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Training Ciem March 2010

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Training pp for use at CIEM March 2010

Training pp for use at CIEM March 2010

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  • 1. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google   Workshop by Anja Møller Rasmussen and Bernd Wunsch, NIAS
  • 2. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Scientific research is as much the product of the society that enables it, as of the individuals who author it.
    • David Dorling, 2006
  • 3. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google The size of the countries are proportional to the percentage of all scholarly publications published there by authors -data is from the World Bank Development Indicators
  • 4. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • The internet has created new possibilities for enhancing the visibility of research outputs and has greatly increased the potential audience for them.
    • It is not enough, however, just to produce digital content and place it in a repository or on a website. If the research outputs are not easily accessible to the user who wishes to access them their value is not being fully realised.
    • Further, it may be that the knowledge needs to be transformed in some way to realise the value of the work to different stakeholders.
  • 5. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Why communicate science?
    • Communicating research results is essential to promote knowledge sharing, public awareness, transparency and accountability.
    • For you to assert your status as experts in research and development, you need to take advantage of the technology available. You need to make sure your peers find your data and research outcome.
    • You need visibility.
  • 6. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • In addition, the communication of research is of direct value to the researchers themselves and can help by:
    • Drawing the attention of public and private funding sources.
    • Attracting the interest of potential partners and/or peers.
    • Enhancing the reputation of individual and team researchers at local national and international level.
    • Facilitating financial licensees.
    • Drawing in new audiences and influence policymakers
    .      
  • 7. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • There are two main things to consider when using the Internet to increase the availability and accessibility of research outputs:
    • Digital content: research outputs may be placed in a digital repository, at a Portal, in a blog or wiki but need to be tailored or converted into more palatable formats if you want internet users to access it.
    • Dissemination: digital content can be carried on the Web as far and wide, thanks to social networks formed through various social media.
  • 8. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • This workshop is designed to acquaint you with:
    • The importance of Web2.0 tools and services, such as newsfeeds, blogs and wikis, which enable researchers and communicators to participate in new ways of sharing research outputs or information about them.
    • New formats for the dissemination of knowledge, such as video, which can bring research information to new stakeholders.
    • Ways in which your outputs can be aggregated with those of other groups around the world, either by inclusion in services which bring related content together in databases, or by using services which search across related sites.
  • 9. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • The present world wide web is very different from that we used just a few years ago.
    • We used to rely heavily on software applications loaded onto our PCs - more of the applications are now available across the web. Key examples are calendars and email where google offers similar services to microsoft outlook.
    • Services are even expanded with a headset and microphone turning the computer into an international phone system with the help of Skype.
  • 10. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google WEB 2.0 moved the Internet from “push” to “pull” From pre-designed web sites and portals to user-based content; a loosely-coupled system of different Internet applications for the social creation of knowledge.
  • 11. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google So We have now techologies. We have a shift from consumers to active users participating as curators and creators. We have a new open knowledge culture allowing for open access and creative remix; creative commons is a challence to traditional copy rights allowing for information to be used and distributed in a quick and flexible way. We have new posiblities for networking and creation and sharing of information. WEB 2.0 offers powerful new ways for scholars to publish, interact and for social networking.
  • 12. 21 st century web Web2 services eMAIL - Gmail Word - Writely Access - Googlebase Favorites - Delicious Telephone – Skype Websites - blogger Agriculture in Kenya Francis 2007 This article demonstratees That with the new web Content is stored Separately from layout And display details S oftware across web S hareable - social networking S upports keywords as tags S eparate content from display S ite from sources - mashup web2
  • 13.  
  • 14. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • How can this change the way we look at scientific communication and your visibility at the Web?
    • Communication research
    • Working together online
    • Storing your links/references
    • New interfaces
    • Seeing what is new
    • Searching and Googology
    • Detour to the web
  • 15. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • You “create” your own WEB present by using:
    • Professional social networks like Linkedin.com , Eldis Community or Barha
    • Upload PowerPoints to Slideshare.com
    • Upload video clips and photos to blip.tv, Youtube or Flicker
    • Use social bookmarking systems like Delicious.com
    • and academic software to o rganize, share and discover
    • research papers like Mendeley.com
    • Use blogs, wikis and digital repositories to disseminate your research output
    • Podcasts from conferences and workshops
  • 16. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Blogging
    • A 'blog' is a type of website in which one or more bloggers regularly post entries in a similar fashion to a diary or a journal, it is a way of disseminate information or expose your self to the public.
    • Blogs are flexible, interactive and cost-effective and readers expect communicating in a more informal way.
    • A blog can extend an institution's influence by attracting development policymakers and practitioners to engage in a way that is more interactive than websites and e-mail.
    • Blogs can create a forum for expert commentary and analysis on burning development policy issues;
  • 17. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Easy-to-read, can make the case for important policy issues that are not in the spotlight.
