Community And Economic Development, Engagement, And The Land Grant Ideal

641 views
567 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
641
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Community And Economic Development, Engagement, And The Land Grant Ideal

    1. 1. Community and Economic Development, Engagement, and the Land-grant Ideal Ted Alter Associate Vice President for Outreach and Director of Cooperative Extension Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce. Marilyn Corbin Assistant Director of Cooperative Extension and State Program Leader National Community Resources and Economic Development Conference February 24-27, 2002 Orlando, FL
    2. 2. <ul><li>CRED work can play a front-line role in the engagement movement and in the achieving the land-grant ideal. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Community Development Principles of Good Practice <ul><li>Promote active and representative participation toward enabling all community members to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Engage community members in learning about and understanding community issues, and the economic, social, environmental, political, psychological, and other impacts associated with alternative courses of action. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Community Development Principles of Good Practice <ul><li>Incorporate the diverse interests and cultures of the community in the community developments process; and disengage from support of any effort that is likely to adversely affect the disadvantaged members of a community. </li></ul><ul><li>Work actively to enhance the leadership capacity of community members, leaders, and groups within the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Be open to using the full range of action strategies to work toward the long-term sustainability and well being of the community. </li></ul>
    5. 5. The Land-Grant Ideal <ul><li>The development of a higher education for the common people devoted to a marriage of “liberal and practical” concerns, where civic principles and cultural values provide measures or standards for the development of technical or vocational proficiencies and competencies. </li></ul>
    6. 6. The Engaged Institution <ul><li>Responsive to the needs of today’s students and communities and is planning for tomorrow’s, not yesterday’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Puts knowledge and expertise to work on problems communities face. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Characteristics of an Engaged Institution <ul><li>Responsiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for partners </li></ul><ul><li>Academic neutrality </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility </li></ul><ul><li>Integration </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination </li></ul><ul><li>Resource partnerships </li></ul>
    8. 8. The Engaged Institution <ul><li>Builds human capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Enriches the teaching/learning process </li></ul><ul><li>Opens new lines of research inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Prepares society-ready graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthens community capacity </li></ul>
    9. 9. The Engaged Institution <ul><li>The purpose of engagement is not to provide the university’s superior expertise to the community, but to encourage joint academic-community definitions of problems, solutions, and success. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Public Scholarship <ul><li>Celebrates and develops ordinary people as civic, economic and cultural producers </li></ul><ul><li>Honors both scientific knowledge and knowledge from practical experience, transforming each through public research and action partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Seeks wisdom, not just knowledge or economic and technical efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Promote civic engagement </li></ul>
    11. 11. The Practice of Public Scholarship Examining the weak and vague understanding of the meaning and practical implications of the land-grant idea or mission itself, and the erosion of a disciplinary and institutional ethos that grounds and guides faculty in understanding and then living out the civil dimensions of the land-grant mission.
    12. 12. The Practice of Public Scholarship <ul><li>Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Methods </li></ul>
    13. 13. Examples of Community Development/Engagement <ul><li>Economic Opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Community Development </li></ul><ul><li>Community Based Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Local Capacity Building </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Development </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>CRED has been committed to and delivered on the principles for engagement, leading the way for Cooperative Extension and all of higher education. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Community Development Principles of Good Practice <ul><li>Promote active and representative participation toward enabling all community members to meaningfully influence the decisions that affect their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Engage community members in learning about and understanding community issues, and the economic, social, environmental, political, psychological, and other impacts associated with alternative courses of action. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Community Development Principles of Good Practice <ul><li>Incorporate the diverse interests and cultures of the community in the community developments process; and disengage from support of any effort that is likely to adversely affect the disadvantaged members of a community. </li></ul><ul><li>Work actively to enhance the leadership capacity of community members, leaders, and groups within the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Be open to using the full range of action strategies to work toward the long-term sustainability and well being of the community. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Challenge to CRED <ul><li>How can other learn from our practice and experience? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we take leadership? </li></ul>
    18. 18. Community and Economic Development, Engagement, and the Land-grant Ideal Ted Alter Associate Vice President for Outreach and Director of Cooperative Extension Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce. Marilyn Corbin Assistant Director of Cooperative Extension and State Program Leader National Community Resources and Economic Development Conference February 24-27, 2002 Orlando, FL
    19. 19. Community and Economic Development, Engagement, and the Land-grant Ideal COOPERATIVE EXTENSION Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences Marilyn Corbin Assistant Director of Cooperative Extension and State Program Leader Ted Alter Associate Vice President for Outreach and Director of Cooperative Extension Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.

    ×