'Digitools for tangible 3D creativity'

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3D digital modelling and 3D printing: the case for using Anarkik3D's 3D haptic Cloud9 sketch/modelling software to assess these technologies for the non CAD user, the artist, applied artist, designer markers and all creative people.

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  • First. Newish tool : 3D printing Digital model ‘bacon-sliced. Layers physically built into 3D object different methods and materials
  • 3D printing is not new.... mainly for use in industry and by professional designers: for final prototyping. As expensive: high quality finish Developing rapidly: different methods and materials What is new is the democratisation of digital technologies
  • Example is Ponoko New Zealand: 2D design your own/construct it yourself using laser cutting: Low cost service, easy to use online service Aimed at designers and makers who have wherewithal to access this by providing digital data, i.e. From CAD
  • Ponoko have teamed up with Shopbot in the US and set up 100K Garages Hub: expands the original concept into a global market place, a community of workshops with digital fabrication tools to get your stuff cut, machined in a range of materials “ The idea, then, is to bring together those who need to get things made - be it innovators, designers, or just regular folks looking for new solutions or new stuff - with “Fabbers” who have the technology tools for production.” Difference? 100K fabbers are independant
  • Ponoko itself now has affiliates in San Fran, Milan, Berlin and now London. The more you look at it, the more it appears Ponoko is a global coordinating layer on top of the manufacturing base, a layer that funnels consumers to the right equipment in the right locations. 
  • On the 3D side Shapeways design your own / finish it yourself low cost service, easy to use to upload digital designs
  • This is my page on/at Shapeways
  • Sculpteo Same concept. And one of the largest and longest established Company for rapid prototyping, Materialise in Belgium (and Sheffield) has set up i.materialise. This serves mainly pro designers and industry providing very high quality service and software for testing models for flaws
  • To access these services and resources: Need digital data to participate. which mainly comes from CAD (Computer Aided Design) packages These two illustrations are also from SketchUp Presentation and I have aligned them up to show the proportion of professionals using costly CAD to users of free products such as sketchup and Blender. Next issue for democratising and therefore accessing any industrial process requiring digital date is USABILITY
  • To access these services and resources: Need digital data to participate. which mainly comes from CAD (Computer Aided Design) packages S0 m ost using these services are professional designers, techies and CADies as CAD is a required tool for work. CAD used to be very expensive: some still is, some not – encouraging enthusiasts BUT huge learning curve, complex interface, more functions and features scary territory for most
  • Hands up who uses SketchUp Are they right about position? - does depend on who your users are – how you define them and what you are comparing your 3D software with. Anyone using Rhino, 3D studio, Blender, FormZ, Maya, ProEngineer? Where do you rate them Free goes a long way towards democratising 3D digital creativity but usability is king
  • This is where virtual 3D touch comes in as a new tool for 3D interaction and creativity
  • Download design for 3D printing: easy/cheap if free exciting then possibly boring? Not a creative experience
  • Haptics means virtual touch 3D VT not screen touch Device provided force feedback felt through the grip touch has WOW factor More intuitive way of interacting in 3D virtual space Total fun to use Software : non complex interface Easy to learn and to use Easy to move and rotate world and objects Easy to manipulate, deform, scale, construct, subtract Export file format direct to 3D printing Affordable. Can be used by anyone
  • Bundle: 3D haptic software plus 3D printer kit: Affordable
  • Cognitive flow less disrupted by complex interface How will creative businesses harness 3D printing and haptics to drive exciting new business opportunities? Take advantage of low prices ‘ Quick & Dirty’ Content creation Fast iterations Explore multiple options fast prototyping/3D printing failure: ‘fast and early’
  • what is on the horizon? Sky the limit! 3D Printing in glass? Its here. Edible stuff? Nutella: yes, Its here. Sugar: yes (CandyFab6000 by Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories) Composite healthy food: concept stage for ‘Cornucopia Food Printer What about IP
  • These advantages are outweighed by the complexity of use and cognitive load imposed on the user through steep learning curves and by the WIMP interface.
  • Haptics as a market set for rapid growth Novint investing heavily in haptics $9m in March 2007 Novint’s Falcon haptic device (3DoF) priced $200 launched June 2007 in US initially Sensable’s OMNI (6DoF) priced £1800 Novint’s new Falcon haptic device aimed at games market and mass produced.