    • Blogs can help set the media agenda
    • For those interested in a specific topic, relevant blogs could eventually become a leading supplement to traditional print and online news;
    • The feedback loops created by the blog could lead to new audiences and collaboration opportunities
    • You can create your own blog or use blogs at social networking sites or your institutions website
    • Tools: www.wordpress.com
    • Excample: http://www.2point6billion.com/ , http://barha.asiaportal.info/InFocus
  • 18. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Twitter or microblogging
    • Rather than publishing a whole article at a blog, a service such as twitter allows you to post a short message of 140 characters.
    • Useful if you want to keep a group informed of what you are doing. It becomes a web broadcast sms service, and can even be used from a phone.
    • Useful during workshops and conferences
    • http://www.twitter.com
  • 19. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Collaborative publishing using Wikis
    • A new form of group authorship often combined with self-publishing. Wikipedia being the most well-known example.
    • Often this is then made freely available to access and use, subject to certain licensing restrictions like common creatives.
  • 20. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • A wiki is a type of website that allows the visitors themselves to easily add, remove and otherwise edit and change some available content, sometimes without the need for registration
    • It is a tool for cooperation and is particular useful for a group assembling material or writing collectively i.e. Writing a book or article
    • Can be used for writing Papers, Applications, Project management, Policy papers and Manuals
    • Easy to publish and easy access
    • Exsample: ComPart wiki ; http:// pbwiki.com ; http:// www.asiaportal.info / wiki / index.php / Main_Page
  • 21. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • RSS feeds  
    • RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication, it is a file format which allows you to save and see the content of a website seperate from the way it is displayed.
    • This is the essense of web2, the way information can flow from one service to another.
    • When you write your blog story, the headline and first few lines are put in a file called a feed.
    • You or anyone else can then use this file to put the same headlines on their website or desktop, and when they click on these headlines they come back to your blog or web site for the full story.
  • 22. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Social bookmarking and Tagging
    • It is a new way to save your bookmarks rather than just adding to favorites in your browser – you save them online.
    • Social bookmarking websites like Delicious.com allow you to archive, organize and share Internet resources that you find useful.
    • When you find interesting links on the web, you bookmark and index them, using descriptive labels called 'tags'. From each of these tags, or from combinations of them, you can then generate lists of selected resources and republish them. This way, the resources each of us bookmarks will be available for colleagues, partners and eventually the general public
    .
  • 23. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • The collective use of this system by the different staff or project members can also assure a constant flow of content, as the new entries we all save in del.icio.us will be automatically incorporated in the relevant pages, displaying at the top of the different lists of resources.
    • http://web2share.pbwiki.com/tagging
    • http://delicious.com/
  • 24. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Slideshare
    • Upload and share your PowerPoint presentations, Word documents and Adobe PDF Portfolios on SlideShare.
    • Share publicly or keep private for your own use.
    • Easy way to collect presentations for an event in one place; create an account and ask the speakers to upload the presentations in advance
    • Add audio to make a webinar in a simple way.
    • http://www.slideshare.net/
  • 25. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Video clips and podcasting
    • Can be used to share recorded conferences, events and interviews
    • Present research outcome in an educational and informative way and is widely used to disseminate research
    • Do it your self; digital camera’s or even mobile phones can easely be used
    • Store at Blip.tv or youtube.com (it is ok) and Embed it on your blog or web site
    • http://r4d.blip.tv/search?q=r4d+communications
  • 26. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Mashups and examples
    • In web2 terms it means you can bring all the content from a number of different websites into one place.
    • You can either do this on your own website by “embedding” videos or presentations into your pages for example, or taking the latest headlines from a site and displaying them on your desktop as a personal webpage or “reader” e.g. iGoogle
    • Have a look at how we report from workshops using mashups
    • http://barha.asiaportal.info/groups/gendering-asia
  • 27. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Create references
    • Online research management, writing and collaboration tools is designed to help researchers easily gather, manage, store and share all types of information, as well as generate citations and bibliographies in the right academic way
    • Refbase is one of many new web-based, platform-independent, multi-user interface for managing scientific literature & citations. http:// refbase.sourceforge.net /
  • 28. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Mendelay
    • Mendeley Desktop organizes your research paper collection and citations. It automatically extracts references from documents, generates bibliographies, and is freely available.
    • Mendeley Web lets you access your research paper library from anywhere, share documents in closed groups, and collaborate on research projects online. It connects you to like-minded academics and puts the latest research trend statistics at your fingertips.
    • Http:// www.mendeley.com
  • 29. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Zotero
    • is a free, open source scholars' extension for the Firefox browser. Zotero is in part a piece of reference management software, used to manage bibliographies and references when writing essays and articles. It enables its users to collect, manage, and cite research all types of sources without leaving their browser. On many major research websites such as digital libraries, Google Scholar , or even Amazon.com , Zotero will sense when a book, article, or other resource is being viewed and with one click it will find and automatically save the full reference information to a local reference library. Selections of the local reference library data can later be exported as formatted bibliographies for research papers or other purposes. http:// www.zotero.org /
  • 30. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Connotea
    • is a free online reference management service for scientists, researchers, and clinicians, created by Nature Publishing Group.
