• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Consumer Health
 

Consumer Health

on

  • 691 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
691
Views on SlideShare
691
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Consumer Health Consumer Health Presentation Transcript

  • Consumer Health Advertising and Marketing Chpt 4 Adapted from Jim Grizzell @ CSU Pomona
  • Advertising & Marketing
    • Advertising
      • The activity of attracting public attention to a product or business, as by paid announcements in the print, broadcast, or electronic media
    • Marketing
      • To offer for sale
      • To sell
  • Advertising
    • Placement of announcements and persuasive messages in time or space
    • Purchased in any of the mass media by business firms, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and individuals who
    • Seek to inform and / or persuade members of a particular target market or audience about their products, services, organizations, or ideas
  • Marketing
    • The process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives
  • Marketing Ethics
    • American Marketing Association Code of Ethics http://www.marketingpower.com/live/content435.php
  • AMA Code of Ethics
    • Participants in the marketing exchange process should be able to expect that:
      • Products and services offered are safe and fit for their intended uses
      • Communications about offered products and services are not deceptive
  • AMA Code of Ethics
    • Avoidance of false and misleading advertising
    • Rejection of high-pressure manipulations, or misleading sales tactics
    • Avoidance of sales promotions that use deception or manipulation
  • Advertising Techniques
    • Words, phrases
      • Puffery
      • Weasel words & phrases
      • Half-truths
      • Power words
    • AMA Code
      • “ Do not use puffery statements or hype (i.e. we make the best widgets East of the Rockies), but do inform the reader of your status in your industry”
  • What to Look For
    • Unambiguous clinical outcome
      • When compared with DRUG X, DRUG Y delivers faster symptom relief.
    • Vague clinical outcome
      • DRUG X is the new, effective 20 μg pill with a low incidence of discontinuation due to skin problems.
    • Emotive or immeasurable outcome
      • DRUG X – one of a kind or DRUG X – a source of healing power.
    • Non-clinical outcome (eg, drug plasma half-lives or biochemical markers)
      • Using DRUG X resulted in a 30% increase in arterial luminal diameter in post-mortem dissections.
  • Marketing by . . .
    • Medical Professionals
    • Hospitals
    • Prescription drug companies
      • Direct to consumer advertising
    • Non-prescription drug companies
  • Marketing Other Products
    • Food
    • Dietary supplements
    • Tobacco
    • Weight loss
    • Youth and beauty
    • Exercise and fitness
  • Food Advertising
    • Promotes dietary imbalance
      • High fat, high sugar, low nutrients, snacks
    • Goal of children’s shows to sell products
      • Toys, video games, cereal, other shows
    • Health benefits of specific foods
      • Low in sugar but high in fat
      • No talk of overall diet
  • Dietary Supplements
    • Most ads misleading
      • Claim we can’t meet nutritional needs
      • Claim products can prevent or treat disease
      • Unwarranted claims protected by free speech
    • 1994 Dietary Supplement Act
      • http:// vm . cfsan . fda . gov /~ dms / supplmnt .html
  • DSHEA1994 Act
      • FDA regulates dietary supplements under a different set of regulations than those covering "conventional" foods and drug products (prescription and Over-the-Counter).
      • Under (DSHEA), the dietary supplement manufacturer is responsible for ensuring that a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed.
      • FDA is responsible for taking action against any unsafe dietary supplement product after it reaches the market.
      • Generally, manufacturers do not need to register with FDA nor get FDA approval before producing or selling dietary supplements. Manufacturers must make sure that product label information is truthful and not misleading.
  • FDA Post market
      • FDA's post-marketing responsibilities include monitoring safety
        • Voluntary dietary supplement adverse event reporting
        • Product information
          • Labeling
          • Claims
          • Package inserts
          • Accompanying literature
  • Patent Pending or Patented
    • Means nothing
      • Patent office does not require a patent to work
      • Patent office only requires that this product is different from some other product, formulation, mechanism
  • Federal Trade Commission
    • Dietary Supplements:An Advertising Guide for the Industry
    • http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/buspubs/dietsupp. htm
      • Identifying Express and Implied Claims
      • When to Disclose Qualifying Information
      • Clear and Prominent Disclosure
    • Diet & Fitness Consumer Tips http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/menu-health. htm
    • To file a complaint https://rn.ftc.gov/pls/dod/wsolcq$.startup?Z_ORG_CODE=PU01
  • Cigarette Advertising
    • Master Settlement in 1998
      • Advertising dollars continue to rise
        • http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2003/06/2001cigrpt. htm
  • Consumer Tips for Prescription Drugs
    • Primary purpose of ad is to sell you a product
    • Do not assume ad gives you full story
    • Get more information
      • Toll-free number
      • Reference book
      • Your physician
  • Consumer Tips for Non-Prescription Drugs
    • Ignore hype: secret, special, foreign formulas, testimonials, miracle or wonder cure
    • Get more information
    • Select products by ingredients listed
      • Not claims
    • Choose single-ingredient products
  • Marketing Schemes
    • Multi-Level Marketing
      • Amway, Mary Kay, Nu Skin, Juice Plus, Sunrider
      • $35 - $100 Kit
      • Likely all make false/deceptive claims
    • Telemarketing
  • Regulation
    • Industry Self-Regulation
      • National Advertising Review Board
        • “ Truth and accuracy in national advertising"
        • Recommendations are non-binding, most advertisers accept the NARB Panel's findings.
        • Can refer to law enforcement
  • Government Regulation
    • Government
      • FDA-food, supplements, drugs, devices
      • FTC- jurisdiction over products & services no drugs
      • USPS-products marketed via mail
      • Various state & local agencies - power & jurisdiction vary
  • Summary
    • Marketing codes of ethics
    • Marketing techniques
    • Consumer Tips