  • Aim of activities: discover scope and potential for creating new 3D design produce real tangible objects: fusing digital 3D sketching and rapid prototyping (RP) use activity to attract, inspire, engage new designer makers / young creatives with digital media illustrate how new virtual media and RP technology offers not only new tools but also new ways of thinking and working Objective is to generate: a selection of three dimensional digital sketch/models illustrating high level qualities and interesting characteristic rapid prototype small selection of three dimensional models Hypothesis for potential Research Project: does this more intuitive mode of working in a novel immersive environment provide the means for new ways of thinking? And how could this be measured?
  • 'Digitools for tangible 3D creativity'

    1. 1. <ul><li>Theme: ‘Digitools’ for tangible 3D creativity </li></ul><ul><li>Focus: specifically 3D </li></ul><ul><li>two new (?) tools: 3D printing and virtual 3D touch </li></ul><ul><li>democratisation of these tools </li></ul><ul><li>how will creative businesses harness them to drive exciting new business opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>what is on the horizon for 3D creativity </li></ul><ul><li>(not specifically in this order) </li></ul>Ann Marie Shillito Anarkik3D Ltd
    2. 2. <ul><li>1. First: 3D printing </li></ul>Digital model ‘bacon-sliced. Layers physically built into 3D object
    3. 3. Mature technologies: mainly used in industry, by professional designers: for final prototyping. Expensive: high quality finish Developing rapidly: different methods and materials <ul><li>Rapid prototyping </li></ul><ul><li>Layer manufacture </li></ul><ul><li>3D printing </li></ul>
    4. 4. Ponoko From New Zealand: 2D DYO/CIY using laser cutting: low cost service, easy to use DYO: design your own CIY: construct it yourself Starting democratisation
    5. 5. “ The idea, then, is to bring together those who need to get things made - be it innovators, designers, or just regular folks looking for new solutions or new stuff - with “Fabbers” who have the technology tools for production.”
    6. 6. Cutting <ul><li>Affiliates expanding concept, cutting shipping costs, still 2D </li></ul><ul><li>Some 100K Garages have 3D – machining and 3D printing </li></ul><ul><li>Ponoko appears to be global coordinating layer </li></ul><ul><li>on top of manufacturing base </li></ul><ul><li>layer that funnels consumers to the right equipment in the right locations.  </li></ul>
    7. 7. 3D: Shapeways in Holland for 3D DYO/FIY using 3D printing: low cost service, easy to use
    8. 8. Dead easy to upload designs. Fast feedback re. size/cost, materials. Order button. Own page. Gallery. Shop. ‘ Co-designing’. Competitions. Offers. Real democratisation of 3D printing tools, per se
    9. 9. Sculpteo in France. Also 3D printing, DYO/FIY, low cost service, easy to use
    10. 10. Illustration taken from Sketchup Presentation for i.materialise conference. Can be seen here http://vimeo.com/11322333 <ul><li>Need digital data to participate: </li></ul><ul><li>2D/3D CAD (Computer Aided Design) packages. </li></ul><ul><li>Price range: $10K to free </li></ul>Proportion of ‘pro’ users of costlyCAD to general users of free products:
    11. 11. Illustration taken from Sketchup Presentation for i.materialise conference. Can be seen here http://vimeo.com/11322333 <ul><li>Most CAD packages </li></ul>CAD: The rest of us are here with too few easy to use packages
    12. 12. This is where SketchUp programmers probably think their freebie package sits. Are they right? ? 2D mouse for 3D manipulation?
    13. 13. Virtual 3D Touch is exciting : motivation essential to persevere with ‘hard’ Anarkik3D’s sketch/ modelling package with virtual 3D touch? CLOUD9 ? ? SketchUp realistically? Rhino CAD
    14. 14. Download design for 3D printing: easy/cheap if free exciting then boring? Not a creative experience.
    15. 15. Virtual 3D Touch: haptic device - force feedback Virtual touch : WOW factor Exciting, fun Software : non complex interface Easy to learn and to use Easy to move and rotate world and objects Easy to manipulate, deform, scale, construct, subtract Export file format direct to 3D printing
    16. 16. Screen capture from a video showing how easy Cloud9 is for deforming using cursor to push and pull, feeling the very natural interaction with the surfaces of the objects (This is V1. V2 released June 2010).