    • Unlike many of the other well-known tools, Connotea is aimed primarily at scientists, and while users may bookmark any webpage they choose, it incorporates special functionality for certain academic resources. Connotea recognises a number of scientific websites and will automatically collect metadata for the article or page being bookmarked, including author and publication names. http:// www.connotea.org /
  • 31. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • And many many more:
    • Flickr: Photos
    • Facebook: Socialnetworking site more for private and family use
    • Ning: organise teams
    • Meebo: networking
    • SurveyMonkey: e-surveys
    • StumbleUpon: channel surf the net and share your findings
    • Take a tour using : http://our23things.infopeople.org/the_23_things/
  • 32. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Googology
    • Google Books/Google print. For checking references to work and projects provides a quick guide to relevance of publications. [http://books.google.com]
    • Google Scholar. For access to full text article
    • Google news. Useful to setup email alerts or RSS feeds on specific issues, using an elaborate search make sure to use the “–“ command to exclude non relevant material.
    • Google Alert. Keep yourself current using e-mail updates which provides you with the latest relevant Google search results
    • Picasa Photo organization and editing application, providing photo library options and simple effects.
  • 33. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Earth Virtual globe that uses satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS over a 3D globe.
    • Toolbar Web browser toolbar with features such as a Google Search box, phishing protection, pop-up blocker as well as the ability for website owners to create buttons.
    • YouTube Popular free video sharing Web site which lets users upload, view, and share video clips .
    • iGoogle [Google Personal Homepage] is a customizable, modular, tabular, dynamic page which users can access through their Google Account. You select the content of the page from RSS feeds as well as specialized modules known as Google Gadgets.
    • For not to mentioning: Gmail, Alerts, Group search, maps, and calender
  • 34. How the web has changed and how you can work with it
    • Evaluation of sources
    • Research needs and requirements vary with each assignment, project, or paper. But while there is no single right or absolute way to conduct research, there are methods and skills that can help make your research efforts more efficient and effective.
  • 35. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Before you rely on information, you should:
    • Determine its origin.
    • Discover the author AND the publisher.
    • Ascertain the author and publisher's credentials.
    • Discover the date of the writing. This gives the information historical context.
    • Verify it. Find another reputable source that provides similar information.
  • 36. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Checklist for Research Source Evaluation  
    • Credibility: trustworthy source, author’s credentials, evidence of quality control, known or respected authority, organizational support.
    • Goal: an authoritative source, a source that supplies some good evidence that allows you to trust it.
    • Accuracy: up to date, factual, detailed, exact, comprehensive, audience and purpose reflect intentions of completeness and accuracy.
    • Goal: a source that is correct today (not yesterday), a source that gives the whole truth.
  • 37. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Reasonableness: fair, balanced, objective, reasoned, no conflict of interest, absence of fallacies or slanted tone.
    • Goal: a source that engages the subject thoughtfully and reasonably, concerned with the truth.
    • Support: listed sources, contact information, available corroboration, claims supported, documentation supplied.
    • Goal: a source that provides convincing evidence for the claims made, a source you can triangulate (find at least two other sources that support it). 
  • 38. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • The rules and ethics for using scientific literature
    • In science, knowledge accumulates as individuals study phenomena in the natural world. These researchers base their studies on the information contributed in the past by others, and the results of the new studies provide new information or different interpretations of the subjects under investigation. Scientists share their work through the publication of the results of their original research projects. In this way, the new knowledge is available to all who have an interest in those subjects.
  • 39. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Citing Sources of Information
    • You must cite the sources of information you use.
    • Citing others' work fulfills a number of purposes:
    • it can be a way of recognizing the contributions of pioneers in a field
    • it identifies the original publications in which an idea or concept was first presented
    • it provides access to other readings on the topic of the work at hand
    • it can be used to identify a methodology
    • it is a way to refer to work of one's own or others that is being critiqued or corrected
  • 40. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • You do need to cite if:
    • you refer to or describe specific information that you have taken from a source
    • you refer to a theory or idea from a source
    • you want to incorporate a figure, table, or photograph from another source
  • 41. Scholarly Communication 2.0 = your digital present beyond Google
    • Avoid plagiarism in scholarly writing:
    • Plagiarism means to reproduce or copy another’s work with out decaring this by refering to the original source.
    • So never do not cut and paste text from an electronic source with the intention of paraphrasing the text after copying it.
    • Never do not use direct quotations; in scientific writing, you express the information and ideas you have taken from other sources in your own words, rather than how the author says it.
    • Always think about the information that you're using from another source and when you understand it sufficiently, you'll be able to say it your own words.