April 2012 - Michigan Energy Forum - Peter Smith

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Come join the Michigan Energy Forum on Thursday April 5 as we discuss the role of nuclear energy in Michigan and abroad in addressing global climate change. Panelists will include representatives from …

Come join the Michigan Energy Forum on Thursday April 5 as we discuss the role of nuclear energy in Michigan and abroad in addressing global climate change. Panelists will include representatives from industry, academia, and the State who will share their views of the role that nuclear energy should play to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and generate economic development opportunities. While nuclear energy can be a very controversial topic, the purpose of this forum is to discuss the science, economics, and risks and rewards of nuclear energy and to learn more about what is going on in Michigan. Please join us on April 5 for this exciting forum.

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  • 1. Fermi 3Combined License Application Project DTE Energy Peter W. Smith April 5, 2012
  • 2. Planning for the Future In February 2007, DTE Energy announced its intention to begin preparing a Combined License Application (COLA) for a new nuclear unit at the Fermi site. This was based on preliminary analysis of current and future supply, demand, and underlying input cost assumptions, as well as environmental and other economic considerations As our modeling inputs continue to be updated to reflect new information, nuclear remains a viable and cost effective option for our customers. We have not decided when to build the new unit. However, we are pursuing the license so that we are prepared to meet the State’s future energy and environmental needs. In the near term, DTE Energy has significant wind and solar developments in progress along with Energy Efficiency programs designed to meet the State Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards
  • 3. DTE Energy Overview Strong, Stable and Growing Utilities ~80% of DTE Energy’s Earnings Detroit Edison • Electric generation and distribution • 2.1 million customers • Fully regulated by Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) MichCon • Natural gas distribution • 1.2 million customers • Fully regulated by MPSC
  • 4. DTE Energy Overview Complementary Non-Utility Businesses ~20% of DTE Energy’s 2010 Earnings Gas Storage & Pipelines Power & Industrial Projects Unconventional Gas Production DTE Energy non-utility businesses currently have holdings and Energy Trading operate in 26 states
  • 5. Nuclear Energy in MichiganEntergy- Palisades 778 MWAEP - DC Cook 1 1009 MWAEP - DC Cook 2 1009 MWDTE - Fermi 2 1122 MWTotal Nuclear 3918 MW 5
  • 6. U.S. & Michigan Electricity Generation % By Fuel Source Nuclear Oil Gas 20.2% 0.4% 8.5% Gas Hydro Nuclear 23.3% 6.8% 21.6% Wind 1.8% Hydro 1.4% Solar Wind Oil 0.3% 0.02%1.0% Geothermal 0.4% Biomass and Biomass and Other Other 1.8% 1.9% Coal Coal 44.6% 66.0% United States Michigan 2009 2009 Source: Energy Information Administration Updated: 5/10
  • 7. Clean “Emission Free” Electricity Sources% By Fuel Source Hydro 23.5% • In Michigan the percentage of clean energy generated by nuclear is even higher at 93% Other 7.8% • This is primarily due to the relative lack of hydro resources when compared to other regions of the countryNuclear68.7% United States 2009 Source: Energy Information Administration Updated: 5/10
  • 8. Anticipated Environmental Regulatory Requirements for the U.S. Utility Industry Ozone SO2/NO2 CAIR Water Beginning SO2 Primary Revised CAIR Phase I Reconsidered NAAQS Effluent Guidelines Ozone Seasonal Ozone Proposed CAIR Final rule expected Effluent Guidelines NAAQS NOx Cap NAAQS Replacement Final CAIR SO2/NO2 Next Ozone Compliance 3-5 yrs Rule Expected after final rule CAIR Replacement Secondary NAAQS Revision Vacated Rule Expected NAAQS 316(b) Compliance Effluent 316(b) final rule 3-4 yrs after final rule CAIR NO2 Guidelines expected Remanded CO2 proposed rule Primary Regulation expected NAAQS 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 PM-2.5 Begin PM-2.5 Next Beginning CAIR SIPs due Begin CAIR SIPs due Final PM-2.5 New PM-2.5 NAAQS Phase II Annual Beginning (‘97) CAIR Phase I (‘06) Rule for NAAQS Designations SO2 & NOx Caps CAIR Phase Phase I AnnualCAMR & CCBs Revision II Seasonal Annual SO2 Cap HAPS MACT Begin Compliance HAPS MACTDelisting Mgmt NOx Cap NOx Cap final rule Requirements Compliance with Compliance 3 yrsRule vacated HAPs MACT Proposed expected under Final CCB CAIR after final rule proposed Rule for CCBs Rule (ground water Replacement Rule rule Final EPA Management monitoring, double Nonattainment 316(b) proposed monitors, closure, Designations rule expected dry ash conversion) PM2.5 Ash Hg/HAPS CO2 8 -- adapted from Wegman (EPA 2003) Updated 2.15.10
