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Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
Pruning 101
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Pruning 101

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Tree pruning presentation designed for the general public.

Tree pruning presentation designed for the general public.

Published in: Self Improvement
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  • Between 60 and 70 degrees. Radial branch distribution should allow five to seven scaffolds to fill the circle of space around a trunk. prevents overshadowing, which in turn reduces competition for light and nutrients.
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2.  
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    • 7. Pruning 101 Ann Koenig Missouri Department of Conservation
    • 8. General Tree Biology <ul><li>Trees grow from branch tips, not base. </li></ul>
    • 9. General Tree Biology <ul><li>Trees grow from branch tips, not base. </li></ul><ul><li>Branch unions can form callus tissue. </li></ul>
    • 10. General Tree Biology <ul><li>Trees grow from branch tips, not base. </li></ul><ul><li>Branch unions can form callus tissue. </li></ul><ul><li>Wounds cover, not heal. </li></ul>
    • 11. General Tree Biology <ul><li>A tree can only </li></ul><ul><li>“ seal” </li></ul><ul><li>itself through </li></ul><ul><li>a process called </li></ul><ul><li>compartmentalization. </li></ul>
    • 12.  
    • 13. General Tree Biology <ul><li>Trees grow from branch tips, not base. </li></ul><ul><li>Branch unions can form callus tissue. </li></ul><ul><li>Wounds cover, not heal. </li></ul><ul><li>Right tree in the right place may need little to no pruning once established. </li></ul>
    • 14.  
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    • 19. Pruning New Trees <ul><li>Do not remove more than 20% of branches at this time. </li></ul><ul><li>Remove broken, crossing or rubbing branches. </li></ul>
    • 20. Pruning Young Trees <ul><li>One or two years after planting, start selecting scaffold branches that have good vertical and horizontal spacing. </li></ul>
    • 21. Pruning Young Trees <ul><li>Wide angles </li></ul><ul><li>vertical spacing </li></ul><ul><li>Radial branch distribution </li></ul>
    • 22. Pruning Young Trees <ul><li>Remove branches when young so wounds are small and growth goes into future limbs. Remove: </li></ul><ul><li>Dead, dying limbs </li></ul><ul><li>Sprouts near base </li></ul><ul><li>Crossed branches, branches going through </li></ul><ul><li>center </li></ul><ul><li>Low branches </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Narrow unions with included bark </li></ul>
    • 23. Inside View of Included Bark <ul><li>Included bark is shown by the pencil. </li></ul><ul><li>Branches with included bark should be removed while the tree is young. </li></ul>
    • 24. Narrow unions
    • 25. Included bark between the branch/trunk union.  Note the seam or &quot;crack&quot; between the two. 
    • 26. Cut open view showing lack of connective tissue at the top of the branch union.
    • 27.  
    • 28. Pruning Tools <ul><li>Pruning tools are either pruner or saw based </li></ul>
    • 29. Pruners
    • 30. When to Prune <ul><li>Generally in dormant season </li></ul><ul><li>Birch and Maple may “bleed” but not harmful. Avoid by pruning in early winter or late spring. </li></ul><ul><li>Spring flowering trees, prune right after flower. </li></ul>
    • 31. Where to make the cut
    • 32.  
    • 33.  
    • 34. Large limb removal <ul><li>The 3 cut method </li></ul>
    • 35. The undercut did its job!
    • 36. <ul><li>Not under cut used. Leaves large pruning wound. </li></ul>
    • 37. Rule of Thirds <ul><li>When pruning a branch, try to bring it back to a limb at least 1/3 the diameter of the limb being removed. </li></ul>
    • 38.  
    • 39.  
    • 40. Top 10 Worst Pruning Practices <ul><li>Neglecting a young tree </li></ul><ul><li>Dressing wounds </li></ul><ul><li>Filling cavities </li></ul><ul><li>Flush cutting </li></ul><ul><li>Leaving stubs </li></ul><ul><li>Ignoring included bark </li></ul><ul><li>Using wrong tools </li></ul><ul><li>for the job </li></ul><ul><li>Over pruning </li></ul><ul><li>Not being safe </li></ul>
    • 41. #1 Worst Pruning Practice Topping!!!
    • 42.  
    • 43. Why not top trees? <ul><li>Injures tree leading to decay </li></ul><ul><li>Resulting shoots are weakly attached and easily break </li></ul><ul><li>Wastes money </li></ul><ul><li>Creates hazard </li></ul>
    • 44.  
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    • 46.  
    • 47.  
    • 48. Test Time
    • 49.  
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    • 57.  
    • 58. Ann Koenig Urban Forester Missouri Department of Conservation 1907 Hillcrest Drive Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 884-6861 [email_address]

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