    17. 17. Bundle: 3D haptic software plus 3D printer kit: Affordable
    18. 18. <ul><li>3D printing and haptics to drive exciting new business opportunities? </li></ul><ul><li>Example: for design, applied arts: </li></ul><ul><li>advantage of low prices </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Quick & Dirty’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Content creation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fast iterations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explore multiple options fast </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>prototyping/3D printing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>failure: ‘fast and early’ </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. What’s on the horizon? Sky the limit! 3D Printing in glass? It’s here. Edible stuff? Nutella: It’s here. Sugar: its here (CandyFab6000 by Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories) Composite healthy food: concept stage ‘Cornucopia Food Printer
    20. 20. <ul><li>Games </li></ul>Virtual 3D Touch: Training: medical, physical tasks, occupational therapy Navigating virtual worlds Architecture Exciting, fun Animation Learning: e.g. Math, physics principles And so much more You name it Playing, constructing Exploring 3D WOW factor
    21. 21. <ul><li>Fabbaloo: 04/07/2010 </li></ul><ul><li>After re-reading Bradshaw, Bowyer and Haufe's paper &quot;The Intellectual Property Implications of Low-Cost 3D Printing&quot; , we've been considering where this personal manufacturing space is heading. In the paper, the tangled intellectual property rights scenarios they described involved personal manufacturing of some sort. It occurred to us that at the end of the day, most manufactured consumer objects are used by a person, directly or indirectly. Why else would they exist? Consumer objects are ultimately for personal use. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>In the distant future when personal manufacturing capabilities become much more widespread due to more advanced capabilities and ease of use, people have the potential to become the manufacturers of the objects they use. But what does that imply? The ability to simply scan objects, make them yourself and be protected via &quot;personal use&quot; laws challenges current concepts of commercial manufacturing. The previously &quot;commercial&quot; objects found in stores would be replaced by &quot;personal use&quot; objects. Why would you be a manufacturer of consumer goods if the essence of your products could be quickly reproduced by everyone &quot;for personal use&quot;? Perhaps there will always be some aspects of manufacturing that won't appear in personal manufacturing stations (such as high-density electronics, unusual materials, etc.), but many objects don't involve those.  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Those manufacturers would have to change their approach, much like other industries have transformed over the past decade. The answer might be App Stores for objects: an easy-to-use, touch-a-button store for objects. But it won't be objects you'll buy. Instead you will receive the design, which you will use to manufacture the item yourself.  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>We can see the beginnings of this manufacturing concept in the business models of Ponoko and Shapeways, but the technology, designs and even knowledge of this capability are simply not there yet. In coming years when the pieces are &quot;ripe&quot;, a future Steve Jobs will put it together into a breakthrough system that everyone can use.  </li></ul>Some background:
    22. 22. <ul><li>Barrier to creativity in digital media: </li></ul><ul><li>Complex non-intuitive CAD interface </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WIMP (windows/icon/mouse/pointer) system running 3DStudio MAX </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Potential solution: </li></ul><ul><li>haptic (force-feedback) device with </li></ul><ul><li>6 degrees of freedom, combined with stereovision and co-located environment </li></ul><ul><li>(Reachin Interface) </li></ul>Tacitus Project: investigating haptic technology as a potentially more intuitive way of working on computer for Designers and Applied Artists Some Tacitus Research background:
    23. 23. <ul><li>Examples of problematic conventional computer interfaces and hardware for designing! </li></ul><ul><li>complicated, overcrowded, </li></ul><ul><li>non-intuitive, constraining </li></ul>2 DOF: Up/Down, Left/ Right ( 6 DOF: Roll, Pitch, Yaw, Up/Down, Left/Right, Forward/Back)
    24. 24. <ul><li>Examples of haptic ‘force feedback devices: Haptics refers to the modality of touch & associated sensory feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Right: CyberGrasp Glove, devices from ForceDimension & Novint ( Falcon ) </li></ul>Top row: devices from Sensable HapticMaster device haptic devices
    25. 25. Claude Heath : detail from ‘Acrobat’ three dimensional digital sketch <ul><li>Aim: discover scope and potential for creating new 3D designs and producing real tangible objects </li></ul><ul><li>fusing two technologies - digital 3 sketching and rapid prototyping </li></ul><ul><li>illustrate how new virtual media and RP technology offers not only new tools but also the prospect of entirely new ways of thinking and working </li></ul>Some background : Drawn Reality Project
    26. 26. DrawnReality:
    27. 27. <ul><li>DrawnReality Project: </li></ul><ul><li>3D printed objects by 4 designers – Hazel White, David Poston, Anne Finlay and Suzanne Esser </li></ul>
    28. 28. Bit about Ann Marie Shillito’s digital/fabbing background
    29. 29. Ann Marie Shillito: Rapid prototyping/3D printing

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