Bill Dixon Innovation Day

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  • 1. USING ELECTRONIC VOTING SYSTEMS IN LARGE GROUP TEACHING Bill Dixon School of Criminology, Education, Sociology & Social Work Teaching Innovation Day 2006-7 29 May 2007
  • 2. WHAT’S THE USE OF LECTURES?
    • Donald Bligh (1998: 6-9)
      • Acquisition of information
        • A framework for private study
      • Promotion of thought
        • Awakening critical thinking
      • Changes in attitude
        • Acquisition of ‘discipline’ values
        • Inspiring interest and enthusiasm
      • Development of behavioural skills
  • 3. MAKING LECTURES USEFUL
    • Bligh (1998: 224-7)
      • Providing feedback
        • Student – student and student - lecturer
      • Allowing time for ‘rehearsal’
        • Reviewing and restructuring information
      • Avoiding interference and negative transfer
        • The dangers of information overload
      • Encouraging active learning
        • Problem-solving and discussion
      • Maintaining high levels of attention
  • 4. USING EVS FOR INTERACTIVE LECTURES
    • Draper (2005)
      • EVS and MCQs to promote interaction in lectures
        • Testing understanding
          • Prospective adaptation
          • Retrospective (self) assessment
        • Initiating small group discussion
        • Providing feedback to lecturer on teaching
  • 5. BACKGROUND
    • CRI-10001 Introduction to Criminology
      • 2005-6
        • New module leader and (sole) lecturer
        • New textbook
          • Criminology: A Sociological Introduction
        • Increased contact time
          • 22 rather than 11 lectures (plus 5 tutorials)
        • Revised assessment
          • Diagnostic test
          • 1,500 word course work assignment (50% marks)
          • 1 hour/50 question MC examination (50% marks)
  • 6. LEARNING OUTCOMES
    • Knowledge and understanding
      • Criminology as a discipline
      • Criminological data and research
      • A criminological understanding of crime and criminal justice
    • Study skills
      • Studying criminology
        • Thinking, talking and writing criminologically
  • 7. CONTEXT
    • Module revisions
      • Course work assignment
        • Practical exercise and auto-critique
        • Negative marking of MC exam
      • VLE
        • Online resources
        • Asynchronous discussions
    • Numbers
      • 200+ registered students
        • 120 – 50 present
    • Accommodation and equipment
      • Westminster
      • 64 handsets and a laptop
  • 8. GETTING STARTED
    • Introduction
      • What is an EVS?
      • Why use an EVS?
    • Practicalities
      • Distribution and collection
    • Dying on the first day
      • Power cut
      • The wrong USB port
      • Things can only get better …
  • 9. ELECTRONIC VOTING
    • What is an EVS?
      • Ask the audience on ‘Who wants to be a millionaire’
    • Why use an EVS?
      • Make lectures more interactive
        • Encourage discussion in small groups
        • Formative assessment and feedback
        • Identify ‘wicked issues’ for clarification and revision
        • Become familiar with multiple choice question (MCQ) format
  • 10. MUSIC
    • Which of the following kinds of music do you like best?
        • Hip-hop
        • Dance
        • Rock
        • Classical
  • 11. REVISION QUESTION
    • Which of the following views is NOT characteristic of the classical tradition in criminology?
      • As rational beings people will choose not to offend if the punishment fits the crime 17%
      • Punishment should be public, prompt and parsimonious 19%
      • Criminals are driven to offend by social, psychological and other forces beyond their control 44%
      • Penal laws should seek to provide for the greatest good of the greatest number 19%
  • 12. EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK
    • In response to the following questions, please respond as follows:
      • Strongly disagree
      • Disagree
      • Neither disagree nor agree
      • Agree
      • Strongly agree
  • 13. STATEMENTS
    • Carrabine et al’ s Criminology: A Sociological Introduction is a good introductory text 81% agree
    • Lectures are useful 86% agree
    • I have used the VLE (WebCT) 86% agree
    • Electronic voting makes lectures more interesting 78% agree
    • This module is too difficult 55% disagree
  • 14. HATE CRIMES
    • Which of the following incidents involves a ‘hate crime’?
