Michigan Energy Forum: Public Policy<br />September 8, 2011<br />
Coal Challenges<br /><ul><li>More than 150 plant cancellations in the last three years
No new groundbreakings last 2 years
Escalating capital costs
Escalating operating costs
Increased regulations</li></li></ul><li>Loss of investor confidence<br />“Increases in policy and regulation to reduce car...
Carbon capture and sequestration<br /><ul><li>Parasitic load - 25-30 percent
Increases emissions from fuel extraction, processing and transportation
Infrastructure demand</li></ul>20 Gt CO2 from stationary sources<br />Requires 5-10 times the throughput of all transporta...
Effect of air toxics rule<br />Economic Policy Institute<br /><ul><li>The Air Toxics Rule would have a modest positive net...
The Rule would create between 81,000 and 101,000 jobs in the pollution abatement and control industry.
Between 31,000 and 46,000 jobs would be lost due to higher energy prices leading to reductions in output.
Assuming a re-spending multiplier of 0.5, and since the net impact of the above impacts is positive, another 9,000 to 53,0...
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September 2011 - Michigan Energy Forum - Stanley "Skip" Pruss

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Regulatory Drivers For CleanTech and Green Jobs: When people think of CleanTech, they usually think of wind turbines and solar panels, but there may be a burgeoning opportunity in energy efficiency. Many states, including Michigan, have adopted Renewable Portfolio Standards that requires utilities to generate a portion of their electricity from renewable sources. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently promulgated a regulation (the GHG BACT) that will require utilities to reduce their carbon emissions, primarily through energy efficiency. However, several members of Congress are trying to cut back on GHG regulations arguing that these regulations are job killers. Come to the Michigan Energy Forum on September 8th to learn about the latest regulatory developments, what they have meant from green jobs in Michigan, and what the future might hold.

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September 2011 - Michigan Energy Forum - Stanley "Skip" Pruss

  1. 1. Michigan Energy Forum: Public Policy<br />September 8, 2011<br />
  2. 2. Coal Challenges<br /><ul><li>More than 150 plant cancellations in the last three years
  3. 3. No new groundbreakings last 2 years
  4. 4. Escalating capital costs
  5. 5. Escalating operating costs
  6. 6. Increased regulations</li></li></ul><li>Loss of investor confidence<br />“Increases in policy and regulation to reduce carbon emissions are inevitable and will impact the viability of current investments and operations” <br />Lloyd’s of London<br />“Coal is a ‘dead man walking’” <br /> Deutsche Bank<br />
  7. 7. Carbon capture and sequestration<br /><ul><li>Parasitic load - 25-30 percent
  8. 8. Increases emissions from fuel extraction, processing and transportation
  9. 9. Infrastructure demand</li></ul>20 Gt CO2 from stationary sources<br />Requires 5-10 times the throughput of all transportation fuels<br />
  10. 10. Effect of air toxics rule<br />Economic Policy Institute<br /><ul><li>The Air Toxics Rule would have a modest positive net impact on overall employment, likely leading to the creation of 28,000 to 158,000 jobs between now and 2015.
  11. 11. The Rule would create between 81,000 and 101,000 jobs in the pollution abatement and control industry.
  12. 12. Between 31,000 and 46,000 jobs would be lost due to higher energy prices leading to reductions in output.
  13. 13. Assuming a re-spending multiplier of 0.5, and since the net impact of the above impacts is positive, another 9,000 to 53,000 jobs would be created through re-spending.</li></li></ul><li>Wind costs less<br />Michigan Public Service Commission 2011 Report<br /><ul><li>2008 - new coal plant - $133 MW
  14. 14. Wind PPAs actually signed - $96 MW
  15. 15. Last DTE contract - $60 MW</li></li></ul><li>Wind energy<br />High Growth:<br />Capital investment flowing in<br />Generation capacity<br />2004 – 2% of new capacity<br />2008 – 42% of new capacity<br />2009 added 10,000MW<br />
  16. 16. Windshot<br />DOE strategic cost reduction initiative<br />Reduce the cost of offshore wind<br /><ul><li>$.10 kwh by 2020
  17. 17. $.07 kwh by 2030</li></li></ul><li>2009 - $3.4 billion in US deployment<br />2009 – 1,600MW of installed solar capacity<br />2010 - $6 billion in US deployment<br />2010 – 2,600MW of installed solar capacity<br />Grid connected installations increased by 102%<br />Solar<br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. <ul><li>1.4 billion people without electricity
  20. 20. Huge export opportunity for manufacturers of compact energy systems</li></ul>2009 - $186 billion<br />2010 - $243 billion<br />2020 - $1 – 2.3 trillion<br />Global Clean Energy Investment<br />
  21. 21. Huge global opportunity<br /><ul><li>International Energy Agency- $20 trillion by 2030; $45 trillion by 2050
  22. 22. $112 trillion in avoided fuel costs
  23. 23. ASES - $4.5 trillion in economic benefit to U.S. by 2030
  24. 24. 20 million jobs by 2030
  25. 25. By 2030, 1 in 4 jobs could involveclean energy technology</li></li></ul><li>Germany’s Clean Energy Economy<br /><ul><li>300,000 clean energy jobs
  26. 26. 17% of electricity generation from renewables today
  27. 27. 32-35% by 2020
  28. 28. Most solar deployment in the world
  29. 29. Successfully “reindustrialized”the German economy</li>

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