UNIT -2ISP essentially involvesI) Identification of the stage of IS in the org.ii) Identification of the applications of o...
B) Critical path method               C) Gantt chartSTRATEGIC INFORMATION SYSTEM PLANNINGIn order to put the planning for ...
• Main approach: entrepreneurial (user innovation), multiple (bottom-up development, topdownanalysis, etc.) at the same ti...
firm that can discovera better technology for performing an activity than its competitors thusgains competitive advantage”...
(b) Because of its focus on internal operations instead of data, it fails to define a data structurefor thefirm.(c) The ba...
IStrengths: CSF analysis provides a very powerful method for concentrating on keyinformationrequirements of an organizatio...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ism unit 3

206 views
169 views

Published on

about information system n sdlc

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
206
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ism unit 3

  1. 1. UNIT -2ISP essentially involvesI) Identification of the stage of IS in the org.ii) Identification of the applications of organizational ISs,iii) Evaluation of each of these applications,based on established evaluation criteriaiv) Establishing a priority ranking for these application, andV)Determining theoptimumarchitecture of IS for serving the top priority applications4 stage model of IS planning1. Strategic planning A) Derivation from the organizational plan B) Strategic fit with organizational culture C) Strategy set transformation2. Information requirement analysis A) Define underlying organizationalrequirements B) Develop sub system matrix C) Define and evaluate informationrequirements for organizational sub-systems 3. Resource allocation A) Return on investment B) Charge out C) Portfolio approach D) Steering committees 4. Project planning A) Milestones
  2. 2. B) Critical path method C) Gantt chartSTRATEGIC INFORMATION SYSTEM PLANNINGIn order to put the planning for strategic information systems in perspective, the evolutionofinformation systems according to the three-era model of John Ward, et al.(1990) ispertinent.According to this model there are three distinct, albeit overlapping, eras of informationsystems,dating back to the 60‟s. The relationship over time of the three eras of informationsystems isshown in tableSome characteristics of strategic IS planning are:• Main task: strategic/competitive advantage, linkage to business strategy.• Key objective: pursuing opportunities, integrating IS and business strategies• Direction from: executives/senior management and users, coalition of users/management andinformation systems.
  3. 3. • Main approach: entrepreneurial (user innovation), multiple (bottom-up development, topdownanalysis, etc.) at the same time.Strategic Information Systems Planning MethodologiesThe task of strategic information systems planning is difficult and often time organizationsdo notknow how to do it. Strategic information systems planning is a major change fororganizations,from planning for information systems based on users‟ demands to those based on businessstrategy. Also strategic information systems planning changes the planning characteristicsinmajor ways. We classify SISP methodologies into two categories: impact and alignment.Impactmethodologies help create and justify new uses of IT, while the methodologies in the“alignment”category align IS objectives with organizational goals. These two views of SISP areshown infigureA. Impact Methodologies1. Value Chain Analysis: The concept of value chain is considered at length by MichaelPorter(1984). According to him, „every firm is a collection of activities that are performed todesign,produce, market, deliver, and support its product. All these activities can be representedusing avalue chain.‟ Porter goes on to explain that information technology is one of the majorsupportactivities for the value chain. “Information systems technology is particularly pervasivein the valuechain, since every value activity creates and uses information.The recent, rapidtechnologicalchange in information systems is having a profound impact on competition andcompetitiveadvantage because of the pervasive role of information in the value chain. ..Changein the way officefunctions can be performed is one of the most important types of technologicaltrends occurringtoday for many firms, though few are devoting substantial resources to it. .. A
  4. 4. firm that can discovera better technology for performing an activity than its competitors thusgains competitive advantage”(Porter, 1985). A typical value chain is summarized in the figure 2.Once the value chain is charted, executives can rank order the steps in importance todeterminewhich departments are central to the strategic objectives of the organization. Also,executivescan then consider the interfaces between primary functions along the chain of production,andbetween support activities and all of the primary functions. This helps in identifyingcriticalpoints of inter-departmental collaboration. Thus, value chain analysis:(a) Is a form of business activity analysis which decomposes an enterprise into its parts?(b) Helps in devising information systems which increase the overall profit available to a firm.(c) Helps in identifying the potential for mutual business advantages of component businesses, inthesame or related industries, available from information interchange.(d) Concentrates on value-adding business activities and is independent of organizationalstructure.Strengths: The main strength of value chain analysis is that it concentrates on direct valueaddingactivities of a firm and thus pitches information systems right into the realm of valueadding ratherthan cost cutting.Weaknesses: Although a very useful and intuitively appealing, value chain analysis suffers fromafew weaknesses, namely,(a) It only provides a higher level information model for a firm and fails to addressthedevelopmental and implementation issues.
  5. 5. (b) Because of its focus on internal operations instead of data, it fails to define a data structurefor thefirm.(c) The basic concept of a value chain is difficult to apply to non-manufacturing organizationswherethe product is not tangible and there are no obvious raw materials.(d) It does not provide an automated support for carrying out analysis.2. Critical Success Factor Analysis: Critical success factors analysis can be considered to bebothan impact as well as an alignment methodology. Critical Success Factors (CSF) in thecontext ofSISP are used for interpreting more clearly the objectives, tactics, and operationalactivities in termsof key information needs of an organization and its managers and strengths andweaknesses of theorganization‟s existing systems. Rockart (1979) defines critical success factorsas being „for anybusiness the limited number of areas in which results, if they are satisfactory,will ensure successfulcompetitive performance for the organization.‟ As shown in figure 3, CSFscan exist at a number oflevels. They represent the few key areas where things must go right forthe business to flourish.Consequently, critical success factors are areas of activity that should receive constant andcarefulattention from management.Rockart originally developed the CSF approach as a means tounderstanding the informationneeds of CEOs. The approach has subsequently been applied tothe enterprise as a whole and hasbeen extended into a broader planning methodology. It hasbeen made the basis of many consultingpractices and has achieved major results where it hasbeen used well.CSFs can exist at a number of levels, i.e., industry, organizational, business unit, ormanager‟s.CSFs at a lower level are derived from those at the preceding higher level. The CSF approachintroduces information technology into the initial stages of the planning process andhelpsprovide a realistic assessment of the IT‟s contribution to the organization.Figure 3: Hierarchy of CSFs
  6. 6. IStrengths: CSF analysis provides a very powerful method for concentrating on keyinformationrequirements of an organization, a business unit, or of a manager. This allows themanagement toconcentrate resources on developing information systems around theserequirements. Also, CSFanalysis is easy to perform and can be carried out with few resources.Weaknesses: (a) although a useful and widely used technique, CSF analysis by itself is notenoughto perform comprehensive SISP - it does not define data architecture or providesautomatedsupport for analysis.(b) To be of value, the CSF analysis should be easily and directly related back to the objectivesof thebusiness unit under review. It has been the experience of the people using this techniquethatgenerally it loses its value when used below the third level in an organizational hierarchy(Ward,1990, p.164).(c) CSFs focus primarily on management control and thus tend to be internally focusedandanalytical rather than creative(d) CSFs partly reflect a particular executive‟s management style. Use of CSFs as an aidinidentifying systems, with the associated long lead-times for developing these systems, maylead togiving executive information that s/he does not regard as important.B. Alignment MethodologiesREST IN STRATEGIC IS PLANNING PDF …

×