      • A young white man is called a ‘redneck’ by a group of young Asian men
      • A man assaults his girl friend for being a ‘dirty slag’ and coming home drunk
      • A member of staff at the check-in desk pushes past a disabled passenger protesting about a budget airline’s failure to provide wheelchairs free of charge saying that she should get out of the way of ‘normal people’
      • A group of Muslims demonstrate outside a Catholic church calling for the Pope to be executed
      • A man sprays ‘Fuck u batty boys’ on the door of a gay bar
  • 15. BURGLARS
    • According to recent Home Office Research (Hearnden and Magill, 2004) what was the main reason given by burglars for committing their first offence?
      • Boredom 20%
      • Funding drug use 11%
      • Saw an easy target 34%
      • Influence of friends 25%
  • 16. UNDERSTANDING BURGLARS
    • Which of the following theories appears to be supported by Hearnden and Magill’s (2004) research on why burglars committed their first offence?
      • Classicism and rational choice theory 9%
      • Mertonian strain theory 31%
      • Sutherland’s theory of differential association 30%
      • Sykes and Matza’s theory of neutralisation 11%
      • Labelling theory 6%
  • 17. EVALUATION
    • Methods
      • Self-completion questionnaire
      • Administered in (compulsory) tutorials in Week 11
    • Questions
      • Attendance
        • Number of classes
      • Positive and/or negative contribution to learning
        • Maximum of three each in rank order of importance
      • Overall rating
        • 10 point scale from 1 (negative) to 10 (positive)
      • Recommendation
        • Future use of EVS
    • Response rate 62.5% (n = 125)
  • 18. ATTENDANCE 24 30 All (10/11) 51.2 64 6-9 19.2 24 2-5 2.4 3 1-2 1.6 2 0 Percentage Students No. of classes
  • 19. FEATURES 11.2 14 No response 44.8 56 Negative ( ≥ 1 mentioned) 90.4 113 Positive ( ≥ 1 mentioned) Percentage Students
  • 20. OVERALL RATING 10.4 13 10 28.8 36 9 28.0 35 8 16.0 20 7 7.2 9 6 3.2 4 5 2.4 3 4 1.6 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 Percentage Students Rating
  • 21. RECOMMENDATION 4.1 5 Don’t know 3.3 4 Don’t use EVS again 92.5 111 Use EVS again Percentage Students Recommendation
  • 22. POSITIVES 29 Interest 43 Discussion 47 Knowledge 69 Concentration 97 Assessment Mentions
  • 23. NEGATIVES 9 Questions 9 Pointless 15 Technical 26 Distraction 30 Overuse Mention
  • 24. OTHER MEASURES
    • Attendance
      • 9.00 – 11.00 Thursday morning
      • Rarely above 50%
      • Struggling to make 25% in later weeks
      • Lower than for comparable Year 1 module and previous year’s CRI-10001
    • Performance
      • Assessments changed
      • Unprecedented failure rate in MC exam
        • Effect of negative marking?
  • 25. CONCLUSIONS
    • What is the use of EVS?
      • Popular with students
      • Provides opportunities for ‘arousal’, feedback, ‘rehearsal’ and active learning
      • Reduces interference and negative transfer
      • May promote achievement of some learning outcomes
  • 26. REFERENCES
    • Bligh, D. (1998) What’s the Use of Lectures? 5 th edition. Exeter: Intellect.
    • Carrabine, E., Iganski, P., Lee, M., Plummer, K., and South, N. (2004) Criminology: A Sociological Introduction . London: Routledge.
    • Draper, S. (2005) Using EVS for Interactive Lectures. [Online document available at http:// www.psy.gla.ac.uk/~steve/ilig/handsetintro.html (accessed 27 May 2007)]
    • Hearnden, I. and Magill, C. (2004) Decision-making by house burglars: offenders’ perspectives , Research findings 204. London: Home Office. [Available at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs04/r249.pdf (accessed 10 August 2006)]