (previous funding cycle)
    • Federal agenda to secure additional outside funding
    • Coordination with key industries such as Allied Health
    • Models to target highest need areas
      • MnSCU- College and University Planning Profile System
      • DEED- High need clusters
      • Minnesota High Tech Association study
  • 34. Business and Industry Visits
    • Changing Workplace
    • Image and Public Perception
    • Community Vitality
    • System Efficiencies
    • Relationship with Secondary Education
  • 35. Business and Industry: What is Working
    • Business and industry partnerships
    • Customized training; nimbleness and responsiveness
    • Services to dislocated workers
    • Customer service
    • Provision of positive learning environments and education for students
    • Businesses like to hire our graduates after internships and mentoring experiences
  • 36. Themes
    • Employers need training for incumbent workers , new workers at speed as soon as possible.
      • Increases in supervisory management
      • Soft skill management and leadership training
      • Industry safety
      • Health
      • Computer training
    • Downturns and upswings impact students’ perceptions of a field
    • Increasing the customizing of training delivery
  • 37. MnSCU Assessment: CUPPS Statewide Current Shortage Clusters $16.64 -9,584 259,666 Business and Financial Services $14.16 -1,256 20,894 Mechanics $19.20 -3,507 34,581 Information Technology $16.08 -1,296 52,805 Education $17.65 -7,203 102,260 Health Entry Hourly Wage Shortage Employment Cluster
  • 38. Department of Employment and Economic Development Key Industries, Key Occupations, Key Skills in the Twin Cities
    • Health care
    • Finance and insurance
    • Professional and technical
    • Transportation
    • High tech manufacturing
  • 39. Next Steps Transform Higher Education
    • Strengthen the quality of early education
    • Keep quality high
    • Deal with high levels of remediation
    • Provide good information about job market and education required
    • Deal with the mismatch between higher education and the economy
      • Monitor and respond to labor market demands
      • Create array of options for life long learning
  • 40. Vision for the Future 5-year Market Responsive Goals
    • Trainers of choice for local businesses
    • Business involvement in strategic plans-specific job needs
    • Career-ladder degrees
    • Blur lines between credit and noncredit courses
    • Flexible training and delivery systems
    • One-stop centers
    • Collaboration between colleges
    • Creation of bridge programs K-16 for seamless service
    • Center of excellence
    • Develop set of economic goals and objectives by the community
    • Workforce investment boards develop regional economic centers at colleges
    • Small businesses create contracts with colleges
    • Return on investment from market responsive colleges is equal to regional development
    21 st Century Community College September 2004
  • 41. What is the vision for MnSCU in relation to market responsiveness?