Ctfl Seta Careers Guide
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Ctfl Seta Careers Guide

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Ctfl Seta Careers Guide Ctfl Seta Careers Guide Presentation Transcript

  • CTFL SETA Careers Guide
  • Purpose of the Guide
    • Promote awareness of careers in the CTFL sector
    • Provide insight into critical and scarce skills in the sector
    • School leavers / career councilors
    • Unemployed people
    • Learners
    • Employees and employers
    • Shop stewards
    • Government
    • Providers
    • Skills development facilitators
    Who is it for?
  • The CTFL Sector
    • Manufacture of textiles:
    • Manufacture of clothing:
    The CTFL Sector
    • Manufacture of leather:
    The CTFL Sector
    • Manufacture of footwear:
    The CTFL Sector
    • Manufacture of leather products:
    The CTFL Sector
    • Fashion Design
    • Clothing and footwear product design
    • Textile design
    The CTFL Sector
    • Incorporates
    • Design
    • Pattern making
    • Sewing
  • Careers in the CTFL sector Product Development Manufacturing Marketing & Sales Distribution Education, Training and Development Generic Management & Support Staff Information Technology Technical Production Technologists Design and Research Quality
  • Learning Opportunities in the CTFL sector
    • Training Providers
      • FET (colleges and workplace providers) – national certificates, short courses and learnerships
      • HET (universities, universities of technology and professional institutes) – national certificates, diplomas or degrees.
  • Scarce Skills
    • Insufficient number of qualified and experienced people in specific occupations
      • Technological skills
      • Technician and technical skills
      • Production management skills
      • Business/entrepreneurial skills
      • Machine repair and maintenance skills
  • CTFL Qualifications
    • Durban University of Technology
      • National Certificate: Clothing Management
      • National Diploma Clothing Management
      • B Tech: Clothing Management
      • National Diploma: Textile Technology (dry or wet processing options)
    • University of Johannesburg
      • National Diploma: Fashion
      • B Tech: Fashion
      • M Tech: Fashion
      • National Diploma: Clothing Management
      • B Tech: Clothing Management
    • Cape Peninsula University of Technology
      • National Certificate: Clothing Management
      • National Diploma: Clothing Management
      • B Tech: Clothing Management
      • National Diploma: Textile Technology
      • B Tech: Textile Technology
    CTFL Qualifications
    • UNISA
      • B Consumer Science: Clothing Management
      • B Consumer Science
    • International School of Tanning Technology (ISTT)
      • Basic level: Tanning, Dyehouse & Leather Finishing
      • Intermediate level: Tanning, Dyehouse & Leather Finishing
      • National Higher Certificate in Leather Technology
    CTFL Qualifications
    • Walter Sisulu University
      • Fashion
    • University of Stellenbosch
      • BSC: Textile and Polymer Science
    • Sewing Industry Technical Training
      • Join component parts – Sewing Level 2
    CTFL Qualifications
  • Critical Skills in the CTFL sector
    • Skills gaps within CTFL organisations
      • Deficiencies of specific knowledge, experience or competencies
        • Influence level of effectiveness
        • Hinder business growth
      • Addressed through interventions and short courses (not necessarily accredited)
        • Strategic management, leadership skills, industrial relations, financial management, train-the-trainer, supervisory development etc.
  • Learnerships in the CTFL sector
    • Work-based route to a qualification (theoretical learning and work-based experience)
    • Learnerships –
      • Fast track the development of current employees
      • Opportunity to acquire recognised qualifications
      • Entry point for young people into the industry
      • Professionalise the sector
  • Learnerships in the CTFL sector
    • Who is involved?
      • The learner
      • The training provider
      • The employer
  • The Benefits of Learnerships
    • For the learners:
      • Obtain qualification while earning some income
      • Recognition and formalisation of experience and knowledge
      • Route to employment or self-employment
      • Practical, on-the-job learning
  • The Benefits of Learnerships
    • For the employers:
      • Provide learners with relevant work experience
      • Way of acknowledging and affirming skills of existing employees.
  • How to get involved in a learnership?
    • Entry requirements
      • At least ABET level 4 (English & Maths)
      • Matric (Grade 12) would be an advantage
    • Recruitment
      • Employers recruit from within (employed people) or from outside (unemployed) through advertisements
      • Registration on the DoL Workseeker database
  • CTFL Learnership Environment
    • Theoretical & practical training
    • Industrial operations – same working conditions apply
    • High technical nature – require high skills levels
    • Shift work may be required