Blended teaching and the   changing role of the     language tutor       Anna Comas-Quinn     Department of Languages     ...
• How does blended/online language  teaching differ from traditional language  teaching?• How does language teaching at th...
What‟s good about online teaching and learning?
…besides being able to do it in your pyjamas…
What‟s good about „online‟?• Access to a wider range of views• Access to a larger pool of potential  communication partner...
“The supposed benefits of onlineinteraction are just not obvious to manylearners” (Goodfellow, 2007:6).both teachers and l...
Pedagogical                                               understandingSkills pyramid (Hampel & Stickler, 2005:312)
Is blogging a good thing for languagelearning….    if it‟s not compulsory?    if not many students write on their    blog?...
• Dörnyei‟s L2 Motivational Self System  (Dörnyei, 2009): Ideal Self, Ought-To Self  and Feared Self. „understanding how e...
• effective training must both destabilise teachers‟  existing views of their role and identity and  support them in build...
“I am not convinced about the pedagogic valueof blogs and revision exercises that are notproperly marked”„the face to face...
• teachers‟ willingness to change is  powerfully influenced by learners‟  expectations.• the fear that „by adopting a new ...
• teacher self and teacher identity > the core  of teacher training• easier for those who already aspire to  become online...
•   Comas-Quinn, Anna (2011). Learning to teach online or learning to become an online    teacher: an exploration of teach...
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Blended teaching and the changing role of the language teacher

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A presentation on what online teaching involves for teachers in terms of reconsidering their role and how effective training should help teachers do this rather than being limited to skills (learning to use the technology).

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Blended teaching and the changing role of the language teacher

  1. 1. Blended teaching and the changing role of the language tutor Anna Comas-Quinn Department of Languages 4 May 2012
  2. 2. • How does blended/online language teaching differ from traditional language teaching?• How does language teaching at the OU differ from language teaching elsewhere?
  3. 3. What‟s good about online teaching and learning?
  4. 4. …besides being able to do it in your pyjamas…
  5. 5. What‟s good about „online‟?• Access to a wider range of views• Access to a larger pool of potential communication partners• Time and location independent• Collaboration and community• …
  6. 6. “The supposed benefits of onlineinteraction are just not obvious to manylearners” (Goodfellow, 2007:6).both teachers and learners need to knownot only how to use new technologies butalso why they should use them(Kirkwood & Price, 2005).
  7. 7. Pedagogical understandingSkills pyramid (Hampel & Stickler, 2005:312)
  8. 8. Is blogging a good thing for languagelearning…. if it‟s not compulsory? if not many students write on their blog? if the teacher does not mark it?
  9. 9. • Dörnyei‟s L2 Motivational Self System (Dörnyei, 2009): Ideal Self, Ought-To Self and Feared Self. „understanding how experienced language teachers engage with a new learning and teaching domain, and the ways in which they create, contribute to or resist opportunities for workplace learning‟ (White & Ding, 2009:346).
  10. 10. • effective training must both destabilise teachers‟ existing views of their role and identity and support them in building new perspectives which match the training outcomes (Kubanyiova, 2009). Wenger (1998) calls this „learning as becoming‟.• the learning process entails an element of identity formation as the teacher engages with the process in order to become „a certain person or to avoid becoming a certain person‟ (Wenger, 1998:215).
  11. 11. “I am not convinced about the pedagogic valueof blogs and revision exercises that are notproperly marked”„the face to face mode is much better aslearning a language is a lot to do with socialinteraction and communication‟What are the assumptions andunderlying values?
  12. 12. • teachers‟ willingness to change is powerfully influenced by learners‟ expectations.• the fear that „by adopting a new approach to teaching they would fail to meet the students‟ expectations‟ (Kubanyiova, 2009:326) particularly in a strongly learner-centred institution.
  13. 13. • teacher self and teacher identity > the core of teacher training• easier for those who already aspire to become online teachers, but for those who do not see themselves as online teachers, the training has to persuade them of the value of online teaching and the desirability of becoming online teachers.
  14. 14. • Comas-Quinn, Anna (2011). Learning to teach online or learning to become an online teacher: an exploration of teachers experiences in a blended learning course. ReCALL, 23(03), pp. 218–232. at http://oro.open.ac.uk/32111/• Dörnyei, Z. (2009) „The L2 Motivational Self System‟, in Dörnyei, Z and Ushioda, E (eds) Motivation, Language Identity and the L2 Self, Bristol: Multilingual Matters.• Goodfellow (2007) Rethinking Educational Technologies in the Age of Social Media: from „tools for interaction‟ to „sites of practice‟ Keynote presentation for Echanger Pour Apprendre en Ligne (EPAL) conference, Universite Standhal, Grenoble, 9 June 2007. Available online at: http://w3.u-grenoble3.fr/epal/pdf/goodfellow.pdf (accessed 5 December 2007)• Hampel, R. and Stickler, U. (2005) „New skills for new classrooms: Training tutors to teach languages online‟, Computer Assisted Language Learning, 18 (4): 311-326.• Kirkwood, A. and Price, L. (2005) „Learners and learning in the twenty-first century: what do we know about students‟ attitudes towards and experiences of information and communication technologies that will help us design courses?‟, Studies in Higher Education, 30 (3): 257-274.• Kubanyiova, M. (2009) „Possible Selves in Language Teacher Development‟, in Dörnyei, Z and Ushioda, E (eds) Motivation, Language Identity and the L2 Self, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 314-332.• Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press• White, C. and Ding, A. (2009) „Identity and Self in E-Language Teaching‟, in Dörnyei, Z and Ushioda, E (eds) Motivation, Language Identity and the L2 Self, Bristol, Multilingual Matters, 333-349.

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