  • 9. New Plant Licensing Process10 CFR Part 52 The Design Certification process allows vendors to secure NRC approval Design of advanced plant designs. This is the key to design standardization.Certifica- Design certification is required before a COL can be issued. tion The Early Site Permit process enables companies to obtain advance Early approval for a nuclear power plant site before deciding to build a plant or Site Permit even what kind of plant to build. ESPs resolve environmental and safety (ESP) concerns associated with the site The licensing process for new nuclear power plants provides for issuanceCombined of a combined construction permit and operating license (COL). Granting a License (COL) COL signifies resolution of all environmental and safety issues associated with the plant. ITAAC are Inspections, Tests, Analysis, and Acceptance Criteria established as a condition of the combined license that must be completed ITAAC before the plant is allowed to operate. ITAAC cover design, construction, operational, and various site specific aspects of the plant. 9
  • 10. Application Review Process Fermi 3 COLA Review Process Summary (Dates reflect current NRC schedule) Safety Review 08/10 09/12 02/13 Phase 1 Phase 3 05/13 RAI’s & Phase 2 Phase 4 ACRS Responses Draft SER Final SER Review Approximately 75% complete 08/08 09/08 Public File Outreach COLA Public Participati on NRC Activity Activity Com plete d
  • 11. Application Review Process Fermi 3 COLA Review Process Summary (Dates reflect current NRC schedule) Safety Review 08/10 09/12 02/13 Phase 1 Phase 3 05/13 RAI’s & Phase 2 Phase 4 ACRS Responses Draft SER Final SER Review Approximately 75% complete 08/08 09/08 Public File Outreach COLA 07/09 10/11 01/12 Public Phase 1 Phase 3a Phase Phase 2 Participati Scoping Comment 3b on Draft EIS 11/12 Activities Period Final EIS NRC Activity Environmental Review Activity Com plete d
  • 12. Application Review Process Fermi 3 COLA Review Process Summary (Dates reflect current NRC schedule) Safety Review 08/10 09/12 02/13 Phase 1 Phase 3 05/13 RAI’s & Phase 2 Phase 4 ACRS Responses Draft SER Final SER Review Approximately 75% complete 09/13 08/08 09/08 01/09 ASLB Combined Public File Notice to Contention Hearing License Outreach COLA Intervene Process Issued 07/09 10/11 01/12 Public Phase 1 Phase 3a Phase Phase 2 Participati Scoping Comment 3b on Draft EIS 11/12 Activities Period Final EIS NRC Activity Environmental Review Activity Com plete d
  • 13. ESBWR Overview Detroit Edison has selected the General Electric-Hitachi ESBWR for reference in the Fermi 3 Combined License Application. A 3rd generation advanced design boiling water reactor (BWR) with a capacity ~1,560 MW. Designed to meet new demanding security requirements.Utilizes advanced safety features utilizing natural circulation, gravity powered coolingsystems and non-mechanical safety features.Employs 25 percent fewer pumps, valves and motors than previous BWR’sEmploys modular integrated structure construction, saving construction time and cost
  • 14. ESBWR Overview Selection of the ESBWR resulted from internal and 3rd party evaluation of the various available reactor technologies and included numerous attributes - Safety - Technical - Strategic - Operational - Commercial The NRC has successfully completed technical and safety review of the ESBWR Formal rulemaking is now underway with a Design Certification expected in the 2nd quarter 2012.
  • 15. ESBWR Key Design Elements • ESBWR design is a Generation III+ plant with safety through passive systems • No reliance on diesel generators for safety • Passive nature allows for 72 hour period with no operator action and no AC power•Reactor building self sufficient…self contained systems and heat sink•Station Blackout (SBO) event coping time extended beyond 72 hours through low pressurewater makeup to pools outside containment•Passive features maintain fuel cooled and covered with water
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  • 17. Fermi 3Combined License Application Project DTE Energy Peter W. Smith April 5